THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK / ALBANY, NY 12234

 

TO:

The Honorable the Members of the Board of Regents

FROM:

James A. Kadamus

COMMITTEE:

EMSC-VESID

TITLE OF ITEM:

Career and Technical Education Policy Review

DATE OF SUBMISSION:

November 30, 2004

PROPOSED HANDLING:

Discussion

RATIONALE FOR ITEM:

Review of Regents Policy

STRATEGIC GOAL:

Goals 1 and 2

AUTHORIZATION(S):

 

 

SUMMARY:

 

            On the 24-month calendar, the Board is scheduled to review the Regents policy on Career and Technical Education (CTE).  Attachment A is the research evaluation report of the CTE policy from MAGI Educational Services, Inc.

 

            Attachment B provides supplementary information from the Department on program approvals, student performance, enrollment trends, and next steps.

 

            Attachment C includes data submitted by the New York City Department of Education regarding all CTE programs, approved CTE programs and those pending approval.          

 

 

Attachments

 


ATTACHMENT A

                                                                                    ATTACHMENT B

 

 

Career and Technical Education Evaluation

 

I.                                                          Policy Overview

 

In February 2001, the New York State Board of Regents approved its policy on Career and Technical Education.  The policy was aligned with high school graduation requirements and provided an additional pathway to meet these requirements.  The policy had a two-fold purpose:

 

·        Promote and upgrade career and technical education programs; and

·        Provide greater flexibility and access in curriculum and courses for high school students who want to pursue CTE programs to meet graduation requirements.

 

The Department developed an implementation guide which outlined the approval process.  In order to promote and upgrade CTE programs, the issues of teacher certification, technical assessment, postsecondary articulation and work-skills employability profiles were focal points of the policy.  To aid in the promotion of flexibility of programming, the policy allowed for the use of integrated and specialized academic courses.  The overall effectiveness was enhanced by the inclusion of business/education representatives, community leaders, parents, union representatives as well as other stakeholders on the self-study and external review committees.

 

This policy is not a mandate, but an option for school districts and BOCES to provide quality CTE programs with flexibility in their delivery.  The CTE program approval applications are generated by school districts/BOCES boards of education using rigorous criteria and are approved by SED.  Students that complete an approved CTE program and pass an appropriate technical assessment receive a technical endorsement affixed to their high school diploma.  Students receiving this endorsement have met all applicable graduation requirements, including the passage of five required Regents examinations.

 

            In New York State, CTE programs are offered in local education agencies, BOCES, and comprehensive high schools.  Programs are available in Arts/Humanities, Business/Information Systems, Health Services, Engineering/Technologies, Human and Public Services and Natural and Agricultural Sciences.  These content areas are covered in detail in Standard 3B of the Career Development and Occupational Studies (CDOS) Learning Standards.

 

The CTE policy has been in place for the past three years.  The review of the policy includes an independent evaluation by MAGI Educational Services, Inc. and is supplemented by information on student achievement and enrollments from SED databases of Career and Technical Education Data System (CTEDS) and the System for Tracking Education Performance (STEP).

 

            The State Education Department contracted with MAGI Educational Services, Inc. to assess the extent to which the policy/program approval process fosters high quality career and technical education programs.  The MAGI evaluation report provides specific research-based information on student achievement, curriculum and instruction, and overall program quality.  The findings are from a survey of 611 approved CTE programs in the 38 BOCES and 12 local educational agencies (LEAs), as well as from 141 programs that had not applied for program approval.  In addition, focus group interviews were conducted in 14 different sites across the State along with classroom observations of approved CTE programs.  Three of the Big Five school districts (New York City, Buffalo, and Rochester) were included.  Syracuse and Yonkers are not included because they are not sufficiently along in the process for a valid assessment of results.    However, we have provided information on the Big 4 school districts based on data in our Career and Technical Education Data System (CTEDS) database.  The career and technical education program approval update shows that all BOCES Centers and about half of the LEAs with approved CTE programs were included in the survey.

 

II.                     Career and Technical Education Program Approvals

 

          As of November 29, 2004, 25 local education agencies and 38 BOCES have submitted certification forms to the Department requesting approval for career and technical education (CTE) programs A description of each career area is found in Appendix A.

