CTE

Career & Technical Education

CTE Data FAQ

Reporting Basics

  1. Who should report CTE data in SIRS?
  2. How are CTE students identified for reporting purposes?
  3. Why must districts report CTE data?
  4. What is a CTE Program?
  5. What is a cohesive concentration?

 Identifying CTE courses and programs: accurately reporting  the elements required in CTE program records

  1. Where should we begin when trying to determine which courses are CTE?
  2. What if a school is not certain if a course is included in one of the six CTE content areas?
    7a.  Which teachers are certified in CTE? [4/20/10]
  3. When is a CTE program service record needed in SIRS reporting?
  4. What is a General CTE program?
  5. What is a Title II Program?
  6. How do you determine if a student should be reported as Title II?
  7. What is meant by a CTE program being “Approved” or “Endorsed”?
  8. Update 3/9/11 I don’t have any New York State Approved programs; do I still need to report students who take all of their CTE courses in their high school?

 CTE Program Service Record Details: Codes that describe a CTE student’s program; examples of students who are counted as CTE students

  1. Who is the “service provider”?
  2. What must be reported on these student records in SIRS?

Classification of Instruction Codes/ program service codes

  1. How is the appropriate CTE program service code determined?
  1. I am reporting CTE students who take all of their CTE in the local high school and cannot find a CIP code in the SIRS manual that works with our programs. Are there CIP codes that should be used for programs offered at the local high school CTE data reporting?
  2. New 7/12/11 Some students were enrolled in several types of CTE courses in previous years but never were "concentrators" in any one area.
  3. What CIP code should I use for CFM?
  4. What CIP code should I use for an exploratory or multi-occupational course?
  5. Can a BOCES or technical high school use one of the more broad-based CIP codes?

How and what to count

  1. How do you record a student’s CTE data when the student takes CTE over multiple years and how is it recorded if those years are not sequential?
  2. New 7/12/11 What is the appropriate reason for ending code for students who take only one or two CTE courses?
  3. New 7/12/11 What should we do when there is no CTE program service record open in a student's senior year?
  4. Are students taking a Careers and Financial Management (CFM) course at the local high school counted as CTE students?
  5. Do music and art classes count as CTE? There are CIP codes for each of them.
  6. Can Design and Drawing for Production (DDP) counted as CTE?
  7. Can DDP be counted as CTE when it is taught by an art teacher?
    22a.  Which CTE teachers are certified to teach DDP? [4/23/10]
  1. Can DDP be counted as CTE when the student is not using it to meet the one unit of art/music graduation requirement?
  2. Are all Project Lead the Way students CTE students?
  3. Does the 20-week required Health Education course count as CTE?
  4. Do I report 7th and 8th grade CTE students?
  5. Should adult students (i.e., those with a high school diploma or a GED) in CTE be reported through SIRS?  
  6. Are students in an exploratory or multi-occupational course at the BOCES counted as CTE students?
  7. How is the level of program intensity determined?
  8. When must the level of program intensity be reported?
  9. New 7/12/11 Must the program intensity level be updated each time there is a change?

Reporting Basics

  1. Who should report CTE data in SIRS? 
  1. How are CTE students identified for reporting purposes?

All school districts with students in CTE must enter, in SIRS, program service records for such students.  The school district accountable for the student is responsible for this reporting even if the district’s students receive their CTE at another program service provider (e.g., BOCES).

CTE students are those enrolled in any course that can be a part of a CTE cluster (i.e., agriculture, business and marketing, family and consumer sciences, health occupations, trade and technical education and/or technology education). This includes students enrolled in:

  • a local high school,
  • a BOCES,
  • an alternative education and a CTE program,
  • an approved GED program (AHSEPP or HSEPP) and a CTE program, or
  • a CTE program in a nonpublic school that participates in data reporting via the SIRS.
  • Non-public schools that participate in SIRS
  1. Why must districts report CTE data?

New York State receives approximately $38 million in Perkins funding for secondary students.  Each district is allocated a share of these funds based on a formula that uses census data concerning concentrations of school aged-children, with added weight given to economic need. Districts having allocations over $15,000 can access their funds directly if they meet New York State requirements (found in application materials each year, see application for first time application at: www.p12.nysed.gov/cte/perkins4/
Schools whose allocations are below $15,000 cannot access funds directly, but must use the funds in locally formed consortia. The funds benefit all participating members of the consortia. Some consortia are made up of several school districts, but the majority of consortia are made up of a BOCES and its component districts. Any district assigning its allocation to a BOCES is a participating member of a Perkins consortium.

