EdTech

Educational Design and Technology

New York State EETT Competitive Grant Program (2008-09)

Broome – Tioga BOCES

Project Title: MATH: 4u + me

Theme focus: Data-driven Differentiated Instruction and Learning

MATH: 4u + me represents the collective efforts of Brome – Tioga BOCES and 15 public and non-public school districts. The project is framed by the overarching goal of creating a technologically supported, data-driven system of teaching/learning designed to meet the needs of ALL secondary math students through differentiated instructional approaches. This project will impact 10,000 secondary students over the next three academic years, 5,000 of whom will be the primary participants as they matriculate through secondary algebra and geometry.

The project builds upon a successful regional curriculum-writing effort launched in 2006 in which teams of teachers from across the region gathered and wrote a new secondary algebra curriculum in response to NYSED’s release of the new math content and process strands. This effort was continued in 2007 with the creation of the basic framework for a regional geometry curriculum. Under the current EETT grant, teacher design teams will continue this groundbreaking curriculum development work in an effort to use specific technological applications to facilitate design, piloting and sharing and evaluating differentiated lessons and related assessments.

Over the next two years, up to 120 secondary math teachers will gather periodically in multi-day sessions, and use research-based processes to:

  • Collectively write new lessons/tasks in algebra and geometry.
  •  Create new related assessments and engage in on-going action-research using these assessments.
  • Integrate into the new curricula the technological tools for differentiation, including, but not limited to, equipment, software and expertise in the use of graphing calculators and the new world of portable learning made available through portable digital media players and related applications.
  • Form and participate in both teacher-driven and student-driven regional, online learning communities.
  • Engage in a study of the Acuity on-line assessment system.

Project Contact:
Patricia Kuenecke, Project Director
Supervisor, School and Curriculum Improvement
and Educational Leadership Services
E-mail: pkueneck@btboces.org
(607) 766-3786
Broome – Tioga BOCES
435 Glenwood Road
Binghamton, NY 13905

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Buffalo City School District

M3 Partnership for Science

Theme focus: Technology Infusion into Instruction through Professional Development

Buffalo is the second poorest city in the country with 39% of residents living in poverty. The poverty rate for families with children is even higher with 28,596 students (78.3%) receiving free or reduced price lunch. This project will serve 2,181 students in 7th and 8th grade who attend twelve (12) SURR schools and one nonpublic school. The participating schools have the highest percentage of children living in poverty and the highest percentage of students scoring below the NYS standard for science. Sixteen (16) 7th and 8th grade science teachers will participate in a minimum of 100 hours of professional development and coaching. The professional development includes Summer Institutes, bi-weekly meetings during the school year, and mentoring/ coaching. This project supports student learning by:

  • Developing and implementing an online curriculum mapping and formative assessment tool for grades 7 and 8 science
  • Installing multimedia classroom components in sixteen (16) classrooms
    • interactive whiteboard
    • laptop computer
    • document camera (visualizer)
    • student response system
    • digital video equipment
    • probeware
    • digital microscope
  • Providing ongoing professional development by higher education partners
  • In-school and in-classroom support by four (4) embedded higher education coaches and one (1) Buffalo science technology support teacher
  • External program evaluation

This project is based on research that has identified many specific pedagogies and innovations for science teaching that increase student engagement, are aligned with National and NYS Science Standards and increase student achievement (Newmann, 2003). Among the most impressive are those using new multimodal technologies and multidimensional approaches to develop diverse students’ understanding of science concepts (e.g., using visualization through Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs), composing understanding through digital videos, developing science vocabulary through multimodal literacy strategies, learning to “do” science with hands-on inquiries). The integration of these research-based promising practices under the umbrella of the multimodal, multidimensional model (M3) of science teaching occurs through the use of affordable, cutting-edge technologies that include innovative uses of the IWBs, student response systems, digital video cameras, visualizers, probeware, digital microscopes, and a variety of web-based resources for science teaching and learning.