 

CAREER AREA

Received

Approved

Arts/Humanities

 65

56

Business/Information Systems

125

87

Health Services

 92

75

Engineering/Technologies

323

           290

Human & Public Services

160

           149

Natural & Agricultural Sciences

50

             48

TOTALS

          815

           705

 

 

III.                                                        Student Performance

 

Data for Chart 1 below is a disaggregation of data from Table 4, page 35 of the MAGI report for New York City (NYC) and rest of state (ROS).    It should be noted that Table 4 lists New York State performance levels which reflect final agreed upon minimum performance levels for Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act 1998 for school year 2002-2003 identified by USDOE.  The performance level for academic skill attainment has since been increased and currently is at 72.95%.

 

The majority of students who completed a registered sequence of courses in CTE have achieved technical skill proficiency, passed a technical assessment, and have been successfully placed.  The evaluation report provides specific information in academic skill attainment.

 

 

 
 
 
Student Performance in Approved CTE Programs in 2002-2003

in NYC and Rest of State (ROS)

 

Chart 1

 

 

 

 

 

Measurement Definitions

Academic Skill Attainment

Vocational/

Technical Skill Attainment

Technical Assessment Takers

Technical Assessment Passers

Placement

Percent of CTE completers who passed all applicable Regents exams

Percent of CTE completers who achieved an average of 75% in CTE courses

Percent of CTE completers who took an industry-defined technical exam

Percent of CTE completers who passed an industry-defined technical exam

Percent of CTE completers/graduates who were successfully placed in postsecondary education, the military, or employment

NYC

ROS

NYC

ROS

NYC

ROS

NYC

ROS

NYC

ROS

Approved CTE Programs

95%

74%

57%

76%

67%

69%

79%

73%

29%

80%

Students w/ disabilities in approved CTE Programs

0.5%

64%

0.7%

74%

1.6%

53%

0%

32%

0%

91%

 

 

            Charts 2-4 show the performance of CTE completers in the Big 4 school districts, the State as a whole and in selected high schools.

 

Performance of June 2003 CTE Completers on Applicable Regents Examinations in Big 4 School Districts

 

Chart 2

 

District

Number of CTE Completers

Number of CTE Completers Passing All Applicable Regents Exams

Buffalo

812

557 (68.59%)

Rochester

711

711 (100%)

Syracuse

495

438 (88.48%)

Yonkers

741

427 (57.62%)

 Statewide

33,930

28,723 (84.65%)

 

 

Percentage of Students in the 2000 Cohort in Sample

CTE High Schools Scoring 65 or Above

on ELA Regents Examination According to 2003-04 STEP*

 

Chart 3

 

High School

CTE

Non-CTE

 

McKinley HS

Buffalo

 

 

76.3%

 

 

60.3%

 

Edison Tech

Rochester

 

 

51.2%

 

 

13.2%

 

Saunders Tech

Yonkers

 

 

68.5%

 

 

52.5%

 

Henninger HS

Syracuse

 

 

60.0%

 

 

42.9%

 

 

Percentage of Students in the 2000 Cohort in Sample

CTE High Schools Scoring 65 or Above

on Math Regents Examination According to 2003-04 STEP*

 

Chart 4

 

High School

CTE

Non-CTE

 

McKinley HS

Buffalo

 

 

33%

 

 

31%

 

Edison Tech

Rochester

 

 

64.6%

 

 

14.3%

 

Saunders Tech

Yonkers

 

 

94.5%

 

 

90.2%

 

Henninger HS

Syracuse

 

 

20.0%

 

 

18.5%

 

*Includes Tech Prep students within CTE programs.

 

 


 

IV.                                                       Enrollment Trends

 

            Enrollment data is from the Career and Technical Education Data System (CTEDS) for (1) total student enrollment in CTE programs in the Big Five school districts, BOCES, and the rest of the state including LEAs, and (2) for comparative enrollment patterns in matched program clusters.

