C&I

Curriculum and Instruction

Standard 2, Key Idea 4

Key Idea 4: The skills of historical analysis include the ability to investigate differing and competing interpretations of the theories of history, hypothesize about why interpretations change over time, explain the importance of historical evidence, and understand the concepts of change and continuity over time.

Performance Indicators--Students will:

Elementary

  • consider different interpretations of key events and developments in world history and understand the differences in these accounts
  • explore the lifestyles, beliefs, traditions, rules and laws, and social/cultural needs and wants of people during different periods in history and in different parts of the world
  • view historic events through the eyes of those who were there, as shown in their art, writings, music, and artifacts

Intermediate

  • explain the literal meaning of a historical passage or primary source document, identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led up to these developments, and what consequences or outcomes followed (Taken from National Standards for World History)
  • analyze different interpretations of important events and themes in world history and explain the various frames of reference expressed by different historians
  • view history through the eyes of those who witnessed key events and developments in world history by analyzing their literature, diary accounts, letters, artifacts, art, music, architectural drawings, and other documents
  • investigate important events and developments in world history by posing analytical questions, selecting relevant data, distinguishing fact from opinion, hypothesizing cause-and-effect relationships, testing these hypotheses, and forming conclusions

Commencement

  • identify historical problems, pose analytical questions or hypotheses, research analytical questions or test hypotheses, formulate conclusions or generalizations, raise new questions or issues for further investigation
  • interpret and analyze documents and artifacts related to significant developments and events in world history
  • plan and organize historical research projects related to regional or global interdependence
  • analyze different interpretations of important events, issues, or developments in world history by studying the social, political, and economic context in which they were developed; by testing the data source for reliability and validity, credibility, authority, authenticity, and completeness; and by detecting bias, distortion of the facts, and propaganda by omission, suppression, or invention of facts (Taken from National Standards for World History)
Last Updated: April 24, 2009