C&I

Curriculum and Instruction

Standard 5, Key Idea 1

Key Idea 1: The study of civics, citizenship, and government involves learning about political systems; the purposes of government and civic life; and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place regarding power, authority, governance, and law. (Adapted from The National Standards for Civics and Government, 1994)

Performance Indicators--Students will:

Elementary

  • know the meaning of key terms and concepts related to government, including democracy, power, citizenship, nation-state, and justice
  • explain the probable consequences of the absence of government and rules
  • describe the basic purposes of government and the importance of civic life
  • understand that social and political systems are based upon people’s beliefs
  • discuss how and why the world is divided into nations and what kinds of governments other nations have

Intermediate

  • analyze how the values of a nation affect the guarantee of human rights and make provisions for human needs
  • consider the nature and evolution of constitutional democracies
  • explore the rights of citizens in other parts of the hemisphere and determine how they are similar to and different from the rights of American citizens
  • analyze the sources of a nation’s values as embodied in its constitution, statutes, and important court cases

Commencement

  • analyze how the values of a nation and international organizations affect the guarantee of human rights and make provisions for human needs
  • consider the nature and evolution of constitutional democracies throughout the world
  • compare various political systems with that of the United States in terms of ideology, structure, function, institutions, decision-making processes, citizenship roles, and political culture
  • identify and analyze advantages and disadvantages of various governmental systems
Last Updated: April 27, 2009