 

Total Career and Technical Education Enrollments in Big 5 and BOCES

2001-02 to 2003-2004 School Years

 

 

District

 

2001-02

 

2002-03

 

2003-04

% Change
2001-04

Buffalo

6,932

6,374

6,351

-8%

Rochester

5,423

7,960

6,729

24%

Syracuse

2,479

2,727

2,671

8%

New York City

116,458

118,892

109,388

-6%

Yonkers

5,209

4,239

4,844

-7%

Total BOCES

33,940

35,064

34,330

1%

Total State (including

LEAs)


243,864

 

272,679

 

258,342

 

6%

 

 

Enrollment by Program Clusters

 

            Comparative enrollment patterns in matched clusters between 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 show various shifts, some of which match job trends in New York State.  Increases in CTE enrollment, particularly in the technology and health care fields, were similar to projected job trends in the State.   These programs are leading students into careers rather than merely employment.  This is significant for economic growth and sustainable wages as they move into careers.

 

·        The greatest increase in CTE enrollment occurred in business programs (44%), followed by technology and communications (15%).  The computer technology field ranks #1 in statewide job growth projections.

 

·        The increase in health care enrollment (10%) is reflective of a pattern in the statewide health care industry: medical assistants, home care aides, and physical therapy aides are featured in the top 10 fastest growing jobs.

 

·        There were decreases in CTE enrollment in trade and industry (-1%) and child care  (-4%).

 

·        In New York City, there was a 211% increase in enrollment in the approved Business program, and a 55% increase in the three registered Technology and Communications programs. 

 

In the area of CTE enrollment by gender, race, and special education status for

selected program clusters, survey data is for the 2003-2004 school year.  A total of 328 CTE programs were surveyed. The findings indicate the following:

 

·        The greatest gender disparity in enrollment was in the Personal and Other Services cluster (1% males; 99% females), largely accounted for by females enrolled in Cosmetology programs.

 

·        The least gender difference occurred in Business programs where the ratio of males to females was 48% to 52%, respectively.

 

·        Overall, gender differences of at least 28% occurred in seven out of ten program clusters.

 

·        Racial differences existed in all program clusters.  Enrollments were dominated by White students in all but Business programs, where more African-American students (42%) were enrolled than both White (29%) and Hispanic (20%) students.

 

·        Special education students were under-represented in all CTE program clusters. The greatest disparity occurred in the Business program cluster (85% general education; 15% special education), and the least in the Agriculture and Renewable Resources cluster (66% general education; 34% special education).

 

Collectively, these data indicate that enrollment patterns in approved CTE programs reflect trends that are historically typical of career and technical programs: nontraditional enrollment (where less than 25% of the gender is employed in the occupational field) was low, as was the inclusion of students with disabilities.  Racial distribution most often was regarded as a function of the local demographics and therefore not attributable to inherent program characteristics.  

 

 

V.                                                                    Next Steps

 

Based on the independent evaluation and staff analysis, we have identified six major areas that will be the focus for future directions for CTE in New York State.

 

1.      Program Improvement/Professional Development

 

The majority of the CTE programs will continue to refine their components through professional development for staff, securing appropriate certification for staff, and postsecondary articulation with institutions of higher learning.  Given that all CTE programs have been in operation for no more than three years, program improvement will continue to be an ongoing feature.  Professional development needs to center on academic and technical content integration and the involvement of academic teachers should continue to be a priority of CTE administrators. 

 

 

2.      The Middle-Level Connection

 

For CTE programs to contribute to raising student achievement and improving knowledge and understanding of the inter-relations of good citizenship and career skills development, school districts/BOCES must pursue effective strategies for increasing awareness of the CTE pathway in the middle schools.  There was evidence in the survey findings that school districts and BOCES had not launched a credible public relations effort directed toward middle school students, their guidance counselors, and their parents.  One of the creative strategies that school districts/BOCES could employ for recruitment in the middle schools could be the use of follow-up data on CTE graduates.   

