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NYSED/School Library Services Summit


Navigation: Introduction | 2014 School Library Summit | Framework Plan & Action Steps | Progress Report | Summit Participants | Further Reading


INTRODUCTION

The New York Library Association (NYLA) and the Section of School Librarians (NYLA/SSL), in partnership with New York State Education Department (SED), mounted a two-day School Library Summit held in Albany, at the State Education Department, 89 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York, 12234, on Monday and Tuesday, July 7 and 8, 2014. Collectively, the SED, NYLA/SSL, NYLA, and the School Library Systems Association (SLSA) sponsored the event.

The mission of the summit was to enable all New York State students to be college and career ready by strengthening the critical role of school librarians in teaching and learning.  In addition, the event would serve to plan actions to support increased student achievement within the context of school library services as they relate to curriculum, instruction, assessments and professional development and the proposed Regents Research Requirement for graduation.

As a result of the Summit, consensus was established around a set of mutually agreed, detailed recommendations and supporting action steps, presented to NYSED Senior Managers, to be implemented within 6 to 18 months following the Summit. The desired effect of a NYSED/School Librarian Summit 2014 was to raise the visibility of school library support of student achievement with NYSED Senior Managers, to obtain the necessary NYSED resources if possible, and to accelerate progress towards accomplishing the agreed upon action steps.

Methods

Participation in the Summit was by invitation only, recruiting invitees based on participants’ demonstrated leadership and the NYSED Curriculum Team’s pre-established structure for committee representation.

Divided into five core strand working groups, the participants collaborated via conference call in advance of the Summit to establish essential questions and directives.  The core strand working groups focused on:

  • Administrative Support
  • Program Assessment
  • Professional Development
  • Materials Support
  • Curriculum & Instruction

These working groups provided a structure to the conversations at the Summit, leading to recommendations reached by consensus

The Summit culminated with the presentation of the Summit recommendations to NYSED senior staff and Regents including:

  • James C. Dawson, Board of Regents
  • Roger Tillis, Board of Regents
  • John B. King, Jr. Commissioner of Education
  • Jeffrey Cannell, Deputy Commissioner of Cultural Education
  • Bernard Margolis, State Librarian
  • Carol A. Desch, Division of Library Development (DLD), Coordinator of Statewide Library Services
  • Mary Cahill, SED, Director, Curriculum and Instruction
  • Carlos Ramirez, SED, Coordinator, Educational Technology Policy
  • Karen Balsen, DLD, Outreach, Networking and Regional Advisory Services
  • Christina Coughlin, SED, Coordinator, Education Management Services
  • Kathleen Moorhead, SED, Executive Director, Data Systems and Educational Technology
  • Charles Szuberla, SED, Assistant Commissioner, School Operations and Management Services
  • Renee Rider, Assistant Commissioner, Office of Student Support Services

2014 SCHOOL LIBRARY SUMMIT (SLS14)

Mission

Enable all New York State students to be college and career ready by strengthening the critical role of school librarians and school library programs in teaching and learning.

Vision

Through a partnership of professional library associations, school library systems, state education offices, educators, and community members, a framework and plan will be created to ensure all students have access to quality school library programs, relevant resources and a highly-skilled, certified school librarian in every school.

Framework

The framework is divided into six sections, each with a statement of purpose, recommendations and action steps.

I. Collaborations & Partnerships

The 2014 School Library Summit (SLS14) participants value working together with the State Education Department (SED) to ensure all students have access to relevant resources and information and digital literacy instruction through a quality school library program and a certified school librarian in every school. This collaborative partnership is critical to student success.

1. Recommendation: Foster ongoing conversations among SLS14 lead organizations and multiple offices and departments at SED, for dialog on school librarians, high quality school library resources and excellent information literacy programs can contribute to achievement. 

1.1 Action:  SED offices and departments will invite SLS14 lead organizations to participate along with other education groups and SED staff experts in the development of resources and strategies for implementation of Common Core and other Learning Standards.

1.2 Action: School library systems, working in conjunction with the State Education Department, will continue to investigate ways to leverage local and state funding for the purchasing of electronic content using cooperative purchasing, based on sound instructional and collection development principles.  

