NYSESLAT

New York State

English as a Second Language

Achievement Test

 

Manual for Administrators and Teachers

2003 Edition

 

 

  

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK

Regents of The University

Robert M. Bennett, Chancellor, B.A., M.S. Tonawanda

Adelaide L. Sanford, Vice Chancellor, B.A., M.A., P.D. Hollis

Diane O’Neill McGivern, B.S.N., M.A., Ph.D. . Staten Island

Saul B. Cohen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. New Rochelle

James C. Dawson, A.A., B.A., M.S., Ph.D. Peru

Robert M. Johnson, B.S., J.D. Huntington

Anthony S. Bottar, B.A., J.D. North Syracuse

Merryl H. Tisch, B.A., M.A. New York

Geraldine D. Chapey, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. Belle Harbor

Arnold B. Gardner, B.A., LL.B. Buffalo

Harry Phillips, 3rd, B.A., M.S.F.S. Hartsdale

Joseph E. Bowman, Jr., B.A., M.L.S., M.A., M.Ed., Ed.D Albany

Lorraine A. CortÉs-VÁzquez, B.A., M.P.A. Bronx

Judith O. Rubin, A.B. New York

James R. Tallon, jr., B.A., M.A. Binghamton

Milton L. Cofield, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. Rochester

President of The University and Commissioner of Education

Richard P. Mills

Chief Operating Officer

Richard H. Cate

Deputy Commissioner for Elementary, Middle, Secondary and Continuing Education

James A. Kadamus

Assistant Commissioner for Curriculum, Assessment and Instruction

Roseanne DeFabio

Coordinator of Assessment

Gerald E. DeMauro

 

The State Education Department does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, religion, creed, disability, marital status, veteran status, national origin, race, gender, genetic predisposition or carrier status, or sexual orientation in its educational programs, services and activities. Portions of this publication can be made available in a variety of formats, including braille, large print or audiotape, upon request. Inquiries concerning this policy of nondiscrimination should be directed to the Department’s Office for Diversity, Ethics, and Access, Room 530, Education Building, Albany, NY 12234.

 

General Features of the NYSESLAT

New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test

The federal No Child Left Behind Act intends "…to hold State educational agencies, local educational agencies, and schools accountable for increases in English proficiency and core academic content knowledge of limited-English-proficient children by requiring (A) demon-strated improvements in the English proficiency of limited-English-proficient children each fiscal year; and (B) adequate yearly progress for limited-English-proficient children, including immigrant children and youth, as described in section 1111(b)(2)(B)…" (Sec. 3102).

To meet these federal requirements, the State Education Department has developed the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT) to measure the English-language-arts proficiency of limited-English-proficient (LEP) students. It will be given for the first time in May 2003 to LEP students in grades K-12.

The NYSESLAT has five grade levels: K-1, 2-4, 5-6, 7-8, and 9-12. Each grade level has four sessions: Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking. The Session 1–Listening has 22 multiple-choice questions for grades K-1 and 24 multiple-choice questions for grades 2-12. Session 2–Reading has 25 multiple-choice questions for all grade levels. Session 3–Writing has eight open-ended questions for grades K-1 and three open-ended questions for grades 2-12. Session 4–Speaking has five open-ended questions for all grade levels.

Teachers will administer the Listening, Reading, and Writing sessions to groups of students in three sessions on the days of your school’s choosing within the testing period. The sessions have no time limit, but most test takers in grades 2 and above will probably complete each of them within about 50 minutes. The same three sessions of the K-1 test are considerably shorter, requiring approximately 25 minutes each for the Listening and Reading sessions and 15 minutes for the Writing session. Since these times are approximate, teachers should give students a reasonable amount of additional time to finish any portion of these sessions.

Teachers will administer Session 4–Speaking to students individually and in a location separate from other students. Teachers should allow 15 minutes per student to administer it in grades 2-12 and 10 minutes per student to administer it in grades K-1.

The first section of this manual contains information of special interest to administrators. Subsequent material provides directions for administering the NYSESLAT and reporting student scores to the Department. The manual is nonsecure. Schools may photocopy this manual if they need additional copies, and they may retain this manual after the testing is completed and all the school’s secure test and scoring materials have been sent to the Department’s contractor for secure destruction.

 

 

Information for School Administrators

General Information

All persons in charge of administering the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT) should be familiar with the information in this manual. For questions concerning its administration, call the Office of State Assessment at 518-474-5099.

Test Materials

The NYSESLAT has five grade levels with four sessions at each grade level. The Department will provide test books and Teacher’s Guides for each grade level and each session of the test. It will provide prerecorded audiocassette tapes for use in administering the Listening session in grades 2 and above. The Department will also provide answer sheets and labels for use by nonpublic schools. Public schools must obtain answer sheets and labels from their regional information center or Large-City School District Office. The answer sheets will be used to record student responses for all questions in Session 1–Listening and Session 2–Reading. They also contain fields where raters will record student scores for Session 3–Writing and
Session 4–Speaking as well as demographic information that must be reported for each student.