 

3.      Non-Participating Districts

 

To achieve full participation by all school districts/BOCES, additional technical assistance will be required to remove obstacles to participation by these school districts.  About 80% of the non-participating, district-based CTE programs surveyed had no plans to apply for approval.  Some of the reasons cited included, but are not limited to, perception of uncertainty as to what the benefits/added value would be and insufficiency of resources.  Other reasons cited were lack of awareness of the CTE policy, satisfaction with their current level of participation through the local BOCES centers, and difficulties in getting integrated academic credit approved by their central administration.  These are areas of further technical assistance for the Department.

 

4.      Technical Assistance

 

Technical assistance requests, in some cases, exceeded SED staff capacity.  Decisions on technical assistance delivery to the field was based on high need districts.  Those to whom we did not have capacity to provide technical assistance were directed to the SED website.  A complete Implementation Guide with necessary forms is also available on this site.  A team of staff members went to New York City, Buffalo and Yonkers July-September 2004 to provide on-site assistance with policy components and curriculum and to improve their participation in the CTE process.  Staff also meets quarterly with both the Association of Career and Technical Education (ACTE) and Big 5 CTE Directors to address any problems and new developments. Telephone and e-mail contacts are on-going to all approved prospective programs.  Based on SED staff discussions, site visits to approved programs and information gained through conversations with the field, we have refined our internal protocols which has in some cases been misinterpreted as policy changes on our part.  Further adjustments will be made as a result of the independent evaluation report.  Efforts will continue to increase the number of LEA CTE programs taking advantage of the flexibility allowed within this policy.  In addition, technical assistance efforts will continue with Yonkers, Buffalo and New York City.

5.      Big Five

 

In addition to ongoing technical assistance, staff will focus their attention on strategies to reverse declining enrollments that have been reported in specific schools within the Big Five districts.  Further upgrading and expanding the scope of high quality programs, through the CTE approval process, is one of the approaches currently being used to address the declining enrollment trend.

 

Information from New York City indicates that enrollment has increased in most of their CTE schools while some students are opting out of CTE schools to attend theme-based small schools.  Emphasis will be placed on working with these CTE schools to become state-of-the-art educational facilities and remain competitive both academically and technically.

 

6.      Re-Registration Process

 

The Department is developing a process to re-register programs at the end of five years.  This process, to be developed in collaboration with the approved programs, will help to maintain program quality and continuous improvement.

 

7.      Data Collection

 

This will be ongoing in the areas of student performance, technical assessments, enrollment, and placement in participating school districts/BOCES.  An effort will be made to maintain a comparative approach in all phases of data gathering for students enrolled in CTE versus those not enrolled in the program.

 

8.      Continued Analyses

 

Continued work will be done with the independent evaluator, MAGI, in the following areas:

 

·        Comparative study of CTE dropouts versus dropouts in the general school population;

·        Comparative study of performance on Regents examinations for CTE students versus those in the general school population; and

·        Tracking completion of first semester work of CTE students at postsecondary institutions compared to the general school population.

 

Information and data from any or all of these items when completed will assist staff in providing appropriate technical assistance to school districts/BOCES in program development.

 

 



 


 

                                                                                                                        Appendix A

 

Description of Career Development and Occupational Studies (CDOS)

Career Cluster Areas

 

            The Career Development and Occupational Studies (CDOS) Learning Standards include Career Development, Integrated Learning, Foundation Skills and Career Cluster Areas.  Students who choose to study in any of the career cluster areas will acquire the career-specific technical knowledge/skills necessary to progress toward gainful employment, career advancement, and success in postsecondary programs.  The six career areas are:

 

Arts/Humanities -- The Arts/Humanities career cluster area provides information and key ideas that are often applicable across several disciplines, i.e., visual arts, dance, music, theatre, etc.  Program examples include television production, dramatic arts, graphic design, etc.

 

Business/Information Systems -- The general performance indicators and performance tasks for the Business/Information Systems career cluster areas are centered on knowledge and skill requirements essential to all business enterprises.  These include basic business foundations, business-related technology, information management/communications, business systems, resource management, and interpersonal skills.  Program examples include computer networking, website design/operations, finance, etc.

 

Engineering/Technologies -- The Engineering/Technologies career cluster area is organized on the bases of student understanding of technological systems, engineering/industrial processes and attainment of skills related to specific technologies.  Program examples include automotive technology, fiber optics, heating/ventilation/air-conditioning, etc.

