Part B Annual Performance Report for 2007-08 - New York State
February 2009

Revised April 2009

Overview of the Annual Performance Report Development:

See Overview of the Development of the Annual Performance Report (APR) in the Introduction section, page 1.

Monitoring Priority: FAPE in the LRE

Indicator 1:  Percent of youth with individualized education programs (IEPs) graduating from high school with a regular diploma.

(20 U.S.C. 1416 (a)(3)(A))

Measurement:
Measurement for youth with IEPs should be the same measurement as for all youth.  Explain calculation.

New York State’s (NYS) Measurement:

Percent of “total cohort” of students with disabilities who graduate with a high school diploma (Regents or local diploma) as of June 30 after four years of first entering 9th grade or for ungraded students with disabilities, after four years of becoming 17 years of age. NYS will begin using the performance of the 2004 total cohort for accountability under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act.

NYS’ Calculation:

NYS has set its targets based on the performance of the “total cohort”. See below for the definition of the 2004 total district cohort.

The 2004 district total cohort consists of all students, regardless of their current grade level, who met one of the following conditions:

  • first entered grade 9 (anywhere) during the 2004-05 school year (July 1, 2004 through June 30, 2005); or
  • in the case of ungraded students with disabilities, reached their seventeenth birthday during the 2004–05 school year.  Ungraded students are included in the 2004 cohort if their birth date is between July 1, 1987 and June 30, 1988 (inclusive).

Students who have spent at least five months in district schools or out-of-district placements during year 1, 2, 3, or 4 of high school are included in the district total cohort unless they transferred to another diploma-granting program outside the district.  For the 2004 Total Cohort, Year 1, 2, 3, and 4 are the 2004-05, 2005-06, 2006-07, and 2007-08 school years, respectively.

A student will be included in the district total cohort if the student’s enrollment record in the district shows that the student was enrolled for:  

  • at least five continuous (not including July and August) months and the Reason for Ending Enrollment in the district was not one of the following: transferred to a school in another district, a nonpublic school, or a school outside New York; died; transferred by court order; or left the US.
  • less than five months and has an ending reason indicating that the student dropped out or transferred to an Alternative High School Education Preparation Program (AHSEPP) or High School Equivalency Preparation Program (HSEPP) program and the student’s previous enrollment record in that district (assuming one exists) indicates that the student:
  • was enrolled in the district for at least five months (not including July and August); and
  • dropped out or transferred to a AHSEPP or HSEPP program.

 

FFY

Measurable and Rigorous Target

FFY 2007
(2007-08 school year)
(2004 total cohort)

The percent of youth with IEPs graduating from high school with a regular high school diploma within four years, as of June, will be 38 percent.

 

Actual Target Data for FFY 2007:

The percent of youth with IEPs graduating from high school with a regular high school diploma within four years, as of June 2008, was 41.3 percent.

Total Cohort, As of June 30, Four Years Later

Cohort Year

All Students

Students with Disabilities

# in Cohort

Graduation Rate

(Number/Rate)*

# in Cohort

Graduation Number/Rate*

2000

199,312

67%

21,262

46%

2001 (new baseline data)

212,135

66%

26,281

38%

2002

210,910

67%

27,453

37%

2003

220,332

68.6%

28,528

39.3%

2004

223,953

70.4%

31,304

41.3%

* NYS is adding the number of graduates beginning with the 2004 total cohort.

Total Cohort Analysis of Students with Disabilities’ (SWD) Graduation Rates
for New York City, Large Four Cities Combined and Rest of School Districts

Need/ Resource Capacity Category

2001 Total Cohort of SWD

2002 Total Cohort of SWD

2003 Total Cohort of SWD

2004 Total Cohort of SWD

# in Cohort

Grad. Rate

# in Cohort

Grad. Rate

# in Cohort

Grad. Rate

# in Cohort

Grad. Rate

New York City

7,627

17.6%

7,587

18.6%

8,407

19.8%

10,112

22.6%

Large Four Cities

1,784

21.7%

1,862

20.5%

1,536

22.5%

1,612

26.3%

Urban/Suburban High Need Districts

2,487

30.4%

2,619

28.8%

2,778

31.7%

2,633

34.8%

Rural High Need Districts

2,165

32.5%

2,240

31.2%

2,323

35.9%

2,408

36.1%

Average Need Districts

8,733

48.1%

9,366

45.6%

9,563

49.0%

10,221

51.7%

Low Need Districts

3,459

74.0%

3,740

74.1%

3,873

72.4%

4,102

74.4%

Charter Schools

11

15.4%

39

15.9%

48

6.3%

127

37.0%

Total State

26,266

37.9%

27,453

37.5%

28,528

39.3%

31,304

41.3%

 

Total Cohort Analysis of Students with Disabilities (SWD) Graduation Rate by Need/Resource Capacity Category of School Districts

Group of School Districts

2001 Total Cohort of SWD

2002 Total Cohort of SWD

2003 Total Cohort of SWD

2004 Total Cohort of SWD

# in Cohort

Grad. Rate

# in Cohort

Grad. Rate

# in Cohort

Grad. Rate

# in Cohort

Grad. Rate

Big Five Cities

9,411

18.4%

9,449

19.0%

9,943

20.2%

11,724

22.9%

Rest of State

16,855

48.7%

18,004

44.7%

18,585

49.6%

19,580

52.2%

Total State

26,266

37.9%

27,453

37.5%

28,528

39.3%

31,304

41.3%

Discussion of Improvement Activities Completed and Explanation of Progress or Slippage that occurred for FFY 2007:

Explanation of Progress or Slippage

Improvement Activities Completed during 2007-081

The Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID) accessed technical assistance to further inform their activities to improve the graduation rates of students with disabilities.  This included a review of Information and resources, including but not limited to information available through the Federal Resource Center for Special Education (FRC), Academy for Educational Development, Northeast Regional Resource Center (NERRC), Learning Innovations at WestEd, National Center for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems (NCCRESt), and the Access Center:  Improving Outcomes for All Students K-8.  In addition, VESID staff participated in various State and national meetings, conferences and webinars.

The State Education Department (SED) worked with the New York Comprehensive Center, funded by the United States Education Department (USED), to develop the capacity of SED and its networks and agencies to assist districts and schools in improving achievement outcomes for all students - see http://nycomprehensivecenter.org/events/.

Activities Completed:

  1. NYS' criteria for identifying school districts as needing assistance or intervention under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) includes a measure of graduation rates for students with disabilities in relation to the State's graduation target for that school year.
  2. VESID substantially increased the amount of its IDEA discretionary funds available for Quality Improvement Implementation grant awards to school districts identified as needing assistance or intervention.  In January 2009, VESID provided approximately 65 school districts with grant awards to implement activities focused on improvement in instruction for students with disabilities and to address compliance issues identified through the focused review monitoring process.  Many of the activities were directed to improve graduation rates of students with disabilities.
  3. VESID's Quality Indicator Review and Resource Guides2 were further developed to guide the work of SETRC in school districts identified as needing assistance or intervention to improve the district’s instructional programs in the areas of literacy instruction, behavioral supports and interventions and/or special education instructional practices.
  4. Professional development to enhance the expertise of SETRC to inform their school improvement work was provided to the SETRC network during the VESID statewide meetings with a focus on:
  5. The focused monitoring review process was further refined to specifically focus on compliance issues most directly relating to graduation rates for students with disabilities.
  6. Seven new regional positions were created through VESID's federally funded State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG) to identify a cadre of “Effective Practices Schools” throughout NYS.  These regional staff will document the practices in successful schools to promote the sharing of identified practices with low performing school districts.
  7. The Board of Regents approved new regulations on integrated co-teaching (a special education teacher and general education teacher providing instruction together) to promote greater access and participation in regular classes for students with disabilities.
  8. NYS regulations were amended, effective July 2008, to provide autism specific requirements for special education teacher preparation programs; to establish standards under which SED will approve providers of this training; and to require that all teachers applying for certification in special education titles on or after September 2, 2009, complete course work or training in the needs of children with autism. NYS Education Law also requires that school administrators and supervisors assigned on or after September 2, 2009 to serve as special education administrators must complete training in the needs of children with autism as soon as practicable after their assignment, and certified school administrators/supervisors assigned to serve as special education administrators prior to September 2, 2009 are required to have enhanced training in the needs of children with autism by such date.
  9. Representatives from 72 NYS institutions of higher education (IHEs) met on a statewide and regional basis to discuss personnel preparation issues and research-based instructional practices to improve results for students with disabilities.  Seven summer symposia were sponsored by VESID funded Higher Education Support Center (HESC) on literacy instruction, behavioral supports and/or special education instructional practices.  With HESC funds supporting their work, IHEs worked directly with school districts to address low performance issues through improved instructional practices.  In addition, HESC formed three study groups with IHE representatives from across the State to align personnel preparation programs for special education teachers with the research-based instructional practices identified in VESID's Quality Indicator Review and Resource Guides.

Examples of Effect of VESID interventions:

Revisions, with Justification, to Proposed Targets / Improvement Activities / Timelines / Resources for FFY 2007:

Revision to Improvement Activities:

  1. VESID substantially increased the amount of its IDEA discretionary funds targeted for grant awards to school districts to implement systemic improvements to their instructional programs and behavioral supports for students with disabilities.  These awards will be available annually from 2009-14 to school districts identified in that year as needing assistance or intervention and those at risk of such determinations directed by VESID to receive technical assistance.
  2. Chapter 57 of the Laws of 2007 was enacted to enhance SED's accountability system for all students.  These laws require SED to develop an interim, modified accountability system for schools and districts that is based on a growth model; and to require certain school districts to enter into Contracts for Excellence and spend a portion of their Foundation Aid increase for school year 2007-08 on certain allowable programs and activities.  Each Contract for Excellence requires performance targets for students impacted, particularly for its neediest students including students with disabilities, to reduce the percentage of students in specific populations who are not proficient in the major subjects.  The contracts allow spending that is targeted at class size reduction, longer school day measures, improved teacher and principal quality, middle and high school restructuring, and full-day prekindergarten and kindergarten.  Fifteen percent of the spending can be targeted at research-based experimental programs.

1 See http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/spp/2007plan/graduation.htm for SPP improvement activities targeted for Indicator 1.

2 http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/techassist/QIcover.htm