THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK / ALBANY, NY 12234


Office of Facilities Planning

Tel. (519)474-3906 Fax (518) 486-5918

E-mail: www.emsc.nysed.gov.facplan/

July 2004

TO: District Superintendents
Superintendents of Schools

FROM: Carl T. Thurnau, PE, Coordinator

SUBJECT: STATE BUILDING AID FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICTS AND BOCES

The attached bulletin provides guidelines and information on school construction, pursuant to Section 3602 of the Education Law.

The Office of Facilities Planning assigns a Project Manager to every project that a school district or BOCES proposes to do. For many years the method for determining the extent of eligibility for building aid of any project involving a new instructional facility or an addition to an existing instructional facility involved the calculation of State-rated capacity. However, the public sector seemed to consistently misinterpret this label as meaning the number of students that could be placed in a particular classroom. This calculated number actually represented one part of the equation used to determine the maximum expenditures for contracts and for incidentals upon which Building Aid would be computed. In reality, it had little or nothing to do with the actual number of students served in each instructional space within the building. To help clarify the misinterpretation, the Office of Facilities Planning decided to change that terminology from State-rated capacity to Building Aid Units.

The attached represents the minimum class sizes required for new instructional facilities and the number of Building Aid Units represented by those classrooms. If you have difficulty interpreting any of the material, please feel free to contact a Project Manager in this office. In addition, we strongly urge you to contact our office as early as possible in the planning process and whenever there is a question concerning building construction or eligibility of certain work for Building Aid. It is our desire to assist school districts with the planning of facilities to house their educational programs as efficiently as possible, while at the same time maximizing their Building Aid.

There is additional information which describes the types of work that are or are not eligible for building aid. There is also information on the appropriateness of change orders and their eligibility for building aid and relationship to the original project.

Attachment

STATE BUILDING AID
FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICTS AND BOCES


BUILDING AID

Building Aid is available for certain approved capital outlays and debt service for school buildings housing elementary and/or secondary students and for school bus garages. A project is not eligible unless the construction costs of the project equal or exceed $10,000, excluding incidental costs. Consistent with Section 3602, subdivision 6, of the Education Law, such construction may include new buildings, additions, and alterations/reconstruction of facilities.

The Commissioner of Education must approve plans and specifications for capital construction projects undertaken by public school districts and BOCES. This charge is administered by the Office of Facilities Planning, pursuant to Section 408 of the Education Law and Part 155.2 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education. Proper procedures for obtaining approval of plans and specifications are outlined in other office publications.

It is important to note that approval of plans and specifications for most capital construction projects undertaken by a public school district or a BOCES is necessary whether or not Building Aid is involved. Staff are available to answer any questions pertaining to Building Aid or plan approval.

Eligibility for new construction is determined through an assessment of information contained in the school district's Facilities Needs Assessment Summary, enrollment projections, Instructional Space Review form, 5-YEAR capital Facilities Plan, and proposed floor plans, as well as the required curriculum and the specific educational programs offered by the district or BOCES. A Project Manager from our office will be assigned who can assist a district during the development phase of a project to maximize Building Aid.

Section 1 of Part F of Chapter 383 of the Laws of 2001 change the methodology used in the payment of Building Aid. Projects are considered Prospective Projects when they are approved by the Commissioner on or after December 1, 2001 or when the first borrowing for the project is after this date. Such projects are subject to an Assumed Amortization using the approved project costs. Approved project costs are the lesser of the actual costs or the maximum cost allowance (discussed below) for each of the four project cost categories. The categories are new/addition construction costs; alteration/reconstruction costs; new/addition incidental costs and alteration/reconstruction incidental costs. These costs are totaled to arrive at the Approved Project cost.

Building Aid is based on an Assumed Amortization Schedule using:
A statewide average interest rate. There is a separate interest rate for each of the Big Five Cities and the actual interest rate will be used for projects financed through the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York.

Terms are 15, 20 or 30 years for reconstruction, additions and new buildings respectively.
The first assumed principal and interest payment is made the latter of 18 months after approval of the project by the Office of Facilities Planning or the date that a general construction contract award is certified to the Education Department on the SA-139 Request for Building Project Data.

For the purpose of computing State Building Aid, debt service payments are assumed to be made every six months and the payments are assumed to be level debt service (equal payments).

Twelve months of capitalized interest that accrues before the first assumed payment is an aidable expense and is added into the principal amount to be financed.

State Building Aid will be based on the amount of Assumed Debt Service that occurs in a given school fiscal year.

State Building Aid will continue to be paid out based on the payment schedule in Education Law section 3609-a.

School Districts may finance their projects in any manner they choose and the former early borrowing penalty is eliminated for projects subject to prospective assumed amortization.
School Districts may align their new debt service to the assumed amortization rules, but are not required to do so.

The assumed amortization process for projects subject to prospective assumed amortization will allow the State Education Department (SED) to quickly calculate building aid for each project as soon as the project is approved. SED can more accurately estimate building aid for future years and there is less paperwork for the districts.

Part F of Chapter 383 of the Laws of 2001 also changed the aid methodology for existing projects.

Existing projects subject to retroactive assumed amortization are projects approved prior to December 1, 2001 by the Office of Facilities Planning and for which debt (Bonds, Bond Anticipation Notes or Capital Notes) were first issued prior to this date.
The assumed amortization methodology for existing projects subject to retroactive assumed amortization applies to Building Aid Payments beginning in the 2002-03 school year.

The assumed amortization methodology is applied to the existing debt and building aid is stretched out over the same period as if the district had financed for the blended maximum useful life of the projects associated with the debt, as determined by the Commissioner, less the number of years the project has already been financed
.

Building Aid is based on an Assumed Amortization Schedule for debt service using:

A statewide average interest rate for the 2001-02 school fiscal year. (There will be a separate interest rate for each of the Big Five Cities and the Actual interest rate will be used for projects financed through the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York.)

The remaining useful life of the projects
.

Reasonable approved refinancing fees and charges and additional principal necessary to advance refund bonds.
The outstanding principal for each project as of July 1, 2002.
Any other approved project costs that are to be funded through the issuance of debt
The first assumed principal and interest payment is assumed to be made by the school district on July 1, 2002
.
For the purpose of computing state Building Aid, debt service payments are assumed to be made every six months and the payments are assumed to be level debt service (equal payments).
State Building Aid will be based on the amount of assumed debt service that occurs in a given school year
.
State Building aid will continue to be paid out based on the payment schedule in Education Law, section 3609-a.
If you are interested in obtaining further detailed information regarding the above changes to the payment of Building Aid visit the State Aid web site at www.stateaid.nysed.gov.

In the case of instructional facilities (i.e., school buildings), the Maximum Cost Allowance is limited to:

· the Building Aid Units (BAU) assigned to the project by grade level or category and for new or existing space;
· multiplied by the Construction Cost Index that is in effect the month the general construction contract is signed;
· then that amount multiplied by the applicable Regional Cost Factor for the fiscal year that the project’s contracts are signed. This is applicable only to contracts signed after July 1, 1998.