Administration Schedule

Schools must administer the NYSESLAT to their LEP students between May 14 and
May 30, 2003, except as noted below. Each school may choose its own testing days within that time period. Teachers must administer Session 1–Listening, Session 2–Reading, and Session 3–Writing
to groups of students in separate sessions. The sessions are not timed except for Session 1–Listening for grade levels 2-12. That session follows the pacing of the audiocassette tape.

Most students in grades 2-12 should be able to complete the Listening, Reading, and Writing sessions in about 50 minutes. Students in grades K-1 should take about 25 minutes for their sessions. The Department suggests that schools administer Session 1–Listening, Session 2–Reading, and Session 3–Writing in that order. However, schools may administer these sessions in a different order for some or all students if doing so will help the school complete this testing.

Teachers must administer Session 4–Speaking to students individually at a location separate from other students during the NYSESLAT testing period, They should allow 15 minutes to test each student in grades 2-12 and 10 minutes to test each student in grades K-1. Schools that have 500 or more LEP students in a school building may extend the time period for administering Session 4–Speaking only until June 13, 2003. All schools must complete the administration of Session 1–Listening, Session 2–Reading, and Session 3–Writing by May 30, 2003.

Students To Be Tested

All public schools must administer the NYSESLAT to all LEP students in grades K-12. Nonpublic schools are strongly encouraged to administer the test to their LEP students.

Students with Disabilities: Each LEP student with a disability must participate in the NYSESLAT. Use the chronological ages of LEP students in ungraded classes to determine which NYSESLAT grade-level assessment each student will take. In planning for the administration of this test, be sure to consider those students with disabilities who attend programs operated by the Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) as well as any other programs located outside the school.

Testing Accommodations

Limited-English-Proficiency (LEP) Students

The NYSESLAT is designed specifically for LEP students. Therefore, testing accommo-
dations ordinarily permitted for LEP students taking other State examinations are unnecessary and are not permitted for the NYSESLAT. LEP students who have or incur disabilities as described below should be provided with the testing accommodations specified for those situations.

Students Who Incur Disabilities Shortly Before Test Administration

Principals may modify testing procedures for general education students who incur an injury (e.g., a broken arm) or experience the onset of a short- or long-term disability (e.g., epilepsy) that is sustained or diagnosed within 30 days prior to the administration of State assessments. In such cases, when sufficient time is not available for the development of an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or a Section 504 Accommodation Plan (504 Plan), principals may authorize certain accommodations that will not significantly change the skills being tested. These accommodations are limited to:

Eligibility for such accommodations is based on the principal’s professional discretion, but the principal may confer with members of the Committee on Special Education (CSE) or with other school personnel in making such a determination. The principal need not obtain prior permission from the Department to authorize testing accommodations for general education students. However, the principal must send a full report concerning each authorization to the Office of State Assessment. Further, if the student is expected to continue to need testing accommodations, the principal must immediately make the appropriate referral for the development of an IEP or 504 Plan.

Students with Disabilities

All LEP students with disabilities should be allowed the testing accommodations specified in their Individualized Education Program (IEP). However, two testing accommodations are not permitted for any LEP student because they would interfere with the measurement of the construct of that session of the test:

Students who have been declassified may continue to be provided with testing accommodations if the local CSE recommended the accommodations at the time of declassification and included them in the student’s declassification IEP.

Plan all necessary arrangements for implementing testing accommodations well in advance of the test date. The principal is responsible for insuring that students are provided with the testing accommodations specified in their IEP or 504 Plan.

The Department’s Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID) provides more information on testing accommodations for students with disabilities on its web site: ftp://unix2.nysed.gov/pub/education.dept.pubs/vesid/oses/test.access.mod/ testacce.txt.

Security of the Test

The NYSESLAT is a secure test. Teachers and administrators must safeguard the test materials carefully. The materials must be kept secure, and no one may make copies of them. Likewise, no one may make notes of any of the test questions.

Schools must send all secure test materials to the Department’s contractor for secure destruction at the conclusion of testing. These include all used and unused test books (regular, large-type, and braille editions); Teacher’s Guides; scoring materials, both printed and on compact discs; and prerecorded audiocassette tapes supplied by the Department. The Department provides a prepaid address label for shipping the materials. (See page 8 for additional information.)

Preparing Students and School Personnel for the Tests

If the NYSESLAT is to provide an accurate measure of student achievement for the school, both students and teachers should be properly prepared for its administration. Some specific recommendations follow.

Orientation of Students. Inform LEP students about the NYSESLAT a few days before its administration. Tell students that the test is designed to show how well they can listen to, read, write, and speak the English language. Make announcements in such a way as to increase the students’ interest in the tests and at the same time not cause them to become overly concerned. Explain the general types of questions they should expect to see on the tests and the procedures they should follow in recording their answers.

Notification of Parents. Inform parents/guardians of the dates of testing and the purpose of the tests. Ask them to encourage their students to do their best and to ensure that their students are well rested on the dates of testing.

Orientation of Test Administrators. Test administrators should become familiar with the directions in this manual for administering the test at the appropriate grade levels. The school should schedule an orientation prior to the testing dates to allow the test administrators to become adequately prepared.

Preparing for the Test Administration

Preparing the Answer Sheets. Before the day(s) that the NYSESLAT is to be administered, prepare an answer sheet for each student taking the test. Follow the directions from the supplier of the answer sheets for how to fill out the information required.