The professional development for this project is based on research which found that student assessments tended to be higher when their teachers have engaged in high-quality professional development with hands-on activities and technologies (Wenglinsky, 2000). Lipton, Wellman and Humbard (2002) speak to the importance of providing job embedded support to teachers. Mentoring/coaching are practices that have been shown to be effective in strengthening teachers’ skills (Loucks-Horsley et al., 2002).

Project Contact:
Diane Cart, Project Administrator
Office of Federal and State Programs
E-mail: DCart@buffaloschools.org
Phone: (716) 816-3966 / Fax: (716) 851-3554
Buffalo Public Schools
408 City Hall
Buffalo, New York 14202

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Erie 1 BOCES

Theme focus: Leadership and System Change through Technology Innovation

Administrators and teacher leaders of the 19 component districts of Erie 1 BOCES and the 48 non-public schools within these districts’ geographical boundaries will be participating in workshops and collaborations in virtual learning communities to learn what it takes to be a leader in the 21st Century. Based on a needs assessment done at the beginning of this project, these leaders will have the opportunity to practice and implement what they learn with one-on-one support from the staff developers from the curriculum and technology divisions of Erie 1 BOCES and the WNYRIC. In addition to supporting the leaders, the staff developers will also be working one-on-one or in small groups with teachers in the SINI school to address their identified gaps using technologies purchased for the school through the grant.

July 14, 2008- EETT- Leadership Kickoff

  • The Dimensions of Change within Schools in the 21st Century
    Today's changing world challenges us to re-envision what we do in our schools and classrooms or risk a growing irrelevance in our students’ lives. And at the core of this challenge is how well we realize the potentials of today's emerging technologies in our own professional and personal learning practice as educational leaders. Participants will discuss how schools have changed and how they need to change to meet the demands of a modern world and remain relevant in the lives of the students they teach.
  • Effective School Leadership through Technology: the 21st Century Administrator
  • Digital Citizenship: Current Internet Issues for School Leaders
October 6, 2008- Building 21st Century Schools
  • Top Web 2.0 Tools for Leadership
    Connectivity has a tremendous impact on the way leaders will, and should, communicate. This segment of the workshop will provide leaders with an understanding of Web 2.0 tools and provide hands-on practice with several powerful tools that should be part of their leadership communication strategy.
  • Engaging Staff & Students: Using Web 2.0 Tools for Global Collaboration
November 13, 2008
  • Guiding Student Learning in the 21st Century
    A passionate student is a learning student. As the people of the world are becoming increasingly connected, the nature, use, ownership, and purpose of knowledge are changing in profound ways. Our goal as educators is to leverage these connections and changes as powerful means to improve teaching and learning in our schools. Come listen as Sheryl stirs a sense of urgency for shifting classroom practice toward more engaging approaches that unleash the passion that lies within each learner. School leaders in this session will explore new and innovative ways to approach learning to help all students become adaptive experts and apply the skills they learn to real world situations.
  • Creating Environments that Support Learning: The Role of Emerging Technologies in the Core Curriculum
December 8, 2008
  • Implementing 21st Century Skills: Steps to Build Momentum
    If using technology is so easy, why is implementation so difficult? Preparing students for the 21st Century calls for collective action of all stakeholders. This segment of the workshop looks at the steps needed to build momentum and garner buy-in from the entire school community. Participants will discuss ways to plan collectively and strategically for the future, develop a professional development plan for 21st Century skill building, and make sure all students have equitable access to a 21st century education.
  • Where Do We Go from Here?
  • 21st Century Project Showcase

Project Contact:
Barbara Mocarski, Manager
Erie 1 BOCES Instructional Resources Team
E-mail: bmocarski@e1b.org
Phone: (716) 821-7382 / Fax: (716) XXX-XXXX
355 Harlem Road
West Seneca, NY 14224

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Hamilton-Fulton-Montgomery BOCES

Theme focus: Leadership and System Change through Technology Innovation

Hamilton-Fulton-Montgomery BOCES has been awarded a $650,000, two-year Enhancing Education Through Technology grant that in part will give middle school students the chance to teach their teachers about technology.