The above formula may result in up to four amounts of maximum cost allowance derived both for contracts and for incidental costs, and for new and existing space. These amounts or the actual costs incurred, whichever is less, are then multiplied by the district’s Building Aid Ratio at the time the project is approved. The district’s Building Aid will be the result of this calculation.

NOTE: If the district is eligible for an additional adjustment to their Building Aid Ratio, then the Office of State Aid would factor this into the calculation when computing the actual Building Aid Ratio to be used.

In the case of bus garages, expenses eligible for Building Aid are limited to those necessary to maintain and store district-owned school buses. These expenses are used as the maximum cost allowance for these facilities. Facilities used for storing or maintaining other vehicles, such as cars for driver training instruction, grounds maintenance equipment and other types of vehicles not used to transport pupils are not eligible for Building Aid.

PURPOSE OF BUILDING AID

The purpose of Building Aid, indeed a major goal of Facilities Planning, is to ensure that each school district and BOCES provides suitable and adequate facilities to accommodate the students and programs of the district. To this end, new facilities -- new buildings, additions, major alterations -- must meet specific standards pertaining to the type, size and number of teaching stations, as well as building code requirements. Existing facilities must meet health and safety regulations, and reconstruction of existing facilities must meet building code requirements.

ELIGIBILITY FOR BUILDING AID

The Project Manager will assist a district in maximizing eligibility for Building Aid. This assessment involves a comparison of district wide pupil enrollment projections with the efficient operating capacity of existing school buildings to determine building needs. The vehicle for accomplishing this is a room schedule of minimum spaces necessary to house a district's educational program for a given number of pupils. In the case of an addition, the format of the room schedule allows for the listing of existing spaces and how they will be used prospectively. Thus, the difference between needed spaces and existing spaces will indicate the needed scope of work. The various formulas necessary to develop such a room schedule are included in this publication.

MINIMUM ROOM SIZES – required for new buildings and additions; recommended for new spaces created within existing space

General

a. Spaces in new buildings and additions which are required to house a district's educational program shall meet the size standards listed below. Where no square footage (sq. ft.) is listed, the size may be as determined locally.

b. In every case, listed square footage means minimum, net, clear, new educational space.

c. Newly-created spaces in alterations to existing school buildings should attempt to meet the size standards insofar as possible or practical.

d. Criteria to determine the number of spaces necessary is also included below. The number of pupil stations (i.e., Building Aid Units) assigned to various rooms is discussed later, beginning on page 14.

Elementary School

a. Classrooms --
1. Grades 1-6 770 sq. ft.
(27 BAU/room)
2. Pre-kindergarten/kindergarten 900 sq. ft.
(27 BAU/room)

b. Library 900 sq. ft.
(1 thru 12 classroom buildings -- none required)
(13 plus classroom building -- 1 required)

c. Physical Education - gymnasium 36' x 52'
(1 and 2 classroom buildings -- none required)
(2 thru 14 classroom building -- 1 required)
(1 thru 14 additional classrooms -- 1 additional)

d. Special Education


Student/Teacher Ratio

Maximum Pupil Capacity

Minimum Classroom Size

12:1 or 15:1 12 or 15 770 sq ft
12:1:1 12 770 sq ft
6:1:1 6 450 sq ft
8:1:1 8 550 sq ft
12:1+3:1 12 900 sq ft
Resource Room --- 300 sq ft


NOTE: Provide ancillary space equivalent to at least ¼ of the area of a special education classroom for each special education classroom being constructed, either as part of the new classroom or other designated space.

NOTE: Preschool: 50 sq. ft. per student or 60 sq. ft. for classroom serving non-ambulatory students (maximum of 12 students per room). Approval may be given for classrooms less than 50 sq. ft. per student if other areas of the building are allocated for preschool recreational or instructional use.

e. Usual ancillary spaces --
1. Administration
2. Adult Education
3. Auditorium or multi-purpose room
(number of fixed seats, or 36’ x 52’ usual, 7 sq. ft./person)
4. Art Room (usual) 770 sq. ft.
5. Cafeteria and Kitchen
(36’x52’ usual, 15 sq. ft./person)
(operating capacity of building divided by number of servings)
6. Computer Lab
7. Conference Room
8. Gifted and Talented
9. Grounds Maintenance
10. Health Suite
11. Music Room (usual) 770 sq. ft.
12. Music Practice room(s) -- small, individual
13. Remedial Rooms
14. Resource Rooms

15. Storage
16. Swimming Pool -- 25 meters x 7 ft. lanes
17. Teachers' room(s)
18. Toilets -- individual and/or gang


Secondary School

a. Agricultural shop 1500 sq. ft.
and classroom 400 sq. ft.
b. Art room, including storage 1200 sq. ft.
(1 room for each 400 7th and 8th grade pupils)
(1 room for each 500 9th-12th grade pupils)

c. Business and Computer Classrooms
1. Distributive Education 1000 sq. ft.
2. Office Practice/Secretarial Practice/Computer 840 sq. ft.
classrooms

d. Home and Careers (homemaking) (first room) 1200 sq. ft.
(1 room for each 500 pupils, other rooms per program)

e. Technology Classroom including 200 sq. ft. storage
(1 space for each 500 pupils) 2000 sq. ft.
Mechanical Drawing/CAD 840 sq. ft.

f. Vocational shops -- including storage . . . . varies with program

g. Library Reading Room
(10% of planned building enrollment in reading room at 25 sq. ft./person)
(See Study Hall, item "1", below)

h. Music (1 room for each 500 pupils including 1, 2 and 3, below)
1. Classroom 770 sq. ft.
2. Instrumental/Band (15 sq.ft./pupil) (usual minimum) 1400 sq. ft.
3. Vocal (7 sq. ft./pupil) (usual minimum) 1200 sq. ft.
4. Practice Rooms (1 for a piano)

i. Physical Education -- gymnasium – 48’x 66’
(up to 500 pupils) -- 1 required (501 to 1000 pupils) -- 1 additional
(each additional 500 pupils or fraction thereof -- 1 additional station --
36’x 52’minimum or a swimming pool, 25 meters x 7 ft lanes)

j. Recitation room/interchangeable classroom 770 sq. ft.
Number of classrooms equals (planned building enrollment ¸ 9)
+ 33 ¸ (number of teaching periods/day)

k. Science -- including preparation and storage

1. General Science 1000 sq. ft
Number of rooms = (100% of 7th and 8th grades ¸ 25) ¸
(number of teaching periods/day)
2. Earth Science 1000 sq. ft.
Number of rooms = (100% of 9th grade ¸ 25) ¸ (number of teaching periods/day)
3. Biology 1200 sq. ft.
Number of rooms = (70% of 10th grade ¸ 24) ¸ (number of teaching periods/day)
4. Chemistry 1200 sq. ft.
Number of rooms = (40% of 11th grade ¸ 24) ¸ (number of teaching periods/day)
5. Physics 1200 sq. ft.
Number of rooms = (35% of 12th grade ¸ 24) ¸ (number of teaching periods/day)

l. Study Hall -- up to 25% of pupil enrollment may be out of class at any given time. Accommodate these in library or study hall -- number of fixed seats.

m. Special Education

Student/Teacher Ratio

Maximum Pupil Capacity

Minimum Classroom Size

12:1 or 15:1 12 or 15 770 sq. ft.
12:1:1 12 770 sq. ft.
6:1:1 6 450 sq. ft.
8:1:1 8 550 sq. ft.
12:1+3:1 12 900 sq. ft.
Resource Room --- 300 sq. ft.