Preparing the Testing Room(s). The school may decide whether to administer the NYSESLAT Sessions 1-3 in the students’ own classroom(s) or elsewhere and whether to test students in class groups or in groups of other size(s). Session 4–Speaking must be administered to students individually in a location separate from other students. Make sure that each testing room is adequately lighted and ventilated and that it is free from noise and other distractions.

Students Absent on the Test Day. Make provisions to administer the test at a later date to all students who were absent when the test was initially given. These students should not be involved in any classroom discussions about the test prior to the time they take it. The makeup date(s) can be anytime within the designated testing period.

 

Administering the Test

Test Materials

The Department provides the following materials for administering the NYSESLAT:

The school must supply audiocassette player(s) for administering Session 1–Listening to grades 2 and above.

General Directions for Administration

Before each session of the NYSESLAT begins, advise students:

Explain to students that the questions on the NYSESLAT are designed to measure English-language-arts skills ranging from very basic to advanced. As a result, some of the more proficient students may find some test questions rather simple, particularly at the beginning of the test. Similarly, some beginning students may find some test questions very challenging, particularly toward the end of the test. Encourage your students to do their best to answer as many of the questions as they can. Advise them not to be concerned if they think some questions are too easy or too difficult to answer correctly.

Be sure that any students with disabilities have the testing accommodations that their Individual Education Program or Section 504 Accommodation Plan authorizes, with two exceptions:

Except where instruction to do so is indicated in the Teacher’s Guide, do not give students help in interpreting test questions. Advise students to answer the questions according to their best judgment. However, give students all the assistance required in the mechanics of taking the test, such as pointing out for students the correct page in the test book and explaining how to record responses in the test book or on the answer sheet.

Special Considerations During Testing

Unauthorized Materials. Students who are taking State tests should be under close super-vision at all times during the test. When students enter the testing room, proctors must ensure that students do not bring any unauthorized notes, printed material, scrap paper, or tools that would give the user an unfair advantage. The materials that students are permitted to use during the test are identified in the Teacher’s Guide.

Temporary Absence from the Testing Room. Do not permit any student to leave and then return to the testing room during any session of the NYSESLAT unless accompanied by a proctor.

Student Cheating. Do not permit students to obtain information from other students in any way during the test. If, in the opinion of the proctor, such an attempt to obtain information has occurred, warn the students that any further attempts will result in termination of their tests. If necessary, move the students to another location. If these steps fail to end attempts to obtain information, notify the principal immediately and terminate the students’ tests. If, in the judgment of the principal, the student has given aid to or obtained aid from another person during the test, the principal must follow the school’s disciplinary procedure for student cheating and invalidate the students’ tests. Invalidated tests may not be submitted for scoring.

Illness. If a student becomes ill during a session of the NYSESLAT, the student should be excused until well enough to continue. When the student is well enough to continue, the student may complete that session of the test, as long as the testing or makeup period has not ended. Other unadministered sessions of the test should be administered to the student according to the Teacher’s Guide as long as the testing or makeup period has not ended. When giving the student a partially completed session of the test, supervise the student closely so that the student does not go back to previously finished items on the test.

Emergency Evacuation of a School Building. You may be required to evacuate a school building during a test because of an emergency such as a fire alarm or a bomb threat. In any situation in which the safety of the students is endangered, the principal has full authority to interrupt the test immediately. If possible, keep the students under supervision during the emer-gency. Then, if work can be resumed, give students as much time as they need to complete the test.

Specific Instructions for Administering Session 1–Listening

For Grades K-1: Give each student a test book. Instruct them to record all of their answers in the test book using a No. 2 pencil. Explain that for each question you will read a passage to them and then ask them a question about it. Instruct them to listen to the passage and the question and then to look at the four pictures given in their test book as possible answers to that question. Instruct them to circle the picture they believe is the best answer to that question.

For Grades 2-12: Prior to having students begin the test, play the prerecorded audiocassette tape and check that all students participating in this test are able to hear the recording from where they are seated. Once you have determined that the volume is satisfactory for administration of this test, rewind the audiocassette tape to the beginning.

Note: At the conclusion of testing for grades K-2, the teacher or an aide must transcribe students’ responses exactly as the students have recorded them onto each student’s machine-scorable answer sheet.

Specific Instructions for Administering Session 2–Reading

Grades K-1: Give each student a test book. Instruct them to record all of their answers in the test book using a No. 2 pencil. Explain that you will be reading to them to guide them in answering the questions in their test book. All the questions have four choices, which are single letters, words, and/or pictures. Instruct students to circle the choice they think is the best answer to each question.

Grade 2: Give each student a test book. Instruct them to record all of their answers in the test book using a No. 2 pencil. Explain that they will be reading passages in their test book and answering questions about the passages. Instruct them to record their answers to the questions by circling the letter A, B, C, or D that corresponds to the best answer presented in the test book.

Grades 3-12: Give each student a test book and an answer sheet. Instruct them to record their answers to the questions on the answer sheet in the section labeled Reading using a No. 2 pencil. Explain that they will be reading passages in their test book and answering questions about
the passages. They should answer each question by filling in on the answer sheet the letter
A, B, C, or D that corresponds to the best answer presented in the test book.

