CTE

Career & Technical Education

Overview for First-time Perkins Applicants

The Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006 (Perkins IV) provides basic grants to improve the quality of career and technical education (CTE). New York continues to lead in programming that integrates academics in CTE programs to raise the achievement of students.

While much in the new Perkins legislation continues themes from prior iterations, the transition to Perkins IV brings important changes. The new law emphasizes:

  1. the creation of “programs of study;” in New York programs of study are defined as those programs meeting the requirements of the Regents 2001 Policy on Career and Technical Education;
  2. priority to high-skill, high wage, high demand training opportunities; and
  3. more detailed accountability: Title I Basic Grants (non-competitive) and Title II Grants (competitive) will track additional data elements.
  4. activities directed to the needs of special populations are now a mandated activity

Applications for Perkins IV funds must describe how grant monies support the development of programs that:

  1. integrate rigorous academics with career and technical instruction;
  2. link secondary education and postsecondary education for CTE students to prepare for high-skill, high-wage, high-demand occupations in current or emerging occupations; and
  3. enable participating students to meet or exceed performance standards emphasized by Perkins IV.

New York’s Career Development and Occupational Studies (CDOS) learning standards should be the foundation of all Perkins programming. Applicants should clearly show how these standards, (Career Development, Integrated Learning, Universal Foundation Skills and Career Majors) are embedded in program delivery strategies. The CDOS Learning Standards promote instructional strategies that address individual learning styles and provide experiential activities to increase student understanding of academic concepts. Students engaged in experiential learning gain a better understanding of academic concepts and the connections that link school, career options and their own personal development.

Perkins recipients are strongly encouraged to plan their efforts in concert with their Local Workforce Investment Board (LWIB) and Youth Council with emphasis on creating a continuum of services between Perkins and Workforce Investment Act (WIA) programs


Eligible Secondary CTE Programs

Perkins funds are allocated by a statutory formula that is based upon the number of individuals ages five to seventeen in a school district with greater weighting to those individuals who are below the poverty line (source is 2009 Census data). Districts and consortia seeking to access Perkins IV funds directly must meet the requirements of size, scope, and quality that include:

  1. allocations equal to or above $15,000
  2. programs in three of the 16 national career clusters
  3. enrollment that consists of
    1. at least 20 percent of the general population in CTE, or
    2.  at least 20 percent special populations in CTE (Perkins special populations: students with disabilities, students from economically disadvantaged families including foster children, non-traditional students; single parents; displaced homemakers; and English language learners.);or
    3. at least 40 percent special population members in the general population; and
    4. offer at least one New York State Approved CTE Program or plan for its development. Perkins grantees are expected to develop two more Approved Programs during the first program year to be submitted with their second application for funds.
  1.  In New York, programs of study will be defined as programs that are approvable through the Regents 2001 Policy on Career and Technical Education. Components of approved programs are:
  2. coherent and rigorous content, aligned with challenging academic standards, and relevant career and technical content in a coordinated, non-duplicative progression of courses that align secondary education with postsecondary education to adequately prepare students to succeed in postsecondary education. In New York, this may include quality integrated English language arts, mathematics, science, economics, and government and technical instruction;
  3. faculty with state certification in appropriate academic and/or technical fields;
  4. technical assessments that certify students meet current industry standards;
  5. articulation agreements that may include the opportunity for secondary education students to participate in dual or concurrent enrollment programs or other ways to acquire postsecondary education credits;
  6. available work-based learning experiences for students; and
  7. a data reporting infrastructure that will allow recipients to report student performance in order to evaluate their success on Regents examinations or alternatives approved by the State Assessment Panel, technical assessments and placement in higher education, employment or military.

Each program must develop a template, or use the career plan template as the basis for individualized graduation/career plans.

Size and scope will be determined for each agency based on the most current data available If an agency has not met size and scope but wishes to apply for funds, a detailed explanation must be provided in the Local Plan Narrative I in the application. This narrative must describe how funds will be directed to enable the agency’s programs to meet size and scope criteria.