NOTE: Provide ancillary space equivalent to at least 1/4 of the area of a special education classroom for each special education classroom being constructed, either as part of the new classroom or other designated space.

n. Usual ancillary spaces
1. Administration
2. Adult education
3. Auditorium (no. of fixed seats, 7 sq. ft./person)
4. Cafeteria/Kitchen (15 sq. ft./person)
5. Conference Rooms
6. Computer Laboratory
7. Guidance Suite
8. Health Suite
9. Lockers and showers (for 100% of pupil enrollment)
10. Large group instruction (no. of fixed seats, 7 sq. ft./person)
11. Resource Rooms
12. Remedial Rooms
13. Storage
14. Maintenance
15. Teachers' room(s)
16. Toilets

DETERMINING BUILDING AID

In the actual determination of estimated building aid, the following terms apply:

· Pupil Capacity -- It is imperative that the definitions and differences in the following terms be understood.

1. Original Capacity – This represents the total number of students in the original building, or total complex in the case of additions, was designed to accommodate (i.e., 567 pupil elementary school; 1,000 pupil high school). Essentially, this number is the operational capacity of the building or complex when it was constructed and was the basis for the determination of minimum size of site.

2. Rated Capacity (State-Rated Capacity) -- Previously, this was understood to be the total number of students assigned by Facilities Planning to a building for the purpose of determining the maximum cost allowance for a capital construction project -- new building, addition(s), alterations, or, reconstruction -- pursuant to Education Law, Section 3602, subdivision 6. Facilities Planning now refers to this as Building Aid Units (BAU).

The BAU assigned to a particular project is computed using space standards established by the Commissioner. Note that a change in room use may result in a change in the BAU. When new buildings or additions to schools are planned, the total projected student enrollments for the grade levels to be housed in that new building are compared to the actual number of regular and/or interchangeable classrooms being proposed. (Note: Those enrollment projections are usually based on the Cohort Survival method and are a required component of the Facilities Needs Assessment Summary for that particular proposed project.)

3. Operating Capacity – This reflects the total number of students the building can reasonably and efficiently house based on the district's educational program and class size policy, and the number, size and current use of rooms as represented on approved plans. The operating capacity of a building is computed using the space standards established by the Commissioner modified by any differences due to the district's educational program and/or class size policy.

4. Enrollment (building enrollment) – This is the number of students actually assigned to a building during a specific school year.

· Construction Project Cost Index -- This is the New York State Labor Department index which represents the cost of labor and materials. It varies monthly (historically upwards) and is used to determine the construction project cost index for both construction contracts as well as for incidental costs. The construction project cost index accounts for the various factors included in the Education Law (K-6 = 1,000; grades 7-9 = 1,400; grades 7-12 = 1,500; a facility housing only special education students = 2,000; and special education students housed in a building with regular education students = 3,000) and is adjusted on the base year of 1950. For computing actual Building Aid, the construction project cost index used is the one that is in effect the month the district signs the major (or general construction) contract for the work proposed under each particular project. (Note: The construction project cost index for incidentals represents 25% of the cost index for contracts at the secondary grade levels and for special education, and 20% of the cost index for contracts at the elementary grade levels.

· Maximum Cost Allowance -- This represents the maximum amount of actual expenditures upon which the State will pay Building Aid. Pursuant to Section 3602, subdivision 6, a maximum cost allowance is determined for both construction costs and for incidental costs. The maximum cost allowance for incidentals is 25% of the maximum cost allowance for construction for secondary schools and special education, and 20% for elementary schools. In the case of a project having construction of a new addition, as well as reconstruction or alterations of an existing building, a separate maximum cost allowance is determined for the construction costs and for the incidental costs for both the addition and the reconstruction or alteration. When a proposed project includes an addition to an existing building as well as alterations (i.e., reconstruction) of the existing building, a separate maximum cost allowance is computed for the contract costs and for the incidental costs for both the addition and for the alterations portions of the project. (Allowable incidental costs are defined later on in this booklet.)

· District Aid Ratio -- This represents a fixed percentage determined annually for each individual school district, based on the full value of property in the district and the number of students in the district. It varies from 0% in the wealthiest districts to as high as 90% in the poorer districts. When reorganized incentive building aid is added to the aid calculated pursuant to the aid ratio of recently reorganized districts and the 10% incentive aid enacted effective July 1, 1998 is also added, the approved capital projects may be aided up to a maximum of 95% of approved expenditures.

10% inventive aid: If voters authorized capital project before July 1, 2000, the district gets select aid ratio plus 10%. If voter authorization is after July 1, 2000, the district gets the greater of the current aid ratio or the select aid ratio minus 10% and then adds 10% back to the selection.

FORMULA FOR BUILDING AID

Using the above terms, the formula for determining estimated building aid for a new building, addition, reconstruction and/or alteration is as follows:

1. The BAU are multiplied by the construction project cost index to determine a maximum cost allowance for both construction costs and incidental costs.

2. The maximum cost allowances are adjusted by multiplying each one (i.e., new versus existing BAU and contracts versus incidental cost indices) by the district’s applicable Regional Cost Factor. The Regional Cost Factor is used to compensate for higher construction costs in various geographical areas of the State. Note that if the Regional Cost Factor is greater than 1.0, it will increase the maximum cost allowances that are eligible for Building Aid.

3. The actual expenditures by category (i.e., new versus existing and contracts versus incidentals) are then multiplied by the district’s Building Aid Ratio on a project-by-project basis, taking into account any applicable incentive or RESCUE aid for the particular project and the results are the dollars that the district will receive if the actual expenditures for construction and incidentals are equal to, or less than the adjusted maximum cost allowances. If the actual expenditures in either category (contracts or incidentals) are less than the adjusted maximum cost allowance, the aid ratio is applied to the actual expenditure to determine what dollars the district will receive. If the actual expenditures exceed the adjusted maximum cost allowances, there is no penalty but the Building Aid Ratio will be applied only to the adjusted maximum cost allowances.