Note: At the conclusion of testing for grades K-2, the teacher or an aide must transcribe students’ responses exactly as the students have recorded them onto each student’s machine-scorable answer sheet.

Specific Instructions for Administering Session 3–Writing

Grades K-1: Give each student a test book. Have students check to make sure that their name and their teacher’s name appears on their test book. Instruct them to record all of their answers in the test book using a No. 2 pencil. Explain that you will be asking them to write single words; short, dictated sentences; and a short description of a picture they will see.

Grades 2-12: Give each student a test book. Have students check to make sure that their name and their teacher’s name appears on their test book. Instruct them to record all of their answers in the test book using a No. 2 pencil. Explain that they will be writing responses to questions and directions printed in their test books.

Specific Instructions for Administering and Scoring Session 4 - Speaking

Administer the Speaking session individually to each student in a location separate from other students. Teachers administering the Speaking session will be scoring each
student’s response to each of the questions during the administration. Before administering
Session 4– Speaking, all teachers must familiarize themselves with the procedures for scoring the Speaking session contained in the printed scoring guides and the scoring compact discs. In advance of test administration, teachers must also make sufficient copies (1 per student) of the appropriate grade-level Session 4–Speaking Score Sheet for Individual Students (Appendix B).

To administer Session 4–Speaking to an individual student, the teacher must have a copy of the grade-specific Teacher’s Guide for Session 4–Speaking and a copy of the appropriate grade-level Session 4–Speaking Score Sheet for Individual Students.

Grades K–1: Give the student a test book. Explain that you will be asking the student to look at pictures in the test book and that you will ask the student questions about those pictures. Instruct the student to answer the questions by speaking in English. After the student has responded to each question, record the student’s score for that question on the student’s Session 4–Speaking Score Sheet. Then ask the student the next question.

Grades 2–12: Give the student a test book. Explain that you will be reading questions to the student and/or that you will ask the student to respond to questions or directions printed in his or her test book. Instruct the student to respond by speaking in English. After the student has responded to each question, record the student’s score for that question on the student’s Session 4–Speaking Score Sheet. Then ask the student the next question.

All Grades: After Session 4–Speaking has been administered, the school must arrange to have each student’s scores on the Session 4–Speaking Score Sheet for Individual Students copied exactly as recorded in the appropriate spaces on the student’s machine-scorable answer sheet.

Scoring the Tests

The Department will provide printed scoring guides for the Writing and Speaking sessions of the NYSESLAT and audio scoring guides on four compact discs for the Speaking session. One compact disc covers both the K-1 and 2-4 levels, and the other three discs cover one level each for 5-6, 7-8, and 9-12. Appendix A of this manual contains the rubrics to use for each question at each level. Each school is responsible for making the necessary arrangements for the scoring of its students’ tests.

Public Schools. Raters must score their students’ performance on the Writing and Speaking sessions of the NYSESLAT and record those scores on the students’ answer sheets. Schools should check the answer sheets to be sure that the Writing and Speaking scores and all demographic information have been entered correctly. Schools should also check with their scanning center concerning the procedure to follow in preparing their answer sheets for machine scoring. Public schools should send the answer sheets to their scanning center.

Nonpublic Schools. Nonpublic schools must use the answer sheets provided by the Department, as the Department will score the Listening and Reading sessions of the NYSESLAT. The answer sheets contain fields for recording scores for all four sessions of the test. Raters must score their students’ performance on the Writing and Speaking sessions of the NYSESLAT and record those scores on the students’ answer sheets. Schools should check the answer sheets to be sure that the Writing and Speaking scores and all demographic information have been entered correctly. Nonpublic schools should then make copies of the answer sheets and send the originals to the Department’s Office of Information and Reporting Services.

Recording Test Scores and Storing Examination Documents

The Department does not keep records of individual student scores on the tests. Therefore, schools must maintain complete and accurate records. Schools must enter students’ scores on their permanent records. Public schools must retain the student answer sheets in their school files for at least one year after the scanning center returns them. Nonpublic schools must retain photocopies of the student answer sheets in their school files for at least one year.

At the conclusion of NYSESLAT testing, school personnel should complete the Examination Storage Certificate (Appendix C) and the Deputy and Proctor Certificate (Appendix D). The school must retain both of these documents in its files for one year.

Sending Test Materials for Secure Destruction

The Department has provided prepaid UPS Authorized Return Service labels for the NYSESLAT test materials. After your school has administered all sessions of the NYSESLAT and raters have recorded on the student answer sheets all the scores earned by students for Session 3–Writing and Session 4–Speaking, account for all secure test materials as follows:

Pack these materials in the carton(s) in which they were shipped to the school, affix the label(s), and send them for secure destruction to: Empire Recycling Corp., 64 North Genesee and Lee St., Utica, NY 13503. Schools may retain copies of this manual for future reference.

Do not send your students’ answer sheets to Empire Recycling Corporation.

Be sure that the responses of students in Grades K-2 to the questions in their
Session 1–Listening and Session 2–Reading test books have been transcribed onto each student’s machine-scorable answer sheet before sending their test books to the destruction site.

State Education Department Contact

If you have questions about administering the NYSESLAT tests or completing the answer sheet information, please contact the Office of State Assessment by phone at 518-474-5902 or by fax at 518-474-1989.