Secondary agencies with an allocation of less than $15,000 or agencies not wishing to apply directly may partner with BOCES and/or school district(s). One of the partners must serve as the lead agency/applicant for the consortium and be responsible for the legal requirements, program evaluations, local advisory council, and fiscal duties and requirements of the entire consortium. School districts in rural and sparsely populated areas may qualify for a waiver to the $15,000 threshold. See Sections 131 (c)(2)(A)(i),(B) and 132(a)(4) of the Perkins legislation (found at http://www.ed.gov/policy/sectech/leg/perkins/index.htmlexternal web site


Which Districts Can Apply for Funds Without Forming a Consortium?

The following questions will help first-time applicants determine if their programs meet size, scope, and quality requirements.

For districts with allocations of $15K or above

  1. Does your school district offer 3 of the 16 national career clusters?

Yes:     Proceed to question 2

No:      Proceed to question 3

  1. Do your CTE programs enroll at least 20% of the overall 9-12 student population?

Yes:     Your district is able to apply for funds

No:      Proceed to question 4

  1. Are you able to build programs so that 3 clusters will be offered by June, 2013?

Yes:     Go back to question 2

No:      See “Which Districts Can Form a Consortium to Access Perkins Funds” decision tool below

  1. Are you able to build CTE programs to meet the 20% threshold by June, 2013?

Yes:     Your district is able to apply for the funds

No:      Go to question 5

  1. Does your CTE program enroll at least 20% special populations?

Yes:     Your district is able to apply for funds

No:      Proceed to question 6

  1. Does your school district enroll at least 40% special populations?

Yes:     Your district is able to apply for funds

No:      See “Which districts can form a consortium to access Perkins funds questions on the below

 

Perkins defines special populations as: (a) individuals with disabilities, (b) individuals from economically disadvantaged families, including foster children; (c) individuals preparing for non-traditional fields for their gender, (d) single parents including single, pregnant women; (e) displaced homemakers; and (f) individuals with limited English proficiency.

 


II. Which Districts Can Form a Consortium to Access Perkins Funds

For schools with allocations below $15K

  1. Does your consortium have a combined allocation of $15K or above?

Yes: proceed to question 2

No: You are not eligible to apply without your BOCES

  1. Does your consortium offer 3 of the 16 national career clusters?

Yes:     Proceed to question 3

No:      Proceed to question 4

  1. Do your CTE programs enroll at least 20% of the overall 9-12 student population?

Yes:     Your consortium is able to apply for funds

No:      Proceed to question 5

  1. Are you able to build programs so that 3 clusters will be offered by June, 2013?

Yes:     Go back to question 3

No:      You are not eligible to apply without your BOCES

 

  1. Are you able to build CTE programs to meet the 20% threshold by June, 2013?

Yes:     Your consortium is able to apply for the funds

No:      Go to question 6

  1. Do your CTE programs enroll at least 20% special populations?

Yes:     Your consortium is able to apply for funds

No:      Proceed to question 7

  1. Does your consortium enroll at least 40% special populations?

Yes:     Your consortium is able to apply for funds

No:      You are not eligible to apply without your BOCES

 

New York’s CTE Subject Areas

 

*National Career  Clusters

Agriculture

Business & Marketing

Family & Consumer Sciences

Health Occupations

Technology

Trade

Technical

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

Architecture & Construction

Arts, Audio/Video Technology & Communications

Business, Management & Administration

Education & Training

Finance

Government & Public Administration

 

Health Science

Hospitality & Tourism

Human Services

Information Technology

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security

Manufacturing

Marketing, Sales & Service

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

  CDOS Standard 1, Career Development: students will be knowledgeable about the world of work, explore career options and relate personal skills, aptitudes, and abilities to future career decisions; Standard 2, Integrated Learning: students will demonstrate how academic knowledge and skills are applied in the workplace and other settings; Standard 3a, Universal foundation Skills: students will demonstrate mastery of the foundation skills and competencies essential for success in the workplace; and Standard 3b, Career Majors: students who choose a career major will acquire the career-specific technical knowledge/skills necessary to progress toward gainful employment, career advancement and success in post-secondary programs.

Last Updated: March 12, 2014