 

Health Services -- Occupational careers in Health Services are broadly defined as Therapeutic, Diagnostic, Information Services and General Services.  Program examples include practical nursing, medical assisting, dental assisting, etc.

 

Human and Public Service -- Careers in Human and Public Service are classified within the general areas of ethical/legal responsibilities, communications, sanitation, human growth and development, interpersonal dynamics, safety, personal resource management, and human wellness.  Program examples include police science, child development/care, travel and tourism, etc.

 

Natural and Agricultural Sciences -- Educational experiences in the Natural and Agricultural Sciences career cluster area are classified within general areas such as basic agricultural foundations, agricultural-related technology, agricultural information and business management, and agricultural systems.  Program examples include horticulture, veterinary assistant, forestry, etc.


 

                                                                                                                        ATTACHMENT C

Information Submitted by New York City Department of Education

 

1.      Enrollment trends in CTE programs over last 5 years

Within our 18 CTE schools, there were 3,046 students that comprised the 1998 Cohort (class of 2002). Enrollment has steadily increased in most schools.

2.      Effect of the small school movement in NYC on CTE programs -performance of CTE students on Regents exams and for high school graduation

·        The small school movement in New York City provides students with additional choices and may result in alleviating overcrowding in larger CTE schools. Those small schools that are theme-based and offer students career education programs will provide students that attend these schools an opportunity to achieve academic success and to develop their career goals. As the numbers of small schools increase and students are provided with additional choices, we may find that this will lead to a decrease in the number of students selecting CTE schools as their school of choice. This may result in lower registration at these schools if they do not continually reinvent themselves to remain competitive. Thus far the effect has been minimal given the fact high school seats are at a premium in the city. 

 

·        Seven of our larger CTE high schools have adopted the Smaller Learning Community reform model in an effort to provide more personalized, academically rigorous, and relevant Career and Technical Education programs. These schools offer students the opportunity to participate in sequenced programs that are New York State approved, lead to advanced certifications and an endorsed Regents Diploma.  It is our hope that the reorganization of larger CTE high schools will result in students selecting a theme-based Smaller Learning Community and will enable them to achieve higher academic standards.

3.      Role of alternative high schools in CTE

·        Alternative high schools that have adopted the principles of Career and Technical Education, such as School of Co-op Technical Education, provide students with the opportunity to complete their academic course requirements and receive instruction in advanced technology programs. Students attend their zoned school for academic instruction and travel to the School of Co-op Technical Education and other schools like it to obtain technical training leading to industry certifications and enter high needs areas of employment as well as transition to post-secondary education.

 

·        Some alternative high schools provide courses in computer applications, culinary arts, and business education. It is our vision to promote sequenced Career and Technical Education programs in these schools to ensure SED certification.

 

·        Students attending alternative high schools where there are no CTE programs can attend CTE high schools in a shared instructional model to fulfill their CTE goals.

 

4.      Evaluations of CTE programs conducted by NYC 

Evaluations have led to changes, including the current movement to create smaller learning communities in many of the city’s CTE schools.

 

Smaller Learning Communities (SLC) and CTE

 

·        Create an opportunity for schools to re-invent themselves as smaller and more personal learning communities.

 

·        Our CTE programs overlap the SLC values of autonomy, identity, personalization, and instructional focus. These guide the SLC’s school’s plan for restructuring. Similar to SLC programs that provide for common staff development and programming, our CTE industry certification programs assist all teachers in developing new and effective teaching strategies.  Professional development workshops support teachers and administrators in providing learning environments that improve student achievement.

 

  1. Career and Technical Education Approval Process

 

The program approval process is in and of itself a great tool for evaluation of CTE programs.  To make students eligible for this option, school districts and BOCES must engage in a program approval process following State Education Department criteria. The career and technical education program approval application is first approved by school district/BOCES boards of education and is then eligible for final approval by the State Education Department. Department approval provides program flexibility and permits a Regents diploma with a technical endorsement for students completing the approved CTE program.