 

 

Appendix A

Rubrics for the Scoring of Student Responses

for Session 3–Writing and Session 4–Speaking

The rubrics on the following pages (which will also be included in the secure scoring
guides) will be used to score student responses to the questions in Session 3–Writing and
Session 4–Speaking as indicated in the tables below.

Session 3–Writing

Grade

Question Number

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

K-1

Not Scored*

1W

1W

1W

2W

2W

2W

3W

2-4

4W

WR-2

WR-3

5-6

WR-1a

WR-2

WR-3

7-8

WR-1b

WR-2

WR-3

9-12

WR-1c

WR-2

WR-3

Session 4–Speaking

Grade

Question Number

1

2

3

4

5

K-1

SP-1

SP-1

SP-1

SP-1

SP-1

2-4

SP-1

SP-1

SP-1

SP-2

SP-2

5-6

SP-2

SP-2

SP-2

SP-2

SP-2

7-8

SP-2

SP-2

SP-2

SP-2

SP-2

9-12

SP-2

SP-2

SP-2

SP-2

SP-2

 

SESSION 3 — WRITING

WRITING RUBRIC — 1W for Grades K-1: Questions 2-4

Single, Dictated Words

SCORE

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONSE

2

The dictated word is spelled correctly.

1

The response shows phonetic awareness, but the dictated word is spelled incorrectly.

0

There is no response, or the response shows extremely limited phonetic awareness.

 

SESSION 3 — WRITING

WRITING RUBRIC — 2W for Grades K-1: Questions 5-7

Short, Dictated Sentences

SCORE

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONSE

2

The response shows control of the conventions of written English (capitalization, word spacing, and punctuation) and may display a small number of spelling errors that do not interfere with communication. All of the words in the dictated sentences are present in the correct order.

1

The response shows some attempt to spell words and to use conventions (capitalization, word spacing, and punctuation) but errors may impede communication. Most or all of the words in the dictated sentences are present in the correct order.

0

There is no response, or the response is not recognizable as the dictated sentence.

 

SESSION 3 — WRITING

WRITING RUBRIC — 3W for Grades K-1: Question 8

Picture Description

 

SCORE

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONSE

2

The student’s response:

  • describes most of the activity in the picture
  • may display some spelling errors or invented spellings, but these misspellings show phonetic awareness, and the words can be identified by a trained primary-level teacher
  • shows some control of the conventions of written English (capitalization, word spacing, punctuation) but may not be written in complete sentences

1

The student’s response:

  • describes at least some of the activity in the picture
  • displays many spelling errors or invented spellings that may not be identifiable as words
  • shows some limited phonetic awareness and some attempt to use conventions (capitalization, word spacing, punctuation)

0

There is no response, or the response is not recognizable as written English.

 

 

SESSION 3 — WRITING

PREWRITING RUBRIC — 4W for Grades 2-4: Question 1

SCORE

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONSE

2

The student fills in at least four of the boxes with clear and relevant ideas. The responses in most of the boxes have enough detail to show thinking, imagination, or insight into the topic.

1

The student attempts to write something relevant to the topic in some of the boxes. All or most of the responses are single words or very simple phrases.

0

The boxes are blank, or only one box is filled in, or the information written in the boxes is irrelevant or incoherent.

 

SESSION 3 — WRITING

PREWRITING RUBRIC — WR-1a for Grades 5-6: Question 1

SCORE

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONSE

3

The student fills in all five boxes with clear and relevant ideas. The responses in all or most of the boxes provide specific details and show thinking, imagination, or insight into the topic.

2

The student writes a relevant response in the top box and in at least half of the other boxes. Some of these responses provide specific details and show thinking, imagination, or insight into the topic.

1

Responses are general and may lack development or insight into the topic; however, the responses show some understanding of the task.

0

The response does not address the questions at all, or the information is irrelevant or incoherent.

 

  

SESSION 3 — WRITING

PREWRITING RUBRIC — WR-1b for Grades 7-8: Question 1

SCORE

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONSE

3

The student fills in all five boxes with clear and relevant ideas. The responses in all or most of the boxes provide specific details and show thinking, imagination, or insight into the topic.

2

The student writes a relevant response in the top box and in at least half of the other boxes. Some of these responses provide specific details and show thinking, imagination, or insight into the topic.

1

The student writes in some of the boxes. The responses are general and may lack development or insight into the topic; however, the responses show some understanding of the task.

0

The response does not address the questions at all, or the information is irrelevant or incoherent.

 

SESSION 3 — WRITING

PREWRITING RUBRIC — WR-1c for Grades 9-12: Question 1

SCORE

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONSE

3

The student:

  • completes the chart according to the instructions
  • writes in all three organizational boxes
  • provides an appropriate rationale for the way he or she filled in the organizational boxes

2

The student:

  • completes the chart according to the instructions
  • writes in all three organizational boxes.
  • attempts to give an appropriate rationale for the way he or she filled in the organizational boxes, but the rationale may be incomplete or insufficiently described

OR, the student:

  • completes the chart and gives an appropriate rationale for organizing the essay, but does not fill in the organizational boxes

1

The student:

  • writes something relevant to the topic in at least one of the boxes in the chart
  • writes in at least one of the organizational boxes
  • does not provide an appropriate rationale for writing about the changes in a particular order

0

There is no response, the response does not address the questions at all, or the information is irrelevant or incoherent.