Area teachers and students from 30 public and private middle schools in the HFM BOCES and WSWHE BOCES region will collaborate to use technology as a tool to improve student performance in English language arts, mathematics and science. The state is offering this grant to help meet the federal goal that all students will demonstrate technology literacy by the end of eighth grade.

The grant provides stipends for teachers in eight districts to become digital learning specialists (DLS). Specialists will offer mentoring and training to their building colleagues to help integrate technology into classroom instruction. Additionally, the specialists form a regional team to provide technology training for teachers in all participating districts. Currently, the Greater Amsterdam and Gloversville Enlarged School Districts have digital learning specialists thanks to a previous Enhancing Education Through Technology grant. This new project will add six other districts to the DLS network: Fonda-Fultonville, Fort Plain, Lake Pleasant, Mayfield, St. Johnsville and Wheelerville.

Partnering with a national organization, Generation Yes and its founder Dr. Dennis Harper, the grant provides for the 30 participating districts to develop and sponsor active New York State Student Technology Leader clubs. This summer, selected middle-school students will attend a week-long camp where they will learn leadership strategies to assist their peers in demonstrating their technology literacy. The students will also gain skills to assist their teachers on how to infuse technology into classroom lessons with the goals of sustaining student interest and improving student achievement.

Under the grant, students will teach their digital “native” language
Today’s students are the first generation to grow up immersed in digital technology, making them “digital natives,” according to Mark Prensky, an educational technology consultant. Students speak and understand technology as their “native language.” This grant program allows teachers and students to work together to cross the divide between the digital natives and many teachers who are learning to become more technologically adept.

Detailed information on Generation Yes is available on their Web site: http://www.genyes.com external link.
This story is posted at HFM BOCES Web site external link

Project Contact:
Dr. Lorraine Hohenforst
Assistant Superintendent
E-mail: lhohenforst@hfmboces.org

Ms. Stacy Ward
Coordinator of Instructional Services
E-mail: sward@hfmboces.org
(518)736-4305

Hamilton-Fulton-Montgomery BOCES
2755 STHWY 67
Johnstown, NY 12095

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Madison-Oneida BOCES

Theme focus: The Expanding Learning Opportunities through Online Teaching and Learning

The New York State Education Department recently awarded an Enhancing Education Through Technology grant totaling $850,000 to the Madison-Oneida BOCES and the Mohawk Regional Information Center, in conjunction with 41 school districts and 8 private schools throughout the Central New York region.

The competitive grant was awarded over a two-year period to develop programs that effectively use technology in the teaching and learning process to improve students’ academic performance in English Language Arts and Mathematics. The award will impact 142 schools and over 60,000 students in grades K-12.

Tracy Clark, Assistant Director for Instruction at the Mohawk Regional Information Center explains that funding will be used to provide area schools with access to a number of critical technology tools. All teachers and students will be provided with netTrekker accounts. NetTrekker is an educational search engine that enables users to quickly access over 180,000 educationally relevant web resources and images. In addition, Gizmos from Explore Learning, will be provided to math classes in grades 9-12. Gizmos are on-line simulations that present math concepts as visual interactive models. Teachers will also have the opportunity to develop online professional development courses utilizing Angel Learning. The courses will focus on technology integration in the classroom and once developed will subsequently be available to teachers in every school.

In addition, the Mohawk Regional Information Center, a division of Madison-Oneida BOCES, will provide teachers with professional development on the effective uses of these technology tools and how they can best be integrated into instruction.

Project Contact:
Tracy Clark, Ed.D.
Coordinating Director
Instructional Technology
E-mail: tclark@moric.org
Phone: (315) 361-2813 / Fax: (315) 361-5595
Mohawk Regional Information Center
4937 Spring Rd, Verona NY 13478

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Nassau BOCES

FINDING THEIR VOICES THROUGH MULTIMEDIA LEARNING
(Empowering English Language Learner Students for Success)