  1. What is a CTE Program?

CTE programs are comprised of at least three CTE courses or units of study that together form a cohesive concentration.  Located in high schools and BOCES, CTE programs provide academic and technical instruction in the content areas of

  1. agriculture,
  2. business and marketing,
  3. family and consumer sciences,
  4.  health occupations,
  5. trade and technical education,
  6. and/or technology education.

Cohesive concentrations are groups of courses or units of study that when combined make up a program.  These courses or units of study may be from a single CTE content area, or from a combination of content areas.  These programs may be provided with supplemental federal funding from the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006 (Perkins IV).
All CTE programs are categorized for reporting purposes as General CTE and Title II CTE.

  1. What is a cohesive concentration?

The CTE office has broadened the definition of “CTE program” to better reflect the nature of statewide participation of all CTE students, not just those in the technical high schools or BOCES.  The new definition, “CTE programs are comprised of at least three CTE courses, or units of study that together form a cohesive concentration,” widens the universe of students to be reported as CTE students. Since programs can be comprised of courses from a single CTE content area, or from a combination of content areas, the new definition includes students who, in essence, build their own programs. The expansion of the definitional boundaries reinforces the Perkins IV emphasis on “all aspects of the industry.” Students use the CTE curriculum for reasons beyond technical skill attainment. As Hudson and Laird suggest, these students “trade depth of coursetaking within an occupation area for greater breadth of coursetaking across occupational areas (e.g., supplementing auto repair courses with business courses).” The inclusion of CTE students who build nonlinear and perhaps cross-discipline programs result in changes in data collection and reporting.

Lisa Hudson and Jennifer Laird, “New Indicators of High School Career/Technical Education Coursetaking: Class of 2005,” Statistics in Brief, (April 2009). Retrieved March 23,  2010, from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2009038
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Identifying CTE courses and programs: accurately reporting  the elements required in CTE program records

  1. Where should we begin when trying to determine which courses are CTE?

Begin by identifying all courses offered in Agricultural Education, Business and Marketing Education, Family and Consumer Sciences Education, Health Occupations Education, Technology Education, and Trade and Technical Education. This means that students in all of the above courses, not just those in programs approved under the 2001 Regents CTE policy, are reported as CTE students.  CTE courses are taught by teachers certified in these six CTE content areas.

  1. What if a school is not certain if a course is included in one of the six CTE content areas?

 

 

 

7a. Which teachers are certified in CTE?

The Basic Education Data System (BEDS) teaching assignment codes can be used as a guide. The BEDS teaching assignment codes are used in a yearly survey of all teachers to collect data on enrollment and teaching assignments vis-à-vis teacher certification areas. The BEDS teaching assignments codes are a useful guide because course titles are organized by CTE content area. They are available at:
www.p12.nysed.gov/irs/beds/2009/PMF/codes.html (see pages 5-7).


7 a. Teachers certified to teach Agricultural Education, Business and Marketing Education, Family and Consumer Sciences Education, Health Occupations Education, Technology Education, and Trade and Technical Education are CTE teachers. This means that certified CTE teachers are found at local high schools, BOCES, and technical high schools.

  1. When is a CTE program service record needed in SIRS reporting?

A program service record is needed for all students in any CTE, beginning with the first course or unit of study, who are also in a high school diploma-granting program or an approved GED program (i.e., AHSEPP or HSEPP):

  • whether the courses comprising the CTE program are federally funded or not,
  • whether the courses comprising the CTE program have been approved to allow the issuance of a Technical Endorsement or not,  [bookmark to TE below]
  • whether the courses comprising the CTE program is General or Title II.
  1. What is a General CTE program?

A General CTE program (note that the term “General CTE” has replaced the old term, “conventional CTE”) is comprised of organized educational activities completed at the secondary level at a local high school or a BOCES or both.  These activities include:
A) a minimum of three connected courses at a local high school or a BOCES or both that:

  • incorporate the Career Development and Occupational Studies (CDOS) Learning Standards;
  • include the content of the one unit state-developed Career and Financial Management course;
  • provide students with coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in current or emerging professions; and
  • may provide technical skill proficiency, an industry-recognized credential or a certificate; AND

B) competency-based applied learning that contributes to a student’s academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical skills, occupation-specific skills, and knowledge of all aspects of an industry, including entrepreneurship.