 

SESSION 3 — WRITING

Writing the Story/Essay Rubric — WR-2 for Grades 2-12: Question 2

SCORE

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONSE

4

The student’s response:

  • is completely and easily comprehensible, has an appropriate main idea or theme, and addresses all parts of the question
  • provides appropriate and specific details, examples and, if required, supporting evidence; and develops in a coherent and connected way
  • contains language that flows in well-developed sentences, with some variety in sentence structure
  • shows well-developed vocabulary resources (the student usually finds appropriate words to convey meaning)
  • displays few errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation; errors do not interfere with communication

3

The student’s response:

  • is comprehensible, though the reader may have to make an effort to understand it; has an identifiable main idea or purpose; and addresses all parts of the question
  • provides some appropriate details, examples, and, if required, supporting evidence and develops in a coherent and connected way
  • is written entirely, or almost entirely, in complete sentences; displays some variety in sentence structure
  • shows emerging vocabulary resources (the student often finds appropriate words to convey meaning)
  • displays some errors in grammar (for example, in the use of articles and prepositions), spelling, and punctuation, but these errors do not impede communication

2

The student’s response:

  • is somewhat comprehensible but often requires a marked effort on the part of the reader to understand it; may lack a main idea
  • often fails to provide appropriate details, examples, or evidence
  • displays little or no variety in sentence structure; the writing may be choppy or abrupt
  • shows basic vocabulary resources; errors in word choice sometimes interfere with communication
  • displays frequent errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation, and other conventions and avoids more difficult structures; errors may interfere with communication

1

The student’s response:

  • is often incomprehensible, has no main idea or clear purpose, and may not address every part of the question/prompt
  • provides few, if any, details, examples, or evidence
  • contains few, if any, complete sentences; the writing may seem inappropriate or incoherent
  • shows a limited range of vocabulary, which interferes with communication
  • shows little control of grammar and of the conventions of written English

0

The student’s response is not recognizable as written English, does not address the question at all, or is completely irrelevant or incoherent.

 

 

 

 

SESSION 3 — WRITING

EDITING RUBRIC — WR-3 for Grades 2-12: Question 3

SCORE

ITEMS INCORRECT

3

0 - 2

2

3 - 6

1

7 - 9

0

10 - 12

 

 

 

SESSION 4 — SPEAKING

SPEAKING RUBRIC — SP-1 for Grades K-1: Questions 1-5 and Grades 2-4: Questions 1-3

 

SCORE

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONSE

2

The student’s response:

  • is understandable and appropriate
  • is basically grammatically correct
  • presents appropriate word choices for the grade level
  • may have minor errors, but the errors are infrequent, and they do not interfere with communication

1

The student’s response:

  • is understandable
  • displays noticeable errors in grammar
  • displays noticeable errors in word choice
  • displays limited English proficiency

0

The student gives no response, gives a response that cannot be understood as English, or does not demonstrate an understanding of English.

 

 

 

SESSION 4 — Speaking

SPEAKING RUBRIC — SP-2 for Grades 2-4: Questions 4-5 and Grades 5-12: Questions 1-5

SCORE

CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPONSE

3

The student’s response:

  • is completely and easily comprehensible
  • is coherent
  • is fluent
  • provides appropriate and specific details and/or examples
  • shows well-developed vocabulary resources (the student can usually find the right word)
  • may display grammatical mistakes (for example, in the use of articles or prepositions), but mistakes do not generally interfere with communication
  • may display errors of pronunciation and intonation, but these errors do not interfere with communication

2

The student’s response:

  • is comprehensible but may require effort on the part of the listener
  • develops in a somewhat coherent way
  • is somewhat fluent
  • provides some appropriate and specific details and/or examples
  • displays a basic but not wide or extensive vocabulary (the student sometimes cannot find the right word)
  • grammatical errors sometimes interfere with comprehension
  • may display errors in pronunciation and/or intonation that interfere with communication

1

 

The student’s response:

  • is somewhat comprehensible
  • presents limited ideas (the student has difficulty expressing a complete thought without prompting)
  • is spoken haltingly (the student usually produces no more than one
    or two words at a time)
  • provides few, if any, details or examples
  • shows a very limited range of vocabulary (the student often cannot find the right word)
  • shows little control of pronunciation, intonation, or stress

0

The student gives no response, gives a response that cannot be understood as English, or does not demonstrate an understanding of English. (For example, the student may respond, "I don’t know.")

 

Appendix B

Session 4 – Speaking Score Sheets for Individual Students

Session 4 – Speaking Score Sheet for Individual Students in Grades K-1

Student Name _________________________________Test Level______ Test Date______________

(month, day, year)

 

 

SPEAKING RUBRIC — SP-1

2

1

0

The student’s response:

  • is understandable and appropriate
  • is basically grammatically correct
  • presents appropriate word choices for the grade level
  • may have minor errors, but the errors are infrequent, and they do not interfere with communication

The student’s response:

  • is understandable
  • displays noticeable errors in grammar
  • displays noticeable errors in word choice
  • displays limited English proficiency

The student gives no response, gives a response that cannot be understood as English, or does not demonstrate an under-standing of English.