NOTE: Total expenditures for capital construction are limited to the amount properly authorized by either a vote of the people in a public school district (or declaration of an ordinary contingent expense by the Board of Education, when appropriate) or by the Boards of Education in the Big Five City School Districts.

BAU for Elementary Schools

The BAU for a new or an existing elementary school shall be determined by assigning 27 BAU to each 770 square foot classroom used for grades 1-6, and to each 900 square foot kindergarten or pre-kindergarten room. Where formal board policy or union contract limit the number of students in a classroom to less than 27 for Pre-K through 6th grade, we will use the lesser number when determining operating capacity to justify additional classrooms.

a. There is no provision in law for Building Aid on rooms housing any program below pre-kindergarten.

b. Pre-kindergarten rooms are those used for pre-kindergarten children as defined in Commissioner's Regulations, Section 151.2 (g).

Pre-kindergarten children generally mean children who will be four years of age on or before December 1st of the current school year, or who will otherwise be first eligible to enter into kindergarten in a public school commencing with the following school year.

The BAU for a new or existing open-planned classroom space elementary school shall be determined by dividing the open planned classroom space by 35 sq. ft. and then rounding off to the next lower multiple of 27 pupils.

In an existing elementary building, the BAU of a room over 550 square feet, but less than 770 square feet shall be determined by dividing the area of the room by 28.5 square feet/pupil and assigning the whole number. Existing rooms of less than 550 square feet are not included in BAU calculations.

Only classrooms and kindergarten/pre-kindergarten rooms are counted for BAU in an elementary school. It is assumed that the basic cost index generally will be sufficient to provide for both classrooms and ancillary spaces. A library, cafeteria, gymnasium, auditorium and teachers’ conference rooms will only increase the BAU for the project if these spaces are located in a new building or an addition to an existing school and only on an as needed basis.

BAU for New Elementary School/Addition

a.
Method for Computing BAU

1. Determine BAU according to space standards explained in the section above.

2. If the estimated budget for an addition exceeds the maximum cost allowances produced by the BAU using the criteria established above, you should then determine the BAU using the "Square Foot" Method explained on page 17. The BAU which is most advantageous for Building Aid will be used.

b. Special Cases: Elementary School Additions

If the estimated budget for the addition of an elementary school exceeds the estimated maximum cost allowance determined by using the above criteria, additional BAU may be added if the addition involves a new library, cafeteria, teacher's conference room, gymnasium or auditorium.

Additional BAU up to the maximums indicated below, shall be assigned on an as needed basis so that the estimated maximum cost allowance covers the estimated cost of the proposed new spaces or at least an increased portion of the estimated project costs for building those new spaces.

The additional BAU for Building Aid purposes shall not exceed the result of dividing the size of the specific area (up to the maximum size for aid purposes as indicated below) by 70 sq. ft./pupil.

· Elementary Auditorium
Maximum size - 4,200 sq. ft. (600 seats @ 7 sq. ft./seat)
Maximum BAU – 60

· Elementary Cafeteria
M
aximum size - 1,872 sq. ft.
Maximum BAU – 27
· Elementary Gymnasium
Minimum required size – 36 ft. x 52 ft.
Maximum BAU – 27

· Elementary Library
Maximum size - 1,900 sq. ft.
Maximum BAU – 27

· Elementary Teachers’ Conference Room
Maximum size - 770 sq. ft.
Maximum BAU – 11

BAU for Special Education

The BAU for special education classrooms shall be determined by assigning the BAU based on the disabilities of the students. Only classrooms are counted for BAU, not resource rooms or other ancillary spaces. It is assumed that the basic cost index will usually be sufficient to provide both the classrooms and resource rooms and/or any other ancillary spaces that may be needed to provide appropriate spaces for the special education students.



Student/Teacher Ratio

BAU Maximums

12:1 or 15:1 12 or 15
12:1:1 12
6:1:1 6
8:1:1 8
12:1 plus 3:1 12


BAU for Secondary School

General

a. A secondary school is a new or existing building housing any or all grades above sixth grade.

b. When a school houses both elementary and secondary pupils, the BAU is separately determined for the elementary versus the secondary spaces.

c. The BAU is based on seven instructional periods/day.

d. BAU of a secondary school is determined by either the Teaching Station Method or Pupil Station Method, dependent on the size of the school. The following are considered teaching stations:

1. Agricultural shop, including an agricultural classroom.
2. Art room (each).
3. Business education rooms (each).
4. Home and Careers (homemaking) (each, if 1000 sq. ft. or more).
5. Technology (industrial arts) shop (each).
6. Mechanical drawing room (each).
7. Music room (each, if 770 sq. ft. or more).
8. Physical education/gymnasium (each, if standard size).
9. Recitation classroom/interchangeable classroom (each).
10. Science - general, earth or advanced (i.e., biology, physics, chemistry).
11. Study hall (each, if 770 sq. ft., or more, and cafeteria/study hall, if so labeled and used).

    1. Swimming pool.

Teaching Station Method

The teaching station method will be applied to any:

    1. Junior High School having 29 or fewer teaching stations:

      Ascertain the total number of teaching stations used only for English, social studies, mathematics, languages, health education and general or earth science (not biology, chemistry or physics).

      Multiply this total by 30. The result is the BAU.

      b. Junior/Senior High School having 25 or fewer teaching stations:

      Ascertain the total number of teaching stations used only for English, social studies, mathematics, languages, health education and general or earth science (not biology, chemistry or physics).

      Multiply this total by 33. The result is the BAU.

c. Senior High School having 22 or fewer teaching stations:

Ascertain the total number of teaching stations used only for English, social studies, mathematics, languages, and health education.

Substitute this total for "X" in the formula: 8 (7X - 12). The result is the BAU.

Pupil Station Method

The Pupil Station Method will be applied to any:

a. Junior High School having 30 or more teaching stations.
b. Junior/Senior High School having 26 or more teaching stations.
c. Senior High School having 23 or more teaching stations.

To determine the total number of pupil stations (PS) in a building:

1. Divide the net area (square feet) of each of the rooms listed under "Pupil Stations" below by the listed square feet/pupil allowance to determine the PS in each room.
2. Record each result, not exceeding the listed maximums.
3. Total the above.
4. Subtract 200 from the total and divide the remainder by 1.16. The resulting number of PS is the BAU of the building for aid purposes.

Operating capacity
by this method is computed using the same method as outlined above, but modified by any differences due to the district's educational program and/or maximum class sizes which are clearly outlined in formal board policy and/or in teacher contracts.