II. Development & Distribution of Resources

School libraries and school librarians play a critical, central role in teaching and learning.  In order to ensure that every student has access to a quality school library program and a highly skilled school librarian, it is important that the performance of both school library programs and school librarians be continuously nurtured and assessed.  The library community has developed, and continues to refine, a number of powerful tools for the implementation, assessment and evaluation of quality school library programs and highly skilled school librarians.  These tools include: 

  • The Empire State Information Fluency Continuumexternal link icon, the K-12 framework for the instructional aspects of a library program which forms the basis for the skills and strategies essential for students to become independent readers and learners. The Empire State Information Fluency Continuum is designed to integrate with teacher content areas, endorsed by the School Library Systems Association of New York State and aligned to the Common Core Learning Standards.
  • School Library Media Program Evaluation (SLMPE) Rubric, developed by the NYSED, the SLMPE rubric is a self-assessment instrument for use by teachers, librarians, students, administrators, parents, and school community members to assess the quality of a Library Media Program across 25 different "Essential Elements, " providing qualitative and quantitative evidence to aid in development of action plans for program improvements.
  • The NYLA/SSL/SLSA School Librarian Evaluation Rubric is approved to provide guidance to school districts in evaluating the performance of school librarians in support of the Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR) process. The rubric, base on the Charlotte Danielson framework, was developed in a partnership between the Section of School Librarians (SSL) of NYLA and the School Library Systems Association (SLSA).

The support and assistance of SED in the broad promotion and distribution of these powerful tools will assist school leaders and school librarians in the further improvement of high-quality school library programs across the state.

2. Recommendation:   SLS14 lead organizations will partner with SED on a series of action steps intended to continuously develop and promote materials and resources that aid in the improvement, assessment and evaluation of school library programs and school librarians via multiple channels.  The action steps below are intended to ensure that all students will have access to a quality school library program and a highly skilled school librarian.

2.1 Action: The Empire State Information Fluency Continuum (IFC) will be prominent and accessible on EngageNY, as well as on the newly developed Exemplary School Library Program webpage of the Administrators’ channel of NYSED's website.

2.2 Action:  Creation of an "Exemplary School Library Media Program” web page on the School Administrators’ channel of the NYSED website with a list of key resources to assist administrators in developing and assessing strong school library programs.

2.3 Action: The Empire State Information Fluency Continuum (IFC) becomes an integral part of NYSED teaching and learning resources that contribute to the successful implementation of State learning standards.

2.4 Action: SLS14 lead organizations will partner with SED to ensure that future review teams and resource guide creation groups can embed information fluency skills into curriculum and resource materials.

2.5 Action: Update the Essential Elements on the SLMPE Rubric to reflect current practices in school library programs including Common Core Learning Standards and the Empire State Information Fluency Continuum and develop a toolkit to support the use of the SLMPE Rubric by every school district which will be prominent and accessible on EngageNY.

2.6 Action: Evaluate, update and strengthen the NYLA-SSL/SLSA School Librarian Evaluation Rubric for APPR to reflect current best practices in student learning and instruction.

III. Research & Data

A key component in the improvement of a top quality school library programs is the availability of quantifiable data to benchmark the impact of these services on student outcomes. The data should be online, easy to access, current and comprehensive.

3. Recommendation:  The SLS14 lead organizations will partner with SED to review and update Basic Educational Data System (BEDS) Question 21, which provides critical data annually for multiple audiences about the status of New York State school library programs, resources and staffing.

3.1 Action: Revision of BEDS (Question 21 – Library Program) to reflect current practices and to make easily accessible key data that demonstrates the impact of school library programs and school librarians on student learning.

IV. Resources for Professional Development & Assessment

The school library community recognizes the need for ongoing, quality professional development to ensure that practitioners are continuously refreshed on the most current research and skills to further the delivery of their programs. Further the community understands that providing opportunities for learning about school library programs to other segments of the education ecosystem is key to increasing awareness of critical role of school library programs and school librarians in advancing teaching and learning and in enabling all New York State students to be college and career ready.

IV. Resources for Professional Development & Assessment

4. Recommendation:  The SLS14 lead organizations will come together to advance top quality professional development, evaluated using a consistent format, to be delivered to a wide array of constituents, including pre-service and in-service school librarians, teachers and administrators.

4.1 Action: Develop and implement plan for coherent and sustained development of school librarian competencies, leadership and confidence.

4.2 Action: Provide multiple opportunities for other constituencies to develop understanding of the importance of student access to quality school library programs and a highly skilled school librarian to achieving college and career readiness.

4.3 Action: Develop structures and tools to provide sustained support for professional development for school librarians and other constituencies.