 

Question Number

Score

(enter 2, 1, or 0
for each question)

1

2

3

4

5

 

 

Make one copy for each of your LEP students in grades K-1.

 

Session 4 – Speaking Score Sheet for Individual Students in Grades 2-4

Student Name _________________________________Test Level______ Test Date______________

(month, day, year)

 

SPEAKING RUBRIC — SP-1 for Questions 1-3

2

1

0

The student’s response:

  • is understandable and appropriate
  • is basically grammatically correct
  • presents appropriate word choices for the grade level
  • may have minor errors, but the errors are infrequent, and they do not interfere with communication

The student’s response:

  • is understandable
  • displays noticeable errors in grammar
  • displays noticeable errors in word choice
  • displays limited English proficiency

The student gives no response, gives a response that cannot be understood as English, or does not demonstrate an understanding of English.

Question Number

Score

(enter 2, 1, or 0
for each question)

1

 

2

 

3

 

 

 

SPEAKING RUBRIC — SP-2 for Questions 4-5

3

2

1

0

The student’s response:

  • is completely and easily comprehensible
  • is coherent
  • is fluent
  • provides appropriate and specific details and/or examples
  • shows well-developed vocabulary resources (the student can usually find the right word)
  • may display grammatical mistakes (for example, in the use of articles or prepositions), but mistakes do not generally interfere with communication
  • may display errors of pronunciation or intonation but these errors do not inter-fere with communication

The student’s response:

  • is comprehensible but may require effort on the part of the listener
  • develops in a somewhat coherent way
  • is somewhat fluent
  • provides some appropriate and specific details and/or examples
  • displays a basic but not wide or extensive vocabu-lary (the student sometimes cannot find the right word)
  • grammatical errors sometimes interfere with comprehension
  • may display errors in pronunciation and/or intonation that interfere with communication

The student’s response:

  • is somewhat comprehensible
  • presents limited ideas (the student has difficulty expressing a complete thought without prompting)
  • is spoken haltingly (the student usually produces no more than one or two words at a time)
  • provides few, if any, details or examples
  • shows a very limited range of vocabulary (the student often cannot find the right word)
  • shows little control of
    pronunciation, intonation, or stress

The student gives no response, gives a response that cannot be understood as English, or does not demonstrate an under-standing of English. (For example, the student may respond, "I don’t know.")

Question Number

Score

(enter 3, 2, 1, or 0
for each question)

4

 

5

 

 

Make one copy for each of your LEP students in grades 2-4.

 

Session 4 – Speaking Score Sheet for Individual Students in Grades 5-12

 

Student Name ________________________________________Test Level______ Test Date______________

(month, day, year)

SPEAKING RUBRIC — SP-2

3

2

1

0

The student’s response:

  • is completely and easily comprehensible
  • is coherent
  • is fluent
  • provides appropriate and specific details and/or examples
  • shows well-developed vocabulary resources (the student can usually find the right word)
  • may display grammatical mistakes (for example, in the use of articles or prepositions), but mistakes do not generally interfere with communication
  • may display errors of pronunciation and intonation, but these errors do not interfere with communication

The student’s response:

  • is comprehensible but may require effort on the part of the listener
  • develops in a somewhat coherent way
  • is somewhat fluent
  • provides some appropriate and specific details and/or examples
  • displays a basic but not wide or extensive vocabulary (the student sometimes cannot find the right word)
  • grammatical errors sometimes interfere with comprehension
  • may display errors in pronunciation and/or intonation that interfere with communication

The student’s response:

  • is somewhat comprehensible
  • presents limited ideas (the student has difficulty expressing a complete thought without prompting)
  • is spoken haltingly (the student usually produces no more than one or two words at a time)
  • provides few, if any, details or examples
  • shows a very limited range of vocabulary (the student often cannot find the right word)
  • shows little control of pronunciation, intonation, or stress

The student gives no response, gives a response that cannot be understood as English, or does not demonstrate an under-standing of English. (For example, the student may respond, "I don’t know.")

 

 

Question Number

Score

(enter 3, 2, 1, or 0
for each question)

1

2

3

4

5

 

Make one copy for each of your LEP students in grades 5-12.

 

Appendix C

Examination Storage Certificate

New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test

(NYSESLAT)

BEDS Code __________________________

School Name _________________________

City or Town _________________________

Test Date ____________________________

 

(Month/Day/Year)

I, the undersigned principal of the school named above, do hereby declare that each of the security procedures listed below was fully and faithfully observed for the current administration of the NYSESLAT.

1. The sealed packages of secure test materials were stored in the secure location designated on the order form for the above testing
period.

2. The secure location was maintained under strict security conditions.

3. An inventory of the test materials was conducted as soon after delivery as was practical. The Department was notified if any of the
packages of secure test materials were not properly sealed when received. The sealed packages of secure test materials were
replaced inside the secure location immediately after the inventory was completed.