Theme focus: Leadership and System Change through Technology Innovation

Nassau, Eastern Suffolk and Western Suffolk BOCES have collaboratively planned and designed an innovative research-based initiative in partnership with ten (10) high need school districts serving a poverty population of over 10,000 students. The participating districts are Amityville, Brentwood, Central Islip, Copiague, Freeport, Glen Cove, Hempstead, Riverhead, Roosevelt, William Floyd, and Wyandanch. The purpose of the project is to increase the performance of English language learner (ELL) students in core academic areas with a concentration on English language arts through effective use of media and technology in grades five through eight. The media and technology content will use the New York State performance indicators as a backdrop to measure the core academic content knowledge. Student leadership will be fostered using professional development, media and technology thus allowing the project to directly address the theme of “Leadership and System Change through Technology Innovation.” This project forms a network of partners to provide resources, support and strategies to inform professional development, design materials, create an online learning and sharing environment, support data driven decision-making and provide for the analysis of data through technology-based interventions.

Finding Their Voices Through Multimedia Learning establishes a project-based learning model that utilizes innovative technology strategies. The overarching goals of the project are focused on improving the achievement of ELL students by introducing highly motivating project based activities that integrate media and technology to develop critical content skills and support 21st Century Learning Standards: Specifically. ELL teachers will model greater consistency and coherency in instruction related to core content areas through the use of technology based instruction.

The central activities to build leadership talent and abilities for ELL students will include: (1) providing the opportunity to design, create and share multi-media stories about their experiences as ELL students. These stories will include cultural, family and learning narratives that helped them express themselves in their new bilingual world; (2) ELL students will design leadership seminars/discussions focused on their stories. These seminars will help non-ELL students and teachers to be able to better understand the differences and similarities between ELLs and non-ELLs; (3) Teachers will receive professional development to allow them to use the stories and seminars to further develop student literacy and content area skills. (4) Data will be collected and correlated to help teachers support decision making and customized instructional approaches for ELL students; (5) An online resource bank of professional development strategies and resources will be created for teachers; (6) Teachers and students will be connected to classes and students around the nation -- sharing their stories, seminars and learning strategies.

This project builds an extensive collaborative network ranging from partnerships with New York State Teachers Centers to New York Institute of Technology. Participating non- public schools will participate fully in all grant activities and will receive the same materials.

Project Contact:
Patricia Koehler, Supervisor
Regional Professional Development
Data Analysis and Curriculum Support
Online Learning & Video Conferencing
E-mail: PKOEHLER@mail.nasboces.org
Phone: (516) 608-6655 / Fax: (516) 608-6625
Nassau BOCES, Model Schools
71 Clinton Road, PO Box 9195
Garden City, NY 11530

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Niagara Falls City School District

Theme focus: Technology Infusion Into Instruction through Professional Development

Niagara Falls City School District and its collaborating partners, Dunkirk City School District, Lockport City School District and North Tonawanda City School District, propose to implement a Title II D – EETT project to address theme #2: Technology Infusion Into Instruction through Professional Development. The project, Technology-Based Education Strategies Training, or T-Best, will provide professional development in the use of interactive interactive whiteboards, Tablet PCs and Podcasting, with each District implementing a professional development strategy that aligns with District initiatives and goals. These four Districts serve 5,002 students in poverty. Approximately 300 teachers will be trained each year, and each District will train support team members who will provide District-based support for teachers as they integrate selected technologies into core subject instruction.

Project Contact:
Katharine M. Guthrie
Teacher on Special Assignment
E-mail: KMGuthrie@nfschools.net
(716) 286-4196
Niagara Falls City School District
607 Walnut Ave.
Niagara Falls, NY 14301

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NYC Districts 1 and 2

Manhattan's Roadmap to Twenty-first Century High Schools

Theme focus: Leadership and System Change through Technology Innovation

Who is preparing our students for the jobs that await them when they graduate? Business leaders, economists, politicians, futurists and many educational leaders all seem to agree that it is not the American School system. It is predicted that by the year 2015 forty percent of the current workforce will retire. Are our students prepared to fill this void? In 1950, 60% of the workforce was unskilled. In 2004, 65% were employed in skilled jobs. According to Innovate America, U.S. Council on Competitiveness, the number of jobs requiring technical training is growing at five times the rate of other occupations. Many of these jobs require mastery of engineering, mechanical, and computer driven control systems. There will be a great demand for multidisciplinary learners and workers, with expertise in many areas and capable of adapting to changing demands of the workplace. Tolerances are getting tighter and tighter, human resource specialists are warning educators that “we need people who can work with their heads and their hands.” According to analyst Jim Brazell only 20% of tomorrow’s jobs will require a 4 year college degree, 65% will require an associate’s degree, but most will need advanced skill training in a certification program.