Criteria for the career and technical education program approval process require applicants to have evidence of:

-          quality technical and academic curriculum, including integrated English language arts, mathematics, science, economics, and government and technical instruction;

-          faculty with State certification in appropriate academic and/or technical fields;

-          technical assessments that certify students meet current industry standards;

-          postsecondary articulation agreements;

-          work-based learning experiences for students;

-          work skills employability profiles for students; and

-          data on student progress and performance to evaluate their success on Regents examinations or alternatives approved by the State Assessment panel, technical assessments and placement in employment, military, or higher education.

6.         Career and Technical Education Programs in New York City High Schools

Career Area

Program

Number of Programs

Agriculture

Agricultural Science

2

 

Horticulture

2

 

Arts

Animation/Cartooning

1

 

Computer Graphics

 

Fashion Design

3

 

Fashion Merchandizing and Design

1

 

Fine Arts

1

 

Graphic Communication Arts:

 

Commercial Offset Printing

2

 

Graphic Design

10

 

Graphic Illustration

2

 

Performing Arts:

1

 

Dance

3

 

Drama

1

 

Music

3

 

Technical Theater

3

 

Photography

2

 

Visual Arts

1

 

Film & Video

1

 

Visual Merchandizing

1

 

Studio Art

2

 

Business/Entrepreneurship

Business Administration

2

 

Accounting

1

 

College Accounting

2

 

Accounting/Entrepreneurship

4

 

Communication Media

2

 

National Academy Foundation Programs:

 

Academy of Information Technology (AOIT)

8

 

Academy of Finance (AOF)

13

 

Academy of Hospitality and Tourism (AOHT)

10

 

New Media/E-Commerce

12

 

Office Administration

1

 

Real Estate/Urban Planning

1

 Career Area

Program

Number of Programs

 

Virtual Enterprise (VE)

53

Culinary

Hotel and Hospitality

1

 

Restaurant Management

13

Construction Technology

Carpentry

2

Building Trades/Construction Technology

2

Electrical Installation

6

Electronics

2

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

2

Plumbing

2

Preservation Arts

1

Technical Theater Stagecraft Design

1

Health Careers & Allied Fields

Biomedical Technology

3

Cosmetology

Hair Care

4

Nail Salon

1

Dental Assisting (DA)

3

Dental Lab Technician

2

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)

2

Health Occupations Education CORE

2

Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN)

3

Nurse Assisting (NA)

9

Medical Billing & Coding

7

Medical Lab Technician

3

Medical Office Assistant (MA)

4

Oceanography

1

Optical Technology

7

Sports Medicine

1

Veterinary Science

2

Journalism

News Media

11

Law

Court Reporting

1

Justice Resource Center/Mock Trail/Moot Court

21

Law Enforcement Programs

2

Paralegal

1

Pre-Engineering

Architecture/Drafting

2

 

Civil Engineering

1

 Career Area

Program

Number of Programs

Computer Aided Drafting (CAD)

2

Pre-Engineering

2

Project Lead the Way (PLTW)

8

Urban Planning

2

Teaching

Pre-Teaching

Teach For Tomorrow

5

Technology

A+ Computer Repair

11

CISCO Academy Programs:

CISCO Networking Academy

23

CISCO Web Academy

8

Computer Applications

Computer Programming

1

C-TECH: Cabling/Networking

4

Desktop Publishing

6

E-Commerce/New Media

See Business (pg. 10)

Media/Web Design

See CISCO Web (above)

Microsoft Systems Computer Engineer (MSCE)

1

Microsoft Systems Engineer (MSE)

1

ORACLE Academy

2

Robotics:

FIRST Robotics

24

Lego League

6

World-wide Web Master (WOW)

1

Transportation

Aircraft Maintenance Technology

2

Air Frame Power Plant Maintenance (FAA)

1

Auto Body Repair (NATEF)

3

Automotive Technology (NATEF)

4

Aviation Ground Control

1

Transit Technology

1

 

 

Schools by Region

Virtual Enterprise (VE)/Academy of Finance (AOF)/Academy of Travel and Tourism (AOTT)/Academy of Information Technology (AOIT) & CISCO Programs

Region

Name of School

 