  1. What is a Title II Program?

A Title II program involves two years of secondary instruction followed by two years of specifically linked postsecondary instruction.  The Title II programs in New York State are funded through Title II of Perkins IV on a competitive basis and are also known as 2+2 programs, Tech Prep, or “Career Pathways.”  These programs, which contain all of the components of General CTE programs, can be distinguished from General CTE programs by two features:
1) These programs must contain an articulation agreement that is jointly established by secondary and postsecondary institutions.  The agreements are usually brokered by “Title II Centers,” established under Perkins IV and provide benefits to the student such as, college credit or waiver of certain college course requirements.
2) A Title II program requires students to sign a declaration evidencing their intent to follow a graduation plan that includes two years of postsecondary instruction and that results in completion of a two-year associate degree, certificate, or apprenticeship in a field related to their program of study.

  1. How do you determine if a student should be reported as Title II?

The best way to determine if a student should be reported under Title II is to verify that he or she has signed a declaration with a Title II funded program.  Regional contacts can confirm if a student is in a Title II program. For more information see the Title II web page at: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/cte/perkins4/title2/title2contacts.html . If the Regional contact or local high school district can verify that a declaration has been signed and the other criteria are met, then the student would be coded as a Title II student.  If not, then he or she would be coded General CTE.

  1. What is meant by a CTE program being “Approved” or “Endorsed”?

This term refers to whether or not the specific program has been approved to allow the issuance of a technical endorsement on the student’s high school diploma.  Completion of the “New York State Regents CTE Approval Process” by individual CTE programs allows a school district to issue a Technical Endorsement on a student’s high school diploma when that student successfully completes all the requirements of such a program (For more information about the approval process see  www.p12.nysed.gov/cte/ctepolicy/ )  A list of programs that hold current NYSED approval to issue technical endorsements can be found at:  http://www.p12.nysed.gov/cte/ctepolicy/approved.html .
This data is entered in SIRS by the Level 1 operators and not by the reporting local educational agency.  School districts should contact their Regional Information Center (RIC) for further information.  If need be, the RIC can contact the NYSED CTE Team at 518-486-1547 or emsccte@mail.nysed.gov for assistance.

  1. I don’t have any New York State Approved programs; do I still need to report students who take all of their CTE courses in their high school?

Yes, you must report all CTE students.  Most Career and Technical Education in the State is delivered in programs that have not received approval through the 2001 Regents CTE Policy. There are many students who build custom programs (i.e., cohesive concentrations) in their high schools by taking a series of courses in content areas (e.g., Business and Marketing or Family and Consumer Sciences); they are CTE students and should be reported as such.
The 2001 Regents CTE Policy permits districts to grant the CTE endorsement on a qualifying student’s diploma. The endorsement marks a level of student achievement; it does not mark the limits of what is counted as Career and Technical Education.

3/11 Update: As of program year 2010-11, Post-high shcool placement (still collected on a paper form) will track only those students who enrolled in Approved Programs. Schools that do not offer any approved programs will not be required to conduct a survey of CTE students to collect and report data about program outcomes (i.e., placement in employment, further education, military, etc). See update details at the post-high shcool placement page and related FAQ.

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CTE Program Service Record Details: Codes that describe a CTE student’s program; examples of students who are counted as CTE students

  1. Who is the “service provider”?

The agency that operates the CTE program is the service provider.  A school district offering CTE for its own students would be both the district responsible for reporting these program service records and the program service provider.  A school district that sends its students to a BOCES for CTE would be the district responsible for reporting these program service records but the BOCES would be identified as the program service provider. Thus, the responsibilities for all school districts include reporting CTE students served in their own high schools as well as reporting those sent to BOCES or other out-of-district providers.

  1. What must be reported on these student records in SIRS?

The New York State CTE data fields in the SIRS are governed by federal mandates, as some CTE programming receives federal funding from the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006 (Perkins). CTE reporting requirements are the same for all schools whether or not they use Perkins funding.
English and math performance levels, and graduation and high school completion rates are collected for No Child Left Behind (NCLB) accountability purposes, but are also necessary for CTE reporting. Students in any CTE program must have a CTE program service record that includes;

  1. an Entry Date, and if exited, an Exit Date with a Reason for Ending Code,
  2. the data elements associated with all CTE program services:
    1. CTE Program Type (i.e., General CTE or Title II), and
    2. CTE/Title II Program Intensity, and [link down to intensity chart]
  3. the assessment code 00199 “CTE/Title II Technical Skills Assessment” with the assessment outcome (P or F) if the student took the assessment associated with the CTE program he or she took.