It is indisputable that the critical thinking, problem solving, information literacy, knowledge management, technology, and global communication skills required for success in the twenty-first century demand drastic reforms and pedagogical changes to current teaching and learning environments. The preponderance of disengaged high school students and excessive drop out rates nationwide support this premise. Students themselves recognize that there is a divide between what they learn in school and the world they encounter outside the classroom. Preparing students to be successful requires them to be armed with strategies to become self-directed learners who manage their own learning in an environment where distance, time and location are irrelevant.

New York City Community School Districts 1 and 2, located in the lower part of Manhattan, are facing this challenge by seeking to create three model twenty-first century high schools. In collaboration, and with support from outside experts, the staffs of these schools will examine and implement reforms that engage high school students in meaningful, authentic interdisciplinary learning experiences that develop knowledge acquisition and productivity skills and provide multiple opportunities to gain deep understandings and demonstrate mastery of the curriculum content, as it relates to the world around them. The impetus and mechanisms to finally transform classrooms everywhere is the availability of high speed Internet access in school and at home and increased access to rolling laptop carts, LCD projectors, interactive white boards, and web 2.0 tools. These fundamental requirements along with a willing and able school administration and staff are the grant criteria with which the candidates for becoming a model school were chosen. The goal of year one is to meet the Essential Conditions for the ISTE standards and the goal of year two is to ensure that administrators, teachers and students have met all the ISTE standards for the twenty-first century. Year one will focus on creating a school vision, implementing exemplary interdisciplinary and content specific projects, and providing push-in and pull-out professional development opportunities on instructional practice, project-based learning and technology integration. Year two will continue to build on this work and teachers will independently create exemplary technology-rich, curriculum lessons. Schools will be encouraged to establish skill-based certification programs to help students prepare for the job market. Strong robotics programs will be implemented in all three model schools.

This project will be carefully documented on the web and transparent to all the remaining public and nonpublic high schools located in these districts. It is hoped that the impact of this work will be evident in all of the district’s high schools as they share in our quest, explore the research, attend the Office of Instructional Technology citywide workshops, replicate best practices, and participate in the online discussions where the model schools share their challenges and successes.

Project Contact:
Teresa Bader
E-mail: TBader@schools.nyc.gov
Phone: (347) 463-0279 / Fax: (917) 521-3618
Borough Instructional Technology

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NYC Districts 5 and 6

Manhattan's Roadmap to Twenty-first Century Elementary Schools

Theme focus: Leadership and System Change through Technology Innovation

Who is preparing our students for the future that awaits them? Business leaders, economists, politicians, futurists and many educational leaders all seem to agree that it is not the current American School system. Our country’s success as a global leader in the industrial age was a direct result of an excellent educational system specifically designed to prepare that generation’s workforce. Today’s educational system is facing the challenge of preparing this generation of students for a far different job market. The impact of today’s globally competitive yet interdependent economic, political, informational, and communication structures requires our students to possess completely different skill sets that cross many disciplines. The critical thinking, problem solving, informational literacy, knowledge management, technology, web 2.0, global communication and collaboration skills required for success in the twenty-first century, demand drastic reforms and pedagogical changes to current teaching and learning environments.

New York City Community School Districts 5 and 6, located in the northern part of Manhattan, are facing this challenge by seeking to create three model twenty-first century elementary schools. In collaboration and with support from outside experts, the staffs of these schools will examine and implement reforms that engage elementary students in meaningful, authentic learning experiences that provide opportunities to gain deep understandings of the curriculum content while helping them achieve the ISTE Next Generation technology standards. Twenty-first century students need to be critical thinkers, creative problem solvers, innovators, visionaries, and team builders; all capable of adapting and independently learning new information.