Pupil Stations –

Room

Sq. Ft/

Pupil

Maximum number of

Pupil Stations (PS)

1. agricultural shop and classroom

75

20

2. art

45

25

3. business or computer rooms

    1. Distributive education
    2. Office/secretarial/typing/keyboarding
    3. Computer classroom

50

35

35

20

24

24

4. home and careers

50

24

5. technology (industrial arts)

75

24

6. mechanical drawing

35

25

7. library - reading room only

25

Not to exceed 15% of PS in number10

8. music

    1. classroom
    2. instrumental
    3. vocal

25

25

20

30

(area of room ¸ 25) x .4

(area of room ¸ 20) x .4

9. physical education

    1. gymnasium
    2. swimming pool

Per station

Per station

30

30

10. recitation classroom

    1. interchangeable classroom

b. open planned classroom

26

30

30

--

  1. science
    1. general, earth

b. advanced - biology, chemistry, physics

30

50

30

24

  1. study hall

a. cafeteria/study hall (if so labeled and used)

16.5

16.5

Not to exceed 40% of PS in number10 (area of room ¸ 16.5) x .7

Not to exceed 40% of PS in number10



BAU of a Secondary School Addition

a. Method for Computing BAU

1. Determine the BAU of the existing building, (i.e., no addition), considering prospective space usage by applying the appropriate "Teaching Station" or "Pupil Station" method explained above.
2. Determine the BAU of the total building complex, including the addition, again using the appropriate "Teaching Station" or "Pupil Station" method explained above.
3. Subtract the answers derived for number1 above from the answers derived for number2 above. The result is the BAU for the addition.
4. If the estimated budget of the project exceeds the maximum cost allowances based on the BAU from number3 above, determine the BAU using the "Square Foot Method" (see "c" below) and use that total BAU which is most advantageous for Building Aid purposes.

b. Special Cases: Secondary School Additions

If the estimated budget for the addition of a secondary school library, cafeteria, teachers’ conference room, gymnasium or auditorium exceeds the maximum cost allowance determined by using the above criteria, additional BAU for these spaces may be assigned.

Such additional BAU, up to the maximums indicated below, shall be assigned on an as needed basis so that the estimated maximum cost allowance covers the estimated cost of the listed spaces or at least an increased portion of the estimated project costs.

The additional BAU assigned for Building Aid purposes shall not exceed the result of dividing the size of the specific area up to the maximum size (for aid purposes) as indicated below by 100 sq. ft./pupil.

Secondary Auditorium
Maximum size - 7,000 sq. ft
Maximum BAU – 70

Secondary Cafeteria
Maximum size - 4,000 sq. ft.
Maximum BAU – 40

Secondary Gymnasium
Maximum size
a. 1,872 sq. ft. (for required minimum 36 ft. x 52 ft. gym)
Maximum BAU - 19
b. 3,168 sq. ft. (for required minimum 48 ft. x 66 ft. gym)
Maximum BAU – 32

Secondary Library
Maximum size - 3,750 sq. ft.
Maximum BAU – 37

Secondary Teachers’ Conference Room
Maximum size - 770 sq. ft.
Maximum BAU – 8

Square Foot Method

The Square Foot Method for computing BAU is a method which allows Building Aid up to a predetermined statewide average square foot allowance per pupil for different kinds of buildings. This method may result in more BAU for an addition than the Teaching Station or Pupil Station methods and may also have application when a proposed addition does not contain teaching stations which produce BAU. However, when an existing building plus the proposed addition already exceeds the statewide average square foot allowances, there is no Building Aid.

1. Determine the gross square foot area of the existing building. Divide the gross area by the appropriate square foot/pupil allowance listed below. The result represents the BAU assigned to the existing building.

Grades Housed

Square Foot/Pupil

K-6

85

K-9

100

7-9

100

K-12

100

7-12

125

10-12

125


NOTE: Space associated with special education is included in these numbers.

Determine the BAU of the total building complex (i.e., existing and proposed addition) based on prospective space usage and apply the appropriate Teaching Station method or Pupil Station method explained above.

Subtract the answer derived for number1 above from the answer derived for number2 above. The result is the BAU of the addition for the purpose of determining maximum cost allowances. Note that if the square foot/pupil allowance for the specific kind of building is exceeded, number1 will exceed number2 and the subtraction will result in a negative number which means that there are no BAU assigned to the project so there will be no Building Aid for the project.

EXPENSES ELIGIBLE FOR BUILDING AID

General

Section 408 of the Education Law stipulates that no school building can be erected, purchased, repaired, enlarged or remodeled until the plans and specifications for the work have been submitted to and approved by the Commissioner. Section 3602, subdivision 6, of the law states that Building Aid is available for approved expenditures for both construction or acquisition of new school buildings, and for the reconstruction and modernization or improvement of existing school buildings.

Definition of Terms

· New Construction -- New construction includes construction of new school buildings and additions to existing buildings.

· Acquisition -- Acquisition means the same as purchase.

· Repair -- Repair in Section 408 refers specifically to the requirement that plans and specifications for major repairs which affect the health and safety of occupants must be approved by the Commissioner. These types of repairs include occasional work needed to restore to a satisfactory condition that which has decayed, deteriorated, weathered or become broken, torn or otherwise inoperable, and which usually involve preserving the integrity of the building. Such repairs are considered projects that must have a Building Permit from our office. On the other hand, repairs that are recurring work items which must be done to promote the upkeep of a property and keep things in proper operating condition are considered to be minor repairs or maintenance work.

Note: Minor repairs and maintenance work are not eligible for Building Aid. If in doubt, the district should clarify whether or not the work needs a Building Permit by consulting with their Project Manager or the architects/engineers in our office.

· Alterations – There are two definitions for alterations:

Reconstruction work within the existing building which is part of a project to add new space onto the building (i.e., an addition project);

    1. Reconstructing the existing building to provide for a totally different use (such as changing an administrative building into a school or changing an elementary school to a secondary school);
      Note: For Building Aid purposes, alterations are treated the same as reconstruction work.

· Reconstruction -- Reconstruction includes replacement and/or remodeling in an existing school building. The term reconstruction is synonymous with the term capital improvement and means to rebuild, to renovate, to remodel, (i.e., to construct again). Essentially, reconstruction embodies all of the terms defined below and includes all types of capital construction work other than new buildings or additions.

Capital Improvement -- Capital improvement is defined in part by the Local Finance Law as any physical public betterment or improvement. An improvement means a valuable addition to an existing building, addition in this case meaning an enhancement rather than adding new space onto the building. An improvement is permanent and is intended to increase a building's value, beauty, or utility, or adapt the building for a new or further purpose. As such, an improvement must do more than merely replace or restore some part of the existing building to its original condition.

Remodeling -- Remodeling is defined as work performed to alter, modernize, renovate, or otherwise change a building in a different way.

Replacement -- Replacement refers to the replacement and/or installation of components of a building that will prolong the life and/or increase the value of the building. Examples --replacement of a such elements as roofs, windows, walls, or replacement of an element of the mechanical systems such as a boiler, temperature controls, water distribution, toilet fixtures, or electrical service.

