NYSED Global History and Geography Online Resource Guide

Unit 5

 

Core Curriculum

Essential Questions

Focus Questions

Vocabulary

Scholarship

Helpful Hints

Resources for Teachers
(Books/Articles,
Visuals/Music)

Visuals

Learning Experience(s)

Assessments

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home > units >unit 5>Imperialism

H. Imperialism

1.

Reasons for imperialism—nationalistic, political, economic, "The White Man’s Burden," Social Darwinism

2. Spatial characteristics—"new imperialism"
3. British in India
 
a. British East India Company
b. Sepoy Mutiny
4.

British, French, Belgians, and Germans in Africa

 
a. Scramble for Africa
b. The Congress of Berlin
c. African resistance—Zulu Empire
d. Boer War
e. Cecil Rhodes
f. 19th-century anti-slave trade legislation
5. European spheres of influence in China
 
a.

Opium Wars (1839 - 1842 and 1858 - 1860) and the Treaty of Nanjing

 

   1) Unequal treaties

   2) Extraterritoriality   

b. Boxer Rebellion
c. Sun Yat-sen (Sun Yixian) and the Chinese Revolution (1910-1911)
6.

Multiple perspectives toward imperialism

 
a. Immediate/long-term changes made under European rule
b. Long-term effects in Europe and the rest of the world

Focus Questions

What is the difference between "Old Imperialism" and "New Imperialism?" Which centuries fit each phrase?
Why did nations adopt imperialist policies?
What is the relationship between nationalism and imperialism?
Why were Social Darwinist theories popular with nationalists? imperialists?
What led to the Sepoy Mutiny in India in 1857?
How did British views on how to control their assets in India change after the Sepoy Mutiny?
What was the effect of the Berlin Conference in 1884?
What strategies did Africans adopt to resist European imperialism?
In what ways did events in the Belgian Congo contribute to an anti-slavery reform movement in Europe?
How did nationalistic conflicts between European imperialists in Africa lead to World War I?
Imperialistic powers had wanted to trade on their own terms with China for centuries, but the Chinese greatly reduced contact with foreigners during the late Ming and Qing dynasties. What commodity did the British introduce into China to get the Chinese to become more interested in trading with imperialist barbarians?
What were the immediate and long-term impacts of European imperialism in Asia?

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Vocabulary

assimilation new imperialism
caudillo old imperialism
direct rule Pacific Rim
El Norte paternalism
extraterritorial rights racism
geopolitics Raj
imperialism sepoy
indirect rule Social Darwinism
land redistribution spheres of influence
La Reforma Victorian Age
liberation theology


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Helpful Hints

Provide students with a variety of opportunities to analyze and evaluate conflicting and competing viewpoints of imperialism.
Have students develop a mind map that demonstrates the relationships between industrialization and imperialism that includes examples in both Africa and Asia.
Have students create a graphic organizer that compares and contrasts the Sepoy Mutiny, the Boer Wars, and the Boxer Rebellion.
Have teams of students debate both the positive and negative effects of imperialism, and on both Europe and the rest of the world.

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Resources for Teachers (Books/Articles, Visuals/Music)

Cohen, Robin. 1997. Global Diasporas. Seattle: University of Washington Press.

 

Curtin, Philip. 2000. The World and the West. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Ferguson, Niall. 2002. Empire: The Rise and Demise of the British World Order and the Lessons for Global Power. New York: Basic Books.

 

Hardt, Michael and Antonio Negri. 2000. Empire. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press

 

Headrick, Daniel R. 1981. The Tools of Empire: Technology and European Imperialism in the 19th Century. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Isichei, Elizabeth. 1997. A History of African Societies to 1870. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

Miyazaki, Ichisada and Conrad Schirokauer, trans. 1981. China's Examination Hell: The Civil Service Examinations of Imperial China. New Haven: Yale University Press.

 

Shirokauer, Connad. 2005. A Brief History of Chinese Civilization. New York: City University of New York.

 

Imperialism

Berberoglu, Berch. 1987. The Internationalization of Capital: Imperialism and Capitalist Development on a World Scale. New York: Praeger Publishers.

 

Cell, John Whitson. 1992. Hailey: A Study in British Imperialism, 1872-1969. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Coble, Parks M. 1991. Facing Japan: Chinese Politics and Japanese Imperialism, 1931-1937. Council on East Asian Studies. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, Distributed by Harvard University Press.

 

Hamson, Robert T. 1995. Gladstone's Imperialism in Egypt: Techniques of Domination. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

 

Harrison, Mark. 1999. Climates & Constitutions: Health, Race, Environment, and British Imperialism in India, 1600-1850. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Hevia, James Louis. 2003. English Lessons: The Pedagogy of Imperialism in Nineteenth-century China. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

 

Jennings, John M. 1997. The Opium Empire: Japanese Imperialism and Drug Trafficking in Asia. New YorkPraeger Publishers.

 

Johnson, G. Wesley. 1985. Double Impact: France and Africa in the Age of Imperialism. Westport, CT: Greenwood.

 

Magubane, Bernard. 1996. The Making of a Racist State: British Imperialism and the Union of South Africa, 1875-1910. Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press.

 

Offiong, Daniel A. 1982. Imperialism and Dependency: Obstacles to African Development. Washington, DC: Howard University Press.

 

Peffer, Nathaniel. 1972. The White Man's Dilemma: Climax of The Age of Imperialism. Manchester, NH: Ayer Company Publishers.

 

Shannon, Richard. 1974. The Crisis of Imperialism, 1865-1915. Southampton, UK: Paladin.

 

Vickery, Kenneth Powers. 1986. Black and White in Southern Zambia: The Tonga Plateau Economy and British Imperialism, 1890-1939. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

 

Wait, Eugene M. 2003. Imperialism. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

 

Watts, S. J. (Sheldon J.) 1997. Epidemics and History: Disease, Power, and Imperialism. New York: Yale University Press.

 

Wide Angle: Window Into Global History (PBS)

"This Land is Our Land" http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/wideangle/lessonplans/thisland/index.html


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Assessments

Editor's Note: All state examinations are aligned to the New York State Learning Standards for Social Studies and Social Studies Resource Guide with Core Curriculum. The chart below specifies where these alignments have occurred (from June 2000 to the present).

Core Curriculum: Global History and Geography Regents:
1. Reasons for imperialism—nationalistic, political, economic, “The White Man’s Burden,” Social Darwinism
2. Spatial characteristics—“new imperialism”
3. British in India
  a.

British East India Company

  b.

Sepoy Mutiny

4. British, French, Belgians, and Germans in Africa
  a.

Scramble for Africa

  b.

The Congress of Berlin

  c. African resistance—Zulu Empire
  d. Boer War
  e. Cecil Rhodes
  f. 19th-century anti-slave trade legislation

5.

European spheres of influence in China
  a. Opium Wars (1839 - 1842 and 1858 - 1860) and the Treaty of Nanjing
   

1) Unequal treaties

2) Extraterritoriality

  b. Boxer Rebellion
  c. Sun Yat-sen (Sun Yixian) and the Chinese Revolution (1910-1911)
6. Multiple perspectives toward imperialism
  a. Immediate/long-term changes made under European rule
  b. Long-term effects in Europe and the rest of the world
June 2004 DBQ, British Imperialism and Colonial Rule

January 2006 DBQ, Imperialism

June 2006 Thematic, Conflict

3. British in India
g. Responses to industrialization
 

5) Sadler Report and reform legislation

August 2006 Thematic, Movement of Peo


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