Students will be armed with strategies to become self-directed learners who can manage their own learning in an environment where distance, time and location become irrelevant to the process. Students will develop the ability to locate and synthesize important information and articulate and share conclusions in multiple forums. These knowledge acquisition and productivity skills necessitate that our students understand the significance and consequences of publishing content on the web.

The goal of year one is to meet the Essential Conditions for the ISTE standards and the goal of year two is to create a learning environment that ensures that administrators, teachers and students all actually meet the ISTE Standards. Year one will focus on creating a school vision, implementing model exemplary grade level projects, and providing push-in and pull-out professional development opportunities on instructional practice, project-based learning and technology integration. Year two will continue to build on this work and teachers will independently create exemplary technology-rich, curriculum lessons.

This project will be carefully documented on the web and transparent to all the remaining public and nonpublic elementary schools located in these districts. It is hoped that the impact of this work will be evident in all of the district’s elementary schools as they share in our quest, explore the research, attend the Office of Instructional Technology citywide workshops, replicate best practices, and participate in the online discussions, where the model schools share their challenges and successes.

The twenty-first learning environment doesn’t just wait for teachable moments; it literally creates them. This grant will demonstrate how schools can transform themselves through leadership, staff collaboration, and innovative technologies geared to engage and educate a new generation of learners.

Project Contact:
Teresa Bader
E-mail: TBader@schools.nyc.gov
Phone: (347) 463-0279 / Fax: (917) 521-3618
Borough Instructional Technology

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NYC Districts 9 and 7

Transforming Leadership into 21st Century Schools: Inclusive, Innovative, Interdisciplinary

Theme focus: Technology Infusion Into Instruction through Professional Development

New York City Department of Education Districts 9 and 7 are collaborating with the Bronx Office of Instructional Technology, National Staff Development Council (NSDC), and Fordham University, to apply as an “Eligible Local Partnership.” Districts 9 and 7 along with Fordham University propose: “Transforming Leadership into 21st Century Schools: Inclusive, Innovative, Interdisciplinary”; an initiative that will make a positive impact on the academic achievement of students in grades K-12 schools living in the applying districts. According to the 2000 census, the poverty rate for this area of the Bronx is 41.5%.

The goal of this project is to raise student achievement levels appreciably by changing the instructional environment of schools, and providing professional development opportunities to school-based teams. For the purposes of this proposal, school-based teams will consist of a school administrator, instructional technology specialist, and a content area specialist (coach or lead teacher).

The targeted school-based teams will receive professional development in three identified core competency areas: (1) training skills development as they relate to the adult learner; (2) 21st Century technology skills development; and (3) technology integration in English Language Arts (ELA) using Web 2.0 collaboration tools. The professional development providers will be district-level Instructional Technology Specialists, and Fordham University’s RETC-Center for Professional Development.

Project Contact:
Lindsay Crystal
Director
E-mail: CLindsay@schools.nyc.gov
Phone: (718) 741-8634 / Fax: (718) 741-7971
Bronx Borough Instructional Technology
250 East 164th Street
Bronx, NY 10456

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NYC Districts 13 and 14

Science Technology Infused Projects — Science TIP

Theme focus: Technology Literacy and ICT Skills Development and Assessment

Within the current education system, U.S. students are not obtaining the science knowledge they need to succeed. As Rising Above the Gathering Storm notes: “The danger exists that Americans may not know enough about science, technology, or mathematics to contribute significantly to, or fully benefit from, the knowledge-based economy that is already taking shape around us.” Almost thirty percent of students in their first year of college are forced to take remedial science and math classes because they are not prepared for college-level courses.