Students who transfer from one CTE program to another during the school year or enroll in more than one CTE program in different locations during the school year must be reported with a separate record for each program.  For example two service records would be required for a student enrolled in business education in his or her high school and enrolled in a computer information technology at a BOCES. 

  1. How is the appropriate CTE program service code determined?

A list of Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) codes has been selected by NYSED for reporting purposes. These codes are taken from the National Center for Educational Statistics manual.  NYSED has selected a subset of these CIP codes that are appropriate for secondary level CTE programs.  Use the CIP code most closely reflects the curricula of the student’s CTE program.
As CTE programs at local high schools often cross content areas and may not be predefined or linear in nature and CTE students at local high schools build meaningful cohesive concentrations based on individual interests, the selection of a specific CIP code from Appendix 10 may prove more difficult than the selection of such a code for CTE programs at BOCES and Technical or CTE high schools.  In this case the local high school can use one of the more broad based CIP codes listed below. These reflect the six major CTE content areas.  If a student is in programs from two of these content areas, the code to be reported should be the one in which the majority of the student’s time is spent. The six content areas and their related CIP codes are:

  1. Agriculture; use CIP code 010599
  2. Business and Marketing; use CIP code 529999
  3. Family and Consumer Sciences; use CIP code 199999
  4. Health Occupations; use CIP code 519999
  5. Technology Education; use CIP code 151599
  6. Trade and Technical; use CIP code 489999

When a local agency is unable to determine the appropriate content area they should contact the NYSED CTE Team at 518-486-1547 or emsccte@mail.nysed.gov for assistance.

  1. I am reporting CTE students who take all of their CTE in the local high school and cannot find a CIP code in the SIRS manual that works with our programs. Are there CIP codes that should be used for programs offered at the local high school CTE data reporting? 

Yes. Local high school programs are often broad-based and need to use the following CIP codes:

    1. Agriculture: use CIP code 010599
    2. Business and Marketing: use CIP code 529999
    3. Family and Consumer Sciences: use CIP code 199999
    4. Health Occupations: use CIP code 519999
    5. Technology Education: use CIP code 151599
    6. Trade and Technical: use CIP code 489999 

If a student is in programs from two of these content areas in the same location, the code to be used should be the one in which the majority of the student’s time is spent. If the student spends equal time (as might be the case in 9th grade, for example); choose one CIP.  Performance data reported the U.S. Education Department is based on the student’s senior year, when data reporters will have the entire enrollment record to determine where the student spent most of his or her time.

  1. Some students were enrolled in several types of CTE courses in previous years but never were "concentrators" in any one area.

For example, they take the following one credit courses: technology course two years ago, business course last year and an engineering course this year. Do I enter the three CIP codes?.

No. They may have built a cohesive concentration—a custom program. These students are concentrators and should be coded as such. The only time you would use two CIP codes is if the student takes CTE in the high school and the BOCES. So, if a student takes all CTE in one location, there is only one CIP, the cohesive concentrations will be made up of more than one content area but, the system does not permit us to capture all of the detail.

If the student has earned three full credits in CTE he or she is concentrator. The decision regarding whether or not a course constitutes a cohesive concentration /program should be made by staff involved in guidance or CTE program development . After these determinations are made, data officers should be provided with those the clusters of courses that may be counted as "cohesive concentrations." Some districts limit cohesive concentrations to courses from two content areas (e.g., business and technology education).

  1. What CIP code should I use for CFM? 

Use the general Business and Marketing CIP code: 529999

  1. What CIP code should I use for an exploratory or multi-occupational course?

Use the general Trade and Technical CIP code: 489999

  1. Can a BOCES or technical high school use one of the more broad-based CIP codes?

Yes, a BOCES or technical high school would use the broad-based CIP codes for an exploratory or multi-occupational course. Most exploratory courses at a BOCES would use  the general Trade and Technical CIP code: 489999

  1. How do you record a student’s CTE data when the student takes CTE over multiple years and how is it recorded if those years are not sequential?