Borough

 

VE

 

AOF

 

AOTT

 

AOIT

 

CISCO

 

 

 

1

Bronx High School of Science

BX

x

1

DeWitt Clinton

BX

x

1

Grace Dodge

BX

x

X

x

1

John F. Kennedy

BX

2

1

Walton

BX

2

1

William H. Taft

BX

x

2

Adlai Stevenson

BX

x

X

x

2

Columbus

BX

x

2

Evander Childs

BX

x

x

x

2

Herbert H. Lehman

BX

x

2

Jane Addams

BX

3

x

2

Morris

BX

x

2

Wings Academy

BX

2

3

Business & Computer Applications

Q

x

3

Flushing

Q

2

3

Hillcrest

Q

x

x

3

Jamaica

Q

x

3

Martin Van Buren

Q

x

3

Springfield Gardens

Q

x

3

Thomas A. Edison HS

Q

x

Region

Name of School

 

Borough

 

VE

 

AOF

 

AOTT

 

AOIT

 

CISCO

3

Forest Hills HS

x

4

Bushwick HS

BK

x

4

HS for Arts and Business

BK

x

4

Grover Cleveland

Q

x

4

Queens Vocational

Q

x

5

Beach Channel

Q

x

X

x

5

East  New York Family Academy

BK

x

5

Far Rockaway

Q

x

5

Franklin K Lane

Q

x

5

Richmond Hill

Q

x

x

5

Thomas Jefferson

Q

x

6

Canarsie

BK

x

x

6

Clara Barton

BK

x

6

Erasmus Hall Campus HS – Bus & Tech

BK

x

6

Leon M. Goldstein

BK

x

6

Madison

BK

x

6

Paul Robeson

BK

x

X

x

x

6

Sheepshead Bay

BK

x

6

South Shore

BK

x

7

Edward R. Murrow

BK

x

x

7

Fort Hamilton

BK

x

X

7

John Dewey

BK

X

x

x

7

New Dorp

SI

x

Region

Name of School

 

Borough

 

VE

 

AOF

 

AOTT

 

AOIT

 

CISCO

7

New Utrecht

BK

x

x

x

7

Port Richmond

SI

2

x

7

Ralph McKee HS

SI

x

7

Staten Island Technical HS

SI

x

7

Susan Wagner (planning)

SI

X

x

7

Tottenville

SI

x

X

7

William E. Grady Technical HS

BK

x

7

Curtis HS

SI

x

8

Automotive

BK

x

8

Brooklyn Technical HS

BK

x

8

Harry Van Arsdale

BK

2

x

8

George Westinghouse

BK

x

x

8

Acorn Community HS

BK

x

9

Chelsea HS

M

x

9

HS of Enterprise, Business &

Technology

BK

x

x

9

HS of Economics & Finance

M

x

X

9

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

M

2

x

9

Leadership & Public Service

M

x

9

Manhattan Village Acad.

M

x

9

Manhattan Comprehensive     

M

x

9

Murray Bergtraum

M

x

x

x

9

Norman Thomas

M

2

x

9

Park West HS

M

x

Region

Name of School

 

Borough

 

VE

 

AOF

 

AOTT

 

AOIT

 

CISCO

9

Samuel Gompers HS

Bx

x

9

Stuyvesant HS

M

x

9

Washington Irving (planning)

M

x

x

10

A. Philip Randolph Campus HS

x

10

Brandeis

M

X

x

10

Beacon School

M

x

10

Bread and Roses Integrated Arts HS

M

x

10

Frederick Douglass Academy HS

M

x

10

HS of Int’l Bus & Finance

M

x

X

10

Martin L. King

M

X

ALT

Bronx Regional

BX

x

ALT

Concord High School

SI

x

ALT

Independence HS

M

x

ALT

Local Metropolitan Corp. Academy      

BK

x

ALT

Lower Eastside Prep.

