C&I

Curriculum and Instruction

Standard 1, Key Idea 4

Key Idea 4: The skills of historical analysis include the ability to: explain the significance of historical evidence; weigh the importance, reliability, and validity of evidence; understand the concept of multiple causation; understand the importance of changing and competing interpretations of different historical developments.

Performance Indicators--Students will:

Elementary

  • consider different interpretations of key events and/or issues in history and understand the differences in these accounts
  • explore different experiences, beliefs, motives, and traditions of people living in their neighborhoods, communities, and State
  • view historic events through the eyes of those who were there, as shown in their art, writings, music, and artifacts.

Intermediate

  • consider the sources of historic documents, narratives, or artifacts and evaluate their reliability
  • understand how different experiences, beliefs, values, traditions, and motives cause individuals and groups to interpret historic events and issues from different perspectives
  • compare and contrast different interpretations of key events and issues in New York State and United States history and explain reasons for these different accounts
  • describe historic events through the eyes and experiences of those who were there. (Taken from National Standards for History for Grades K-4)

Commencement

  • analyze historical narratives about key events in New York State and United States history to identify the facts and evaluate the authors’ perspectives
  • consider different historians’ analyses of the same event or development in United States history to understand how different viewpoints and/or frames of reference influence historical interpretations
  • evaluate the validity and credibility of historical interpretations of important events or issues in New York State or United States history, revising these interpretations as new information is learned and other interpretations are developed. (Adapted from National Standards for United States History)
Last Updated: April 24, 2009