V. Marketing, Communication & Outreach

School library programs led by highly-skilled, certified school librarians play a critical role in enabling New York students to be college and career ready.  But, is every school leader in New York State aware of the positive impact of school librarians and school library programs on student achievement? Do school board members understand the impact of school librarians with strong school library programs on students and communities? Is every teacher aware of the incredible knowledge, skills, expertise and resources a school librarian can provide that will help students succeed?  Is every school librarian able to communicate clearly the importance of the library and its resources to student success to students, parents and the school community?

5. Recommendation: The SLS14 lead organizations, partnering with SED where appropriate, will develop materials that clearly and concisely demonstrate these concepts and deliver that messaging via a wide array of vehicles and channels.

5.1 Action: Promote quality school library programs staffed by certified school librarians as essential to the implementation of the NYS Common Core Learning Standards through curriculum development, technology integration, and assessment.

5.2 Action: Develop a campaign to increase knowledge and understanding among pre-service teachers and school administrators as to the positive impact of highly skilled school librarians, quality school library programs on student college and career readiness.

5.3 Action: Professional organizations, in conjunction with SED, will establish a communication system with representatives from SSL, SED, iSchools, New York State United Teachers (NYSUT), New York State School Boards Association (NYSSBA) and administrators’ organizations School Administrators Association of New York State (SAANYS) and New York State Council of School Superintendents (NYSCOSS) to tell the story of the impact on all students’ college and career readiness through access to relevant resources and a certified school librarian in every school.

5.4 Action: Professional organizations, in conjunction with SED, will increase awareness among administrators and librarians regarding the effective usage of categorical School Library Materials Aid through outreach and education.

5.5 Action:  Professional organizations will provide resources and training to empower school librarians to develop active and sustained approaches to advocacy locally within the school and with their external partners.

VI. Funding and Legislation

As with so many things, funding is an essential ingredient for strong libraries.  As part of NYS’s education infrastructure, State education funding and legislation can significantly impact school library programs.

6. Recommendation: NYLA and the school library community will provide support to SED in advancing a recommendation for the increase of School Library Materials Aid, as well as other legislative actions that will improve school library programs.

6.1 Action: NYLA, working in partnership with SLS14 lead organizations and SED, will review current school librarian and School Library Materials Aid data, assess needs, and formulate a proposal for an increase in School Library Materials Aid.

6.2 Action: NYLA and the school library community will provide support to SED in advancing a recommendation for the increase of School Library Systems aid as a key part of the infrastructure and leadership for achieving many of the SLS14 recommendations and action steps. The SLS has a key role in improving communications, delivering professional development and improving library programs 

through leadership and collaboration, particularly with technology and e-resources.

6.3 Action: NYLA, working in partnership with SLS14 lead organizations, will continue to support legislation at the state and national levels that will ensure that all New York State students have access to quality school library programs, relevant resources and a highly-skilled, certified school librarian in every school.

Progress Report


2014 NYLA/SSL/SLSA/SED SCHOOL LIBRARY SUMMIT PARTICIPANTS

CHAIRS:

Sara Kelly Johns, New York Library Association President, 2013-14

Jeremy Johannassen, New York Library Association Executive Director

John Brock, State Education Department, School Library Services

STEERING COMMITTEE:

Cassandra Artale, Beatrice Baaden, Susan Bartle, Katie Bertrand, John Brock, Michael Cambria, Carol Desch, Judi Dzikowski, Mary Beth Farr, Richard Hasenyager, Melissa Jacobs Israel, Paige Jaeger, Jeremy Johannesen, Sara Kelly Johns, Susan Kowalski. Jill Leinung, Bernard Margolis, Susan Polos, Carlos Ramirez, Frances Roscello, Karen Sperrazza, Barbara Kay Stripling
 

Resources for Professional Development & Assessment

  • Administrative Support Group  (Sara Kelly Johns, Susan Kowalski)
  • Curriculum and Instruction Group (Mary Ratzer/Paige Jaeger, Susan Polos)
  • Materials Support Group (Frances Roscello, Karen Sperrazza)
  • Professional Development Group (Barbara Stripling, Beatrice Baaden)
  • Program Assessment Group (Jill Leinung, Melissa Jacobs Israel)