To address this problem, on March 6, 2007, New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Joel I. Klein announced that the NYC Department of Education would invest $60 million in grades 4-8 classroom materials and support for schools to implement the City’s first-ever core science curriculum starting in the 2007-08 school year. The new citywide science curriculum, which builds on the Mayor’s plan for $444 million in new science labs and equipment, will be accompanied by rigorous new standards. New York City is acting now to address the critical needs of science and technology to ensure the education system will produce the next generation of brilliant innovators.

This proposed EETT grant would provide critical knowledge and strategies to both the national need stated above as well as significantly address the emphasis that New York City is now placing on science education. NYC Districts 13 and 14 contain 28,370 students identified as in poverty in Attachment 1 of the EETT application. Ten middle schools have been identified as SINI, SURR, or needing corrective action. Given the New York City emphasis on science in grades 4-8, this proposal aims to focus on all 17 middle schools that are part of these low performing District 13 and 14 schools (directly affecting about 3,600 7th grade students).

Science teachers who teach 7th grade in each of the eighteen participating schools will attend 3-days of workshops in the spring of 2008 to learn how to utilize project-based techniques to improve their students’ learning. Workshop content will include using modern technologies, robotics, and the Internet to motivate their students.

Providing ongoing and onsite support to these teachers will be accomplished by participation in the Science TIP program. Each teacher will choose two students from each of his or her science class sections to become a school-wide Science TIP Peer Mentor. One science teacher will become the Science TIP Advisor and will monitor the Peer Mentors. This group of Peer Mentors will assist science teachers as their students complete two technology-infused science projects during the 2008-09 school year. Many science projects will be produced annually in the seventeen participating middle schools. Science teachers will assess the projects’ science content and the Peer Mentors working with the Science TIP Advisor will determine whether the projects show mastery of the ISTE NETS technology standards. This means that projects not only help science learning but also enable students to become nationally TechYES certified and thus meet the NCLB mandate of every 8th grade students being technology literate.

Finally, because technology-infused academic projects have proven so effective, additional District 13 and 14 public and private school teachers will have the opportunity to take a series of TIP two and four hour workshops throughout the grant period.

Project Contact:
Feaster Barbara
E-mail: BFeaster@schools.nyc.gov
Phone: (718) 935-4275 / Fax: (718) 935-4456
Borough Instructional Technology

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NYC Districts 17 and 20

Project ICT

Theme focus: Technology Literacy and ICT Skills Development and Assessment

The primary purpose of Project ICT is to improve teaching and learning through the integration of Information Communication Technology (ICT) skills. The use of these interactive instructional resources will support New York State standards-based core curricula instruction. This project is the result of collaboration with 12 public and 9 non-public school participants. During the two year funding period, Project ICT will impact 375 teachers and approximately 10,000 students in grades 3-12.

The focal point of Project ICT will be the development of a Connected Learning Community (CLC). This online learning platform will align core curricula content with authentic learning experiences to create portals of learning opportunities with school-based, local, national and global communities. Comprehensive professional development activities will be provided to support the smooth infusion of 21st century instructional tools to school leaders, teachers and students who will use and support their school’s CLC portal. Professional development opportunities will assure that students and teachers can create educational settings where students can explore and join learning communities around the globe that engage their interests and develop strong academic skills. The project will also support instructional leaders by providing them with the information needed to make innovative and meaningful decisions about teaching and learning at each site. Parents will have access to student learning communities to keep abreast of their children’s progress and encouraging them to become integral members of the teaching and learning community.

By participating in Project ICT, students will acquire valuable knowledge in the use of digital technology, communication tools, and have access to an online network of learning experiences that will manage, integrate and evaluate information in ways that will improve their academic performance and prepare them for careers in an information- based, global society.

Project Contact:
Celine Azoulay
Borough Instructional Technology Director
Staten Island South Brooklyn
E-mail: cazoula@schools.nyc.gov
http://www.oit.nycenet.edu External Link

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NYC Districts 21 and 18

The Leadership 2.0 Project

Theme focus: Leadership and System Change Through Technology Innovation

The primary purpose of The Leadership 2.0 Project is to improve teaching and learning by building a critical mass of school leaders who understand the value and have the knowledge to develop current technologies as an instructional tool at each school site. The integration of these technologies will result in improved academic performance through the development of creative classroom instruction. The Leadership 2.0 Project is the result of collaboration between 13 public schools with 12,000 students and four non-public schools serving 1,060 students in the partnering NYC school districts.