All students taking CTE have a CTE program service record created in the school year they first start CTE.  As with all program service records this is tied to the student’s enrollment record each year.
If the student is taking CTE over multiple years and has not completed or left the CTE program by the end of the first year, the student’s first year CTE program service record is left without a “Reason for Ending” code.
As in every year, and at the start of the following school year, each student has a new enrollment record created and that record has all the student’s program service records for that year attached to it. If a student continues a CTE program that did not have a “Reason for Ending” code at the end of the preceding year, a new CTE program service record is created for year 2 to reflect the student’s continuation in that CTE program.
If a student that began and did not complete or leave a CTE program in year 1 opts not to take CTE in year 2, no new CTE program service record is created in year 2.  If such a student then re-starts the same CTE program in year 3—in effect “skipping” year 2—a new program service record must be created at the start of year 3. This “skipping” will impact the Level of Intensity that needs to be recorded in year 3.  The entirety of the student’s CTE program should be considered when creating the new CTE program service record in year 3 using both year 1 and year 3 to determine intensity.

18a.
What is the appropriate reason for ending code for students who take only one or two CTE courses? Some of our seniors were enrolled in just one or two high school CTE courses this year,  Code 663 does not really describe their intention. They never wanted to complete a program, they just wanted to take two courses.

It is 663. At this time, we are limited to using only 663 or 664—they are not always a good fit when collecting CTE data. Student intent should not be a factor here.  It helps if decisions are made in sequence.

1.     Is the student a CTE student? If his or her enrollment record contains any CTE class either at BOCES or the high school , the answer is yes (all courses in Agriculture,  Business, Family and Consumer Sciences, Health Occupations, Trade and Tech, and Tech Ed count at CTE)
2.     Is the student an enrollee (1/2 credit or incomplete course), participant (1 credit already earned) or a concentrator ( 2 or more credits in CTE).
3.     If the student is not graduating/ or otherwise leaving school, the program service record can be left without an entry in the exit reason code/ reason for ending field. If the student is graduating / leaving  and has earned only two credits, then that student did not build a cohesive concentration, and did not complete a program—left program without completing is the correct entry for the reason for leaving field.

  1. When the students entire record is known, you will know how many credits in CTE the student has earned (note: some CTE courses are ½ credit, so a simple count of courses may not give you an accurate credit tally). Students with one credit are coded 663 because they have not reached sufficient intensity, they are still participants. While students with  two credits are concentrators, they have not completed the required three sequenced credits needed to achieve program completion.

18b.
We had some seniors who took several CTE courses over the past years and were reported as enrollees, participants or even concentrators, but not with a completion code of 646 since they had one or more years of school to complete and could have taken more courses. If they aren't enrolled in a course this year, what should we do?

 

It was correct to leave the program service code off the prior CTE records. Many students will have an open CTE program service record in their last year of school. For the student described above, a CTE program service record must be re-established for the purposes of entering the program completion code. Create a record in the senior year with an entry date at the start of the year and exit data one day later with a reason for ending code 646, completed program.  )

  1. Are students taking a Careers and Financial Management (CFM) course at the local high school counted as CTE students? 

Yes

  1. Do music and art classes count as CTE? There are CIP codes for each of them.

In local high schools, no. Music and art classes in a local high school are not considered Career and Technical Education because the career studies aspect is not present and they are not taught by certified CTE teachers.
In contrast, technical high schools for the arts (found in the largest districts in the State and some BOCES) provide technical instruction (the skills) and career instruction—all aspects of the industry. The career instruction and the technical instruction are a part of programs in these settings they are CTE. Teachers in the technical high schools for the arts are certified CTE teachers. CIP codes for the arts should only be used for programs at technical high schools for the arts.

  1. Can Design and Drawing for Production (DDP) be counted as CTE? 

Yes, DDP, when taught by a certified Technology Education (CTE) teacher,  is a CTE course and should be counted as such.

  1. Can DDP be counted as CTE when it is taught by an art teacher?

22a. Which CTE teachers are certified to teach DDP?

No. It must be taught by a certified CTE teacher. If DDP is taught by an art teacher the student receives only art credit
Only teachers certified in Technology Education can teach DDP.