  • BOARD OF REGENT MEMBERS AND NYSED SENIOR MANAGERS
    • James C. Dawson, Board of Regents
    • Roger Tillis, Board of Regents
    • John B. King, Jr. Commissioner of Education
    • Jeffrey Cannell, Deputy Commissioner of Cultural Education
    • Bernard Margolis, State Librarian
    • Carol A. Desch, Division of Library Development (DLD), Coordinator of Statewide Library Services
    • Mary Cahill, SED, Director, Curriculum and Instruction
    • Karen Balsen, DLD, Outreach, Networking and Regional Advisory Services
    • Christina Coughlin, SED, Coordinator, Education Management Services
    • Kathleen Moorhead, SED, Executive Director, Data Systems and Educational Technology
    • Charles Szuberla, SED, Assistant Commissioner, School Operations and Management Services
    • Renee Rider, Deputy Commissioner, Office of Student Support Services

 

SUMMIT PARTICIPANTS

  • Beatrice Baaden
    Palmer School of Library and Information Science, LIU

  • Robert E. Berkowitz
    Co-Founder, Big6

  • Katie Bertrand
    Monroe #1 BOCES SLS,
    SLSA President, 2013-14

  • John Brock
    SED, School Library Services

  • Laurie Brooks
    Institute of Museum and Library Services (Ret.)

  • Michael Cambria
    Buffalo City SLS

  • Jen Cannell
    Questar III SLS

  • Michelle Costello
    SUNY Geneseo, Milne Library

  • Margaux DelGuidice-Calemmo
    Garden City High School

  • Carol A. Desch
    New York State Ed - Division of Library Development

  • Donna DeSiato
    Superintendent, East Syracuse-Minoa CSD

  • Judi Dzikowsk
    Rosen Digital Publishing/Syracuse University

  • Ellen Frank
    Flushing High School

  • Barbara Geidel
    Walton Central School District Townsend Elementary

  • Richard Hasenyager
    Director, NYC SLS

  • Mindy Holland
    Mohonasen Schools

  • Glen Huot
    Regional Information Center, Monroe 1 BOCES

  • Jill Hurst-Wahl
    Syracuse University, School of Information Studies

  • Anthony “Will” Jaacks
    SED, Curriculum and Instructions, Science

  • Melissa Jacobs Israel
    New York City SLS
    SLSA President-Elect, 2013-14

  • Jeremy Johannesen
    NYLA Executive Director

  • Sara Kelly Johns
    NYLA President, 2013-14

  • Vicki Jones
    SED, Instructional Support and Development

  • Sue Kowalski
    Pine Grove Middle School, East Syracuse-Minoa CSD
    NYLA/SSL Past President, 2013-14

  • Jill Leinung
    East Greenbush Central Schools
    NYLA/SSL President-Elect, 2013-14

  • Rose Luna
    Freeport High School

  • Carri Manchester
    SED. Student Support Services

  • Robert Matthews
    Hudson Valley Community College Marvin Library

  • Lisa Perkowski
    Port Jervis Middle School

  • J'aime Pfeiffer
    Capital Region BOCES SLS

  • Susan Polos
    Bedford Central School District, Mt. Kisco Elementary School

  • Carlos Ramirez
    SED, Coordinator, Educational Technology Policy

  • Mary Ratzer
    Consultant/Author

  • Stephanie Rosalia
    PS/MS 105Q The Bay School

  • Frances Roscello
    SED, School Library Services (Ret.)

  • Colleen Sadowski
    Director, School Library Services
    Rochester City School District

  • Annette Schiano
    Gates-Chili Central School District

  • Elizabeth Sheffer
    NYSUT

  • Kathy Southwell
    East Syracuse Minoa

  • Amy Jo Southworth
    Bay Shore High School

  • Karen Sperrazza
    NYLA/SSL President, 2013-14

  • Joette Stefl-Mabry
    University at Albany

  • Cynthia Stocker
    Assist. Superintendent,
    Central Valley CSD

  • Barbara Stripling
    Syracuse University

  • Carl Vitevitch
    Nassau BOCES SLS

  • Diana Wendell
    Madison-Oneida BOCES School Library System

  • Linda Williams Bowie
    New Visions for Public Schools

  • Leslie Yolan
    SED, Arts in Education

FURTHER READING

American Association of School Librarians. (2014). AASL Best apps for teaching and learning. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/standards-guidelines/best-apps.External link icon

American Association of School Librarians. (2013). Best websites for teaching & learning.     Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/standards-guidelines/best-websites/2013.External link icon

American Association of School Librarians. (2014). Causality: School libraries and student success (CLASS). [White paper]. American Association of School Librarians National Research Forum. Retrieved from               http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/researchandstatistics/CLASSWhitePaper_6-24-14_DRAFT.pdf.External link icon

American Association of School Librarians. (n.d.) Essential links: Resources for school library program development; Performance evaluation of school librarians.  Retrieved from               http://aasl.ala.org/essentiallinks/index.php?title=Performance_Evaluation_of_School_LibrariansExternal link icon.