  1. The sealed packages of secure test materials, except for the scoring materials for
    Session 4–Speaking, were not removed from the secure location, except for the inventory of test materials shipped to the school, until the day(s) on which the test was scheduled to be administered.
  2. The sealed packages of secure materials, except for the scoring materials for
    Session 4–Speaking, were not opened until the day(s) on which the test was scheduled to be administered.
  3. All of the secure test materials were accounted for following the administration of the tests and following scoring of the Writing session. They were all sent to the Empire Recycling for secure destruction.

  

Name of Principal (print or type) ____________________________________________________

Signature of Principal _________________________________________ Date /

(Month/Day/Year)

 

Appendix D

Deputy and Proctor Certificate

New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test

(NYSESLAT)

BEDS Code ___________________________

School Name __________________________

City or Town __________________________

Examination Date ______________________

 

(Month/Day/Year)

We, the undersigned deputies and proctors who assisted in the administration of the NYSESLAT, hereby declare our belief in the correctness of the following statement:

The rules and regulations for administering the test were fully and faithfully observed, and in particular:

  1. The rules for administering the test were read to or read by each person who assisted in administering the test.
  2. The test was held within the prescribed dates.
  3. The secure test materials, except for the scoring materials for Session 4–Speaking, were kept in the sealed packages until the administration date.
  4. The students were given appropriate instructions and orientation before beginning the test.
  5. The students were so seated as to prevent collusion.
  6. Adequate supervision was maintained throughout the administration of the test.
  7. The test books and answer sheets were collected from the students immediately at the close of the test.
  8. All secure test materials and scoring materials for the test were collected and returned to the principal. Note: Schools may permit teachers to retain copies of the Manual for Administrators and Teachers.

1. __________________________________ 11. __________________________________

2. __________________________________ 12. __________________________________

3. __________________________________ 13. __________________________________

4. __________________________________ 14. __________________________________

5. __________________________________ 15. __________________________________

6. __________________________________ 16. __________________________________

7. __________________________________ 17. __________________________________

8. __________________________________ 18. __________________________________

9. __________________________________ 19. __________________________________

10. _________________________________ 20. __________________________________

(Make additional copies as necessary.)

After completion, retain in school files for one year.

 

 

 

Appendix E

Instructions for Nonpublic Schools

 

Answer Sheets

Nonpublic schools must use the machine-scorable answer sheets and labels provided by the Department. Nonpublic schools that have not received answer sheets by May 12, 2003, should contact the Office of Information and Reporting Services at 518-465-6706.

Preparation for Test Administration

Prepare answer sheets and Class Rosters as directed by the memorandum from the Office of Information and Reporting Services.

Scoring the Test

It is the school’s responsibility to make the necessary arrangements for scoring the Writing and Speaking sessions of the test. The student’s responses to questions in Session 4–Speaking are scored as the test is being administered. The students’ responses to the questions in Session 3–Writing are scored after the students have completed that session of the test. A teacher or aide must transcribe each student’s scores from the Session 4–Speaking Score Sheets for Individual Students to that student’s answer sheet. Teachers must record each student’s scores for the Writing session on that student’s answer sheet as the questions are scored.

Sending Student Answer Sheets to the Department

Make sure that all student information is properly recorded on the answer sheets, including the scores for each of the questions on the Writing and Speaking sessions. Make sure that the student ID (litho-code) and name on the Class Roster correspond to the student ID and name on the answer sheet. Complete the Class Roster, indicating the student’s score or whether the student was absent.

Mail your answer sheets and your Class Rosters to:

Kevin McCarthy

NYS Education Department

Information and Reporting Services, Room 863 EBA

89 Washington Avenue

Albany, New York 12234

Prior to submitting your original student answer sheets to the Department, please make copies of them. This provides a record of the answers for your school’s use and protects the data should a package get lost in the mail. Keep these copies in your school for at least one year.

The Department will scan the answer sheets using secure procedures to protect the confidentiality of student records. The Department will not retain student names in its files.

Submitting the machine-scorable answer sheets to the Department satisfies the nonpublic school reporting requirements for the NYSESLAT. Nonpublic schools will not be required to report aggregate test results to the Department.

 Special Instructions Regarding Students with Disabilities

Public school districts are responsible for reporting assessment results for each student with disabilities placed outside the district by its Committee on Special Education (CSE). Nonpublic schools with enrollments that include LEP students with disabilities who have been placed in the school by a public school district CSE must contact the public school district to obtain the appropriate public school answer sheets.

Do not send answer sheets for these students to the Department for scoring. Record the students’ scores for Session 4–Speaking on their answer sheets and send the answer sheets and their Session 3–Writing test books to each student’s public school district (home school district) immediately after the NYSESLAT is completed. Each public school district must score its students’ responses to the Writing session and must submit the score sheets to its scanning center.

 

Appendix F

NYSESLAT Fax Form

for contacting the New York State Education Department

After completing training for rating the Writing or Speaking session responses, if you have questions regarding the NYSESLAT scoring, please fax your inquiries to the Department using the form below. A team member will contact you within 24 hours of receiving your question(s).

FAX to 518-474-1989

BEFORE FAXING THE DEPARTMENT:

Please provide the following information (please print clearly). It will help our New York State team members to respond quickly and accurately.

___________________________________________________________________________

For example:

ISSUE _______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________