M

x

ALT

Mid Manhattan Adult Learning Center

M

x

x

ALT

School of Co-op Technical Education

M

x

x

                   

 


 

7.         Career & Technical Education (CTE) Approved Programs - School Year 2004-2005

 

High Schools

Approved Programs

Alfred E. Smith High School (CTE)

Construction Technology – Electrical*

Construction Technology – Plumbing*

Construction Technology – Carpentry*

Automotive Technology

Automotive High School (CTE)

Automotive Technology

Aviation High School (CTE)

Aviation Maintenance Technology

Canarsie  High School

Nurse Assistant*

Chelsea High School (CTE)

Business/Information Technology

Clara Barton High School

Nurse Assistant*

Practical Nursing*

Curtis High School

Nurse Assistant*

Practical Nursing*

DeWitt Clinton High School

Nurse Assistant*

East NY HS of Transit Technology (CTE)

Industrial Electrician/Electrical Installation

Far Rockaway High School

Nurse Assistant*

Franklin K. Lane High School

Vision Technology*

George Westinghouse High School (CTE)

A+ Computer Repair and Maintenance

Vision Technology*

Grace Dodge High School (CTE)

Academy of Finance

Nurse Assistant*

Harry Van Arsdale  High School (CTE)

Construction Technology - Carpentry*

C-Tech Cable Technology

High School of Fashion Industries (CTE)

Graphics & Illustrations

High School of Graphic Communication Arts (CTE)

Commercial Art Production

Commercial Photography*

Lafayette High School

Nurse Assistant*

Long Island City High School

Culinary Arts*

Jane Addams High School (CTE)

Academy of Travel & Tourism

Nurse Assistant*

Park West High School

Culinary Arts*

Queens Vocational High School (CTE)

Plumbing*

Ralph McKee High School (CTE)

Construction Technology – Carpentry*

Cisco Networking Academy

Samuel Gompers High School (CTE)

Electronics Technician w/ A+ Certification

Talent Unlimited High School

Drama*

High Schools

Approved Programs

Thomas Edison High School (CTE)

Cisco Networking Academy

A+ Computer Repair

Microsoft Office User Specialist

Tottenville High School

Culinary Arts*

William E. Grady High School (CTE)

HVAC*

Construction Technology*

William Maxwell High School (CTE)

Cosmetology

Vision Technology*

* Approved Fall 2004                                 

 

8.   CTE Programs Pending Approval

 

School Name

Submission

SED Status

ACORN Community

New Media

Pending

Alfred E. Smith

HVAC

Pending

Art & Design

Architecture

Pending

Automotive

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

Brooklyn HS of the Arts – Preservation Arts

Preservation Arts

Pending

Brooklyn Technical

Pre-Engineering/Project Lead the Way

Pending

Canarsie

Pre-Engineering/Project Lead the Way

Pending

Curtis

New Media

Pending

Edward R. Murrow

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

Erasmus Business & Technology

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

Fashion Industries 

Visual Merchandizing

Pending

Forest Hills

Entrepreneurship

Pending

Fort Hamilton

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

George Westinghouse

Pre-Engineering/Project Lead the Way

Pending

Grace Dodge

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

Harry Van Arsdale

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

Herbert Lehman

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

Hillcrest

Practical Nursing

Pending

James Madison

Entrepreneurship

Pending

John Dewey

New Media

Pending

School Name

Submission

SED Status

Lafayette

Entrepreneurship

Pending

Murry Bergtraum

Accounting

Pending

New Dorp

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

New Utrecht

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

Newtown

New Media

Pending

Newtown

Pre-Engineering

Pending

Norman Thomas

Accounting

Pending

Paul Robeson

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

Paul Robeson

New Media

Pending

Port Richmond

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

Queens Vocational

New Media

Pending

Ralph McKee

Pre-Engineering/Project Lead the Way

Pending

Science Skills

Pre-Engineering/Project Lead the Way

Seward Park

Vision Technology

Pending

Sheepshead Bay

Nurse Assistant

Pending

Staten Island Tech

Pre-Engineering

Pending

Susan Wagner

Entrepreneurship

Pending

Thomas Jefferson

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

Transit Tech

   Transit Technician

Pending

Walton

Entrepreneurship/Virtual Enterprise

Pending

William E. Grady

Pre-Engineering/Project Lead the Way

Pending

William Maxwell

New Media

Pending