  1. Can DDP be counted as CTE when the student is not using it to meet the one unit of art/music graduation requirement?

Yes. DDP, taught by a certified CTE teacher, can be counted as CTE whether or not a student uses it to meet graduation requirements.

  1. Are all Project Lead the Way students CTE students?

PLTW is a national program model to promote student interest in engineering. How the program is delivered differs from state to state. In New York State, PLTW falls under the regulations and policies for technology education. PLTW courses are generally taught by certified technology education teachers but not in all cases. This should be the deciding factor in determining whether PLTW students are CTE students. All pre-engineering programs approved under the 2001 Regents Policy on CTE  must utilize New York State certified technology education teachers. For information on engineering-related courses or programs in grades 9-12 please see http://www.p12.nysed.gov/cte/technology/engineer.html or call the CTE program office at 518-486-1547.

  1. Does the 20-week required Health Education course count as CTE?

No, the career studies aspect is not present and they are not taught by certified CTE teachers.

  1. Do I report 7th and 8th grade CTE students?

No. Report students in grades 9-12 only.

  1. Should adult students (i.e., those with a high school diploma or a GED) in CTE be reported through SIRS?  

No.   People who take CTE as adult students (usually for a fee) are not reported in SIRS.

  1. Are students in an exploratory or multi-occupational course at the BOCES counted as CTE students? 

Yes

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  1. How is the level of program intensity determined?

Program intensity is a measure of the student’s progression through his or her CTE program.  While CTE programming in BOCES and Technical or CTE high schools (found in the larger districts in the state) is usually predefined or linear in nature CTE programming in local high schools often crosses content areas and may not be predefined or linear.  CTE students at local high schools build meaningful cohesive concentrations based on individual interests.  The following tables offer guidance on how to make this determination for CTE programs at local high schools and those at BOCES and Technical or CTE high schools:

Local High Schools


 

General CTE
A student who has…

Title II
A student who has…

Enrollee

…begun instruction in the any CTE course or unit of study

…signed a Title II declaration form stating his or her intent to follow a Title II program, and who has begun instruction in at least one course or unit of study in the secondary education component (academic or CTE) of a Title II program.

Participant

… …successfully completed, as determined by the program service provider, at least one course or unit of study in a CTE program as part of a cohesive concentration and who has enrolled or plans to enroll in a second course/unit of study.

…successfully completed at least one course or unit of study in the CTE component of the Title II program.

Concentrator

… successfully completed, as determined by the program service provider, two courses/units of study out of a three course/unit of study that together form a cohesive concentration; OR who has successfully completed, as determined by the program service provider, three courses/units of study out of a four or more course/unit of study CTE program.

…successfully completed two courses or units of study in the secondary CTE component of a Title II program.

BOCES or Technical/CTE High Schools


 

General CTE
A student who has…

Title II
A student who has…

Enrollee

begun any CTE course or unit of study.

…signed a Title II declaration form stating his or her intent to follow a Title II program, and who has begun instruction in at least one course or unit of study in the secondary education component (academic or CTE) of a Title II program.

Participant

completed one-third of his or her program.,
(In the case of a BOCES two-year program 27 weeks = 1/3)

…successfully completed, as determined by the BOCES or technical/CTE high school, at least 1/3 of the CTE component of a Title II program.

Concentrator

completed two-thirds of his or her program.
(In the case of a BOCES two-year program 54 weeks= 2/3)

…successfully completed, as determined by the BOCES or technical/CTE high school at least 2/3 of the CTE component of a Title II program.

  1. When must the level of program intensity be reported?

As the student reaches each level, the student’s record should be updated.  As this may prove problematic, program intensity should be reported, at least, as of the day the student leaves the program, either because they drop the program or because they complete the program, or as of the end of the school year, whichever comes first. 

  • If the student dropped the program, the Reason for Ending Code would be 663 and the Level of Program Intensity would be the level reached by the day the student left the program.  
  • If the student completed the program, the Reason for Ending code would be 646 and the Level of Program Intensity would be “Concentrator” as all completers have, by definition, passed through all the intensity levels.
  • the Reason for Ending code can be left blank and the Level of Program Intensity would be the level reached by the last day of the school year.

30 a.
Must the program intensity level be updated each time there is a change?

No. At this time, there is no need to enter the data more than once a year since we  are required to submit only end-of-year reports to the federal education department. Report the highest level achieved at the end of the school year.

   

 

Last Updated: July 14, 2011