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SOCIAL STUDIES

Standard 1 – History of the United States and New York
Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.

Key Idea 1 - The study of New York State and the United States history requires an analysis of the development of American culture, its diversity and multicultural context, and the ways people are unified by many values, practices, and traditions.

Key Idea 2 - Important ideas, social and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions from New York State and United States history illustrate the connections and interactions of people and events across time and from a variety of perspectives.

Key Idea 3 - Study about the major social, political, economic, cultural, and religious developments in New York State and United States history involves learning about the important roles and contributions of individuals and groups.

Key Idea 4 - The skills of historical analysis include the ability to: explain the significance of historical evidence; weigh the importance, reliability, and validity of evidence; understand the importance of changing and competing interpretations of different historical developments.

 

Standard 2 – World History
Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to Demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in world history and examine the broad sweep of history from a variety of perspectives.

Key Idea 1 - The study of world history requires an understanding of world cultures and civilizations including an analysis of important ideas, social and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions. This study also examines the human condition and the connections and interactions of people across time and space and the way different people view the same event or issue from a variety of perspectives.

Key Idea 2 - Establishing timeframes, exploring different periodizations, examining themes across time and within cultures, and focusing on important turning points in world history help organize the study or world cultures and civilizations.

Key Idea 3 - Study of the major social, political, cultural, and religious developments in world history involves learning about the important roles and contributions of individuals and groups.

Key Idea 4 - The skills of historical analysis include the ability to investigate differing and competing interpretations of the theories of history, hypothesize about why interpretations change over time; explain the importance of historical evidence; and understand the concepts of change and continuity over time.


Standard 3 – Geography
Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live—local, national, and global—including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth’s surface.

Key Idea 1 - Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography.

 

Standard 4 – Economics
Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to Demonstrate their understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms.

Key Idea 2 - Economics requires the development and application of the skills needed to make informed and well-reasoned economic decisions in daily and national life.

 

Standard 5 – Civics, Citizenship, and Government
Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the necessity for establishing governments; the governmental system of the United States and other nations; the United States Constitution; the basic civic values of American constitutional democracy; and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship, including avenues of participation.

Key Idea 1 - The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law.

Key Idea 2 - The state and federal governments established by the Constitutions of the United States and the State of New York embody basic civic values (such as justice, honesty, self-discipline, due process, equality, majority rule with respect for minority rights, and respect for self, others and property), principles and practices  and establish a system of shared and limited government.

Key Idea 3 - Central to civics and citizenship is an understanding of the roles of the citizen within American constitutional democracy and the scope of a citizen’s rights and responsibilities.

Key Idea 4 - The study of civics and citizenship requires the ability to probe ideas and assumptions, ask and answer analytical questions, take a skeptical attitude toward questionable arguments, evaluate evidence, formulate rational conclusions, and develop and refine participatory skills.

New York State Education Department
Civics Education Toolkit
Learning Standards Crosswalk
© 2008 NYSED