During the two year course of the project, each participating school will engage and support a team of leaders focusing on administrators, students and instructional leaders. The project will provide a comprehensive program of workshops and hands-on institutes that will develop leadership skills and support leadership team members as they learn to articulate a vision for success through instructional technology and provide the resources to achieve it. The highlight of this project will be the development of an online Professional Learning Community (PLC) that will provide resources for the leadership team at each school site. The PLC will serve as a platform that allows participants to integrate current technologies into their professional lives; understand how these tools improve teaching and learning; and how to create a customized vision and plan to meet the needs of their individual schools. By including students in the leadership team, schools will have new perspective on how they can create a relevant and challenging academic program that leads to improved student achievement.

Additionally, ten students and 10 teachers will take the Apple Digital Media course together bringing students into a leadership role and serve as digital mentors, working side by side with educators. The attendees will be able to train and certify their peers and increase digital leaders at participating schools. The experience will also provide students with real world, job-embedded skills.

Project Contact:
Celine Azoulay
Borough Instructional Technology Director
Staten Island South Brooklyn
E-mail: cazoula@schools.nyc.gov
http://www.oit.nycenet.edu External Link

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NYC Districts 23 and 32

New York City Opportunities for Online Learning - NYCOOL

Theme focus: Technology Literacy and ICT Skills Development and Assessment

Theme Five of the New York EETT calls for proposals that utilize evidence-based online courses for students and teachers. This document proposes to create a comprehensive vision for online education called the New York City Opportunities for Online Learning (NYCOOL) project.

Students in the eleven high schools in New York City Districts 23 and 32 will be invited to participate in an online course entitled “ICT Skills for the 21st Century.” The content of this course will go beyond core ICT subject area knowledge and address the new skills that our digital world demands--creative, problem-solving, and communications/ collaborative abilities. Contemporary ICT literacy in a digital world goes far beyond the reading and writing of text, to include hypertext writing, visual thinking and information-based problem solving. The NYCOOL model will utilize the Four Directions for Lifelong Learning, a structured process to develop 21st century literacy skills, including in-depth work with online safety. Each lesson provides a range of guided practice options for applying what’s been learned to meaningful, real-life situations, including a culminating project.

Much has been learned regarding the effectiveness and efficiency of online learning. NYCOOL will utilize research-based best practices and employ some of the most notable K-12 online learning organizations and experts. Organizations include the Virtual High School and the North American Council for Online Learning. Online learning experts that will help develop and deliver the NYCOOL online course include Dr. Ferdi Serim, Dr. Dennis Harper, Dr. Gary Stager, Susan Patrick, Dr. Ed Gragert, and Elizabeth Pape.

The initial NYCOOL online course will be delivered by the Virtual High School so District 23 and 32 high school students with a keen interest in modern technology can do so even if for some reason are unable to take an in-house ICT course. Reasons include: (1) no such course available in their school, (2) schedule conflicts, (3) part-time students with jobs, (4) students wanting to earn college credit in high school, and (5) non-traditional students that learn better in online situations. A teacher from each participating school will act as the VHS coordinator and will receive advanced training from the Virtual High School staff. These VHS coordinators will ensure that students are making progress toward completion of the online class.

During each semester, 25 students in each of the 11 participating high schools will have the opportunity to take the initial NYCOOL course (total of 550 students). In addition, any teacher in any District 23 or 32 district school will be able to take an online course aimed at how 21st century skills and Web 2.0 applications are relevant to learning for today's students (up to 160 total teachers). These teachers will bring new technology skills and a revitalized enthusiasm for teaching back into their classrooms, thus passing the benefits of their experience on to countless additional NYC students and colleagues. NYCOOL students and teachers alike will become independent learners and capable technology users — skills that will help students succeed in college and future jobs, and help teachers succeed in the classroom.

Project Contact:
Feaster Barbara
E