American Association of School Librarians.  (n.d.) Learning 4 Life (L4L) Implementation resources; Resources for applying the AASL Standard’s for the 21st Century Learner to your everyday practice. [PDF brochure]. Retrieved from           http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learning4life/resources/brochure.pdf.External link icon

American Association of School Librarians. (n.d). AASL Student Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards crosswalk. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/standards-guidelines/crosswalk.External link icon

American Association of School Librarians. (2007). Standards for the 21st-century learner in action. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/standards-guidelines/in-action.External link icon

Horizon Project. (2014).  NMC Horizon report; 2014 K-12 edition, preview. 2014. Retrieved from http://www.nmc.org/publications/2014-horizon-report-k12.External link icon

Institute of Museum and Library Services. (2013). Growing young minds: How museums and libraries create lifelong learners. Retrieved from         http://www.imls.gov/assets/1/AssetManager/GrowingYoungMinds.pdf.External link icon

International Society for Technology in Education. (2014). Standards for students. Retrieved from http://www.iste.org/standards/standards-for-students.External link icon

Library Research Service. (2014). School library impact studies.  Retrieved from        http://www.lrs.org/data-tools/school-libraries/impact-studies/.External link icon

New York City Department of Education (n.d.) Citizenship in the Digital Age. Standards and Curriculum. Retrieved from              http://schools.nyc.gov/academics/libraryservices/standardsandcurriculum/default.htm.External link icon

New York City Department of Education. School Library System Association of New York State, (n.d.) Empire State Information Fluency Continuum. Retrieved from http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/1A931D4E-1620-4672-ABEF-460A273D0D5F/0/EmpireStateIFC.pdf.External link icon

New York Comprehensive Center. (2011). Informational brief: Impact of school libraries on student achievement. October 2011. Retrieved from               http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/nyla/nycc_school_library_brief.pdf.Portable Document Format icon (287KB)

New York Library Association. (2013). NYLA-SSL/SLSA School Librarian Evaluation Rubric.      Retrieved from http://usny.nysed.gov/rttt/teachers-leaders/practicerubrics/#ATPR.

New York State Education Department. (2014, July). J. D’Agati, EdTPA retake options. [Memorandum to the NYS Board of Regents]. Retrieved from               http://www.regents.nysed.gov/meetings/2014/July2014/714brca3.pdf. Portable Document Format icon (390KB)

New York State Education Department. Information and Reporting Service. (2013, June). Basic Education Data System, Institutional master file, public school form, question 21. Retrieved from http://www.p12.nysed.gov/irs/beds/home.html.

New York State Education Department. (2010). NYSED School Library Media Program Evaluation (SLMPE) Rubric. Retrieved from http://www.p12.nysed.gov/technology/library/SLMPE_rubric/.

Regents Advisory Council for Libraries to the New York State Board of Regents. (2013, June). Proposed Revision – CR 91.2. 8 NYCRR 91.2. Employment of school library media specialist. Draft. Wiki posting. Retrieved from http://librarysummit.wikispaces.com/file/detail/Current%20and%20Proposed%208%20NYCRR %2091.2%20Regulation.docx.

Regents Advisory Council for Libraries to the New York State Board of Regents. Creating the Future: A 2020 vision and plan for library service in New York State. Retrieved from               http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/adviscns/rac/2020final/2020final.pdf .Portable Document Format icon (390KB)

Small, R. V., Snyder, J., & Parker, K. (2009). The impact of New York’s school libraries on student achievement and motivation: Phase I. School Library Media Research, 12. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aasl/slmr/volume12/small-snyder-parker.External link icon

St. John Fisher College, Lavery Library. (2011). Highlights of the School Library 3-Hour Field Experience for St. John Fisher Pre-Service Teachers. Retrieved from http://acrl.ala.org/2011presprogram/?p=25.External link icon

Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE). (2013). EdTPA assessment handbook: Library specialist. Retrieved from http://edtpa.aacte.org/ External link icon

Student Achievement Partners.  (n.d.). Achieve the Core. Retrieved from http://achievethecore.org/.External link icon

Last Updated: December 16, 2014