Emergency Repairs/Recovery Work -- Key elements of the definition of a public emergency are that an emergency results from an unforeseen occurrence, and that it requires immediate corrective actions but only in the form of emergency repairs. Mitigation measures to correct an emergency are needed immediately and are temporary in nature. They are not capital construction in the usual sense, and do not require approval of the Commissioner.

Costs associated with the mitigation activities may be considered ordinary contingent expenses. Only the Board of Education has the authority to declare an expenditure to be an "ordinary contingent expense." If the Board does pass a resolution to declare an emergency and to fund the repairs as an ordinary contingent expense, then any costs incurred to stop further damage from occurring and to provide temporary repairs would be considered as an aidable incidental expense for any capital construction project that is needed to provide a permanent solution to keep the problem from recurring.

An emergency ends upon completion of the mitigation activities. Next comes the recovery period that may, and probably will, involve capital construction. Any capital construction associated with the recovery must be properly authorized, planned, developed, and approved just as any other capital construction project is advanced. As with any capital construction project affecting health and safety, approval of plans and specifications for the recovery project and issuance of a Building Permit by the Commissioner is required before advertising for bids and signing contracts. (Note: The Project Manager can help to obtain a quick approval for any project which results from a true emergency.)

· Construction Costs -- Certain costs for construction and/or reconstruction work approved pursuant to Section 408 of the Education Law, are eligible for Building Aid pursuant to Section 3602, subdivision 6. To be eligible for aid, construction contract costs must be equal to or exceed $10,000, and the various elements of the work must be legitimate capital construction items to be done in or on an instructional building or a bus garage, properly authorized and funded, and the project must have received prior approval and a Building Permit from the Commissioner prior to advertising for public bids.

· Incidental Costs -- In addition to aid for construction costs, certain expenditures for site purchase, grading or improvement of the site, original furnishings or equipment, or professional fees (design and legal) and other miscellaneous incidental costs (such as insurance during construction and general administrative costs) are also considered to be eligible for Building Aid.

Building Aid may also be available for accounting, tabulation, or computer equipment in the areas to be reconstructed for housing such equipment when requested in accordance with Section 155.2(b)(1)(vi) of the Commissioner's Regulations.

ELIGIBLE RECONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

·
Building Features Affected -- A reconstruction project must embody permanent improvements and replacements that increase the value or prolong the life of a building. Essentially, such improvements relate to various components of a building's structural envelope and various elements of the mechanical systems, rather than cosmetic features, or certain furnishings or equipment attached to (i.e., built into) the building.

The structural envelope of a building includes such things as roof, walls, windows, doors, insulation (including asbestos control) and fire/safety work, etc. Mechanical elements include plumbing (such as water distribution, sanitary drainage, fixtures); heating (such as boiler/burner, temperature control, ventilation); and electric (such as service, power/light distribution, lighting fixtures, communications).

· Scope of an Eligible Project -- To be eligible for Building Aid, reconstruction work must be done in the total building or a substantial portion of a circumscribed portion of the building. Substantial portion may include such divisions as the original building, a dated addition, a wing of the building, one total floor of a multi-story building or wing, or a program area (such as the auditorium/gymnasium complex) and, of course, the whole building.

In addition, reconstruction work must include the whole of a particular building component or element of a system, or a substantial portion thereof. For example, replacement of a whole roof would be eligible for aid. Likewise, replacement of a part of the roof which is bounded by parapets and/or roof edges would also be eligible for aid. Conversely, replacement of only a portion of the roof area that is bounded within the parapets and/or roof edges would not be eligible.

Replacement of one light fixture in each of three or four classrooms would not be eligible for aid; nor would replacement of all the fixtures in only one classroom. However, replacement of all light fixtures in all of the classrooms, or a substantial portion of the classrooms on a particular floor or wing, would be eligible for aid.

The same concept is applicable to item 3 like ceiling tiles. Replacement of a few tiles in each of three or four classrooms would not be eligible for aid; nor would the replacement of the whole ceiling in only one classroom. However, replacement of the ceiling in the whole building, or in a substantial portion of a floor or wing, would be eligible for aid.

The principle represented above applies equally to the remodeling or replacement of all building components and system elements. Any questions concerning what makes up a "substantial portion" should be discussed with the Project Manager.

·
Deteriorated Building Elements -- Over the course of time, certain items and elements of a school building which are attached to or built into the building reach a point where it can be documented that they no longer can be reasonably or properly maintained. They are represented by the following list:
- auditorium seating installations
- auditorium seating ( recovering)
- auditorium proscenium curtains
- bleacher installations (interior)
- cabinetry installations
- chalk/tackboard installations
- locker installations (gym type/corridor type)
- sun/light control (curtains, drapes, blinds)
- wall finishes (other than painter's finishes)

These listed kinds of work items are eligible for Building Aid if they meet the following criteria:

    1. The district must document in writing that the particular listed item(s) has extensively deteriorated and can no longer be reasonably or properly maintained;
      2. The listed work must be performed in a "substantial portion" of the building, as previously defined; and
      3. The listed work must be included in a bona fide and otherwise eligible reconstruction project, and be listed on the Scope of Proposed Project form for that project. A project that would consist of only the kind of work items listed above would not be eligible for Building Aid.

      Also, if these kinds of work items are not to be done within a "substantial portion" of the building, the work would not be eligible for Building Aid unless the district could document that such work is cost effective only if done in conjunction with similar work which is being performed in a "substantial portion" of the building.

      Painter's finishes in an existing building are not eligible for Building Aid except where the painter's finishes are necessary to complete the finishing of a building element or an area which has been reconstructed.

      · Ineligible Expenses in a Reconstruction Project -- Work or expenses which do not prolong the life of a building or add to its value are not eligible for building construction aid. Typically, this type of work is intended to simply keep a building in an operating condition and includes both maintenance and repair work.

      Maintenance -- As previously stated, maintenance is recurring work which is intended to promote the upkeep of a property and otherwise maintain the property in properly operating condition. Maintenance includes refinishing or resurfacing with painter's type finishes.

      Repairs -- Also, as previously stated, repairs are occasional work of a recurring nature which are intended to restore to a satisfactory condition that which has decayed, deteriorated, weathered or become broken, torn, or otherwise inoperable. As such, repairs will fix, mend, make good or replace a part(s), or put it together again, or cause it to operate satisfactorily. In a reconstruction project that is otherwise eligible for Building Aid, repair and maintenance portions are not eligible for Building Aid.

      Site Development -- Site development work that is accomplished in conjunction with a bona fide reconstruction project, as previously defined, is eligible for Building Aid as an incidental cost to the reconstruction project.

      Eligible site development includes development of new (i.e., original) plantings, turf areas, playground and athletic installations (including bleachers, walks, roads and parking areas). Site development also includes the replacement and/or reconstruction of such items that can no longer be reasonably and practically maintained.

      Site maintenance work such as reseeding or fertilizing turf areas, marking game lines, and patching or resurfacing blacktop or similar paving are not eligible for Building Aid. Construction of new storage buildings, public toilet and team locker facilities, or similar new ancillary buildings are not eligible for Building Aid unless done in conjunction with the construction of a new school, but would still require separate Building Permits.

Aid for Eligible Leased Space


Aid on instructional leased space; lease must be at least 10 years to receive aid on a capital project conducted in the leased space. Work up capacity (BAUs) as if a regular addition or new. Aid on construction costs will be pro-rated, based on 15 years; e.g., if district has a 5 year lease, they will get 5/15 of maximum cost allowance.

CHANGE ORDERS

Change orders reflect costs incurred as a result of changes to a project after the project has been approved by the Commissioner, publicly bid and awarded. Change orders can arise from many circumstances including unforeseen conditions during construction, design errors or omissions, or the owner requesting changes to the project after approval.

A change order is used to officially make changes in a signed contract for capital construction to add or delete certain portions of the work, or otherwise change a condition or the amount of the contract. A change order may be awarded to a contractor without competitive bidding, however, no important change may be made which so varies the original plan or is of such importance as to constitute a new undertaking (Opinion of State Comptroller number60-505). This means that a change order may NOT expand the scope of work, or represent a basic departure from work already included in the contract.

Based on the above statement, change orders should be limited to those items necessary to implement the project originally contemplated by the district, and approved by the voters and by the Commissioner. For example, in a project to replace the windows and window treatments, ceilings and heating systems in a classroom wing, it may be appropriate or necessary to replace the lighting fixtures as a change order, but it would not be appropriate to install a new building wide fire alarm system or install new carpet in the library under a change order. Neither of those two changes bear any relationship to the originally proposed construction project and if necessary, that work should be undertaken as separate construction projects properly authorized, approved, bid, and awarded.

The most common improper change order presented to the Office of Facilities Planning is one expending unencumbered funds. Most often this occurs near the end of a project and the proposed change order introduces types of work that were not included in the original plans and specifications. Change orders for such work will not be approved for building aid. Had a shopping list of desirable items been included in the original plans and specifications as add alternates, change orders to effect such alternates would be approved.

Following are some specifics about change orders:
The Commissioner must approve all change orders, even when they are applied to allowances and contingency funds.

Each signed change order must be submitted to Facilities Planning with a fully executed Change Order Certification form.

The President of the Board of Education, the architect/engineer, and the contractor shall sign each change order.

The SED Project Control Number and the name of the SED Project Manager must appear on each change order.

There must be sufficient detail and technical data to denote:

What work proposed for addition or deletion is being done; provide a detailed explanation of what is being done, including drawings that are supplied to the contractor.

Why it is being done; provide a detailed explanation of why the work is required.

The cost of the change order; and

The revised contract total.

All approved change orders are part of the official plans and specifications for the project and must be carefully filed with the approved documents. If there are any questions concerning change orders, particularly whether the intended work is appropriate for a change order, contact either the Project Manager or the Architect/Engineer in our office that reviewed and approved the initial project.  

Facilities Planning will approve all change orders that are compliant with the code, however, those that lack sufficient detail to be properly evaluated will be returned. Change orders that clearly depart from the original scope of the project, as well as those that exceed competitive bidding thresholds, may be approved for code compliance but disapproved for building aid. In certain circumstances or emergency situations a district may be able to justify the expense of a large change order. Contact your project manager as early as possible to begin this conversation to avoid having change orders disapproved for building aid.

The District must be able to justify that issuing a change order to an existing contract instead of initiating a new public bid for the proposed work is in the best interest of the district. It is the district’s responsibility to understand these requirements and abide by them in order to maximize the building aid associated with a project and perform capital upgrades in compliance with the Education law, General Municipal Law, and the Opinion’s of the State Comptroller.

A. ELIGIBLE ITEMS FOR BUILDING AID

I. Construction/Reconstruction

GENERAL CONSTRUCTION

Hazardous Materials
Removal/Containment/Mitigation of:
Mold and Mildew
Asbestos
Lead

Concrete
Cast-in-place Concrete
Cementitious Decks (gypsum, insulating concrete, wood fiber)
Precast Concrete

Masonry
Masonry Restoration (including repointing)
Unit Masonry (brick, block, structural tile)

Metals
Metal Decking (floor deck, roof deck)
Metal Joists
Structural Metal Framing (structural steel, framing systems)

Metal Fabrications (stairs, ladders, railings, gratings - must be a building element, NOT part of site development)

Wood and Plastics
Architectural Woodwork (built in wood cabinets and casework only)
Finish Carpentry (millwork, laminates, paneling)

Thermal and Moisture Protection
Built-up Bituminous Roofing
Elastomeric/Plastomeric
Sheet Roofing
Shingles & Roofing Tiles
Fireproofing (boards, sprayed)
Insulation (Building/Roof) (batts, blankets, boards, foamed-in-place, sprayed)
Preformed Roofing & Siding
Roof Specialties & Accessories (vents, curbs, hatches)
Sealants & Caulking
Skylights
Waterproofing/Dampproofing (membranes, fluid applied) (NEW construction only!)

Doors and Windows
Finish Hardware
Glazed Curtain Walls
Glazing (glass, tempered, wired, plastics)
Metal Doors and Frames
Metal Windows
Special Doors (sliding, folding, accordion, overhead, grilles)
Wood and Plastic Doors
Wood and Plastic Windows

Finishes
Acoustic Treatment (ceilings, walls, space units,insulation)
Carpeting
Gypsum Board
Lath and Plaster
Painting / Fire Resistant Paints (must be original furnishing directly related to a capital construction project)
Resilient Flooring
Terrazzo
Tile (ceramic, quarry, mosaic)
Wall Coverings (vinyl coated, fabric, wallpaper) (must be original frnishing directly related to a capital construction project)
Wood Flooring

Specialties
Compartments (Toilet) & Cubicles
Demountable Partitions
Lockers (built-in)
Operable Partitions (folding, accordion, sliding)
Toilet Accessories

Special Construction
Conveying Systems
Elevators / Wheelchair Lifts
Material Handling Systems
Pre-engineered Structures (modulars, portables, greenhouse attachments)
Solar Energy System apparatus (pumps, wiring, controls)
Swimming Pools

HEATING AND VENTILATING
Air Handling (air handling units, fans, ventilators)
Boilers (burners, accessories)
Building Systems Control (energy management computer system)
Control Systems (electric, electronic, pneumatic)
Fuel Fired Heaters (rooftop units)
Fuel Handling Systems (fuel oils system, tanks, etc.)
Furnaces
Heating Terminal Units (unitventilators, convectors, radiation)
Packaged Air Conditioners/ Heat Pumps
Refrigeration

PLUMBING
Drainage & Vent System
Fire Protection Systems (sprinklers, standpipes, foam & chemical extinguishing systems)
Gasoline (Diesel) Dispensing System
Plumbing piping
Plumbing Fixtures
Roof Drainage system
Water Supply (Domestic) System

ELECTRICAL
Alarm & Detection Systems (fire, smoke detection, intrusion)
Communication System (clock & program, intercommunication, public address, telephone)
Emergency Lighting
Lighting (fixture replacement only: not lamp and ballast retrofit)
Service & Distribution
Standby Power Generation System
Television System (CCTV system: not standalone TVs!)
Theatrical Lighting
Transformers

II. INCIDENTAL TO CONSTRUCTION

COMPUTERS, SOFTWARE AND COMPUTER AID POLICY

Summary:
Computer software: software to run network is aidable. Educational software is not aidable under building aid.
Computers: aidable if part of a bona fide NEW secondary computer classroom or new building.

Policy:
Computer hardware purchase and installation, including conduits, wiring and powering and testing of hardware installations, are currently eligible for Building Aid if the cost is less than $10,000 but the installation is part of a larger construction project whose cost does exceed $10,000. Such installations for which the cost is greater than $10,000 are also eligible if the specific installation is approved by the Commissioner.

Bill Section 500 of Chapter 170 of the Laws of 1994 applies the above policy guidelines to capital expenditures of less than $10,000 for acquisition of the described technology. Therefore, such expenditures may now be claimed for Building Aid even when total expenditures are less than $10,000.

Computer elements eligible for aid are:

- Incidental costs for computer equipment installed as original equipment in a new building or a new addition.

- Approved computer classrooms in new buildings/additions, or alterations to an existing classroom to create a new computer classroom.

- Incidental costs for original purchase and installation of hardware (including computer hardware)

- Conduit, wiring, and powering and testing of hardware installations.

- Building wide and campus wide local area network (LAN) systems wiring and in- building elements of other wide area networks (WAN):

- Original purchase and installation of conduit, wiring, and powering and testing of hardware installations network server and operating system software.

The following elements are ineligible for Building Aid:

- Individual computer workstation hardware not located in a computer classroom unless claimed as incidental costs as part of the original furnishings and equipment for a new building or addition.

- All cost for software purchase, including application software costs, and costs for installation of software (other than installation of basic operating systems software required for hardware testing).

- All cost associated with lease or purchase of wide area network hardware (leased lines, fiber optic cable, etc.) not located on district property.

- Up-grade of existing LAN or WAN equipment beyond that necessary to interface with new computer classroom installations.



FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT (Original purchase of furniture and equipment must be specific to construction of NEW space)
Athletic & Recreational Equipment (scoreboards, backstops, gym apparatus, exercise equipment)
Audio Visual Equipment (screens, projectors)
Auditorium Seating
Chalkboards/Tackboards
Commercial Laundry Equipment (washers, dryers)
Copiers (NEW school only)
Darkroom Equipment (transfer cabinets, processing equipment, doors
Fax machines (NEW school only)
Fire Extinguishers
Food Service Equipment (kitchen and serving): only aidable when kitchen and serving areas are new or newly reconstructed.
Flags and Flagpoles (NEW school only)
Furniture and Accessories (classrooms, science, library, lounge, cafeteria, office, etc.) (lamps, desk accessories, waste receptacles, etc.)
Globes maps and charts: are aidable but only in newly created instructional space.
Industrial & Process Equipment (kilns, spray booths)
Laboratory Equipment (apparatus, fume hoods)
Library Equipment (stacks, carrels)
Manufactured Casework (classroom, library, science, and laboratory, etc.)
Multiple Seating (folding/ stacking chairs, tablet-arm chairs)
Observatory Equipment
Planetarium Equipment
Plaques (to identify new building or addition only)
Residential Equipment (Home Ec. appliances)
Rugs and Mats (not carpet)
Security Latches
Telescoping Bleachers
Theatre and Stage Equipment (curtains, rigging)
Trash receptacle (new school only)
Window Treatment (blinds, shades, draperies, suncontrol)

NOTE: For a list of deteriorated building elements that are eligible for aid when propertly justified, see page 20 of this publication.


SUPERVISION OF CONSTRUCTION
Clerk of the Works
Watchman
Construction Manager

SERVICES (Costs related to capital construction only)
Administrative Costs
Appraisals
Architect’s Fees
Bank/Agent/Realtor’s Fees
Printing Costs
Sewer/Water Fees
Survey and Engineering Fees
Temporary Services/Heat

INSURANCE
Bond Insurance
Construction Insurance

LEGAL SERVICES (Only as related to capital construction project)
Bond Council
Litigation
Rights of Way
School Attorney

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS
Library/Media Center Collection
Reference Collection
Note: above items are aidable in NEW space only. New books in a new library built to replace an existing library are not aidable.

SITE WORK, UTILITY & SERVICE SYSTEMS (Must be related to $10,000 of interior capital construction in instructional building/bus garage ONLY)
Ancillary Buildings: Press Boxes are aidable at a NEW building only and is treated as ancillary space under incidental expenses (but will likely push those expenses above the maximum cost allowance)
Athletic Fields: Astroturf
Demolition (ONLY in conjunction with a construction project)
Excavating, Backfilling & Compacting
Grading - Rough/Finish
Landscaping (lawn, turf areas, trees, shrubs)
Paving (roadways, parking areas, walks, tracks, tennis courts): ONLY new site OR complete rehab down to base. Top coating is NOT aidable. Project must include new base, binder and top.
Public Water Service
Sanitary Sewer System – Municipal (only that portion on school property)
Septic System (On Site)
Site Acquisition
Site Improvements (irrigation, fences, guard rails, playgrounds, playfields, and equipment)
Site Lighting
Site Preparation (clearing, stripping)
Storm Drainage
Subsurface Exploration (borings)
Utility & Service Systems
Utility Electric Service
Utility Gas Service
Water Wells

B. ITEMS NOT ELIGIBLE FOR BUILDING AID

Administrative Buildings
Artwork (paintings, wall hangings,murals)
Audit fees (for Energy Performance Contracts)
Automobiles: Aligning, Balancing
Band uniforms
Boiler tubes are aidable ONLY if a major portion of the boiler is reconstructed and re-tubed.
Buses, Trucks
Cleaning Supplies
Coffee Service
Computers or Calculators for Clerk of the Works
Educational Software
Equipment: lawnmowers, tractors, snowblowers, vacuum cleaners, floor scrubbers, etc. (even with new construction, these items are never aidable).
Magazines
Music books
Musical instruments (under ANY circumstance)
Operations and Maintenance
Paper
Pinnies
Science Supplies
Refinishing, Resurfacing and Topcoating
Repairing
Storage Buildings
Supplies and Materials
Swim suits
Temporary Storm windows
Testing
Textbooks
Towels
Two-way radios and cellphones used during construction
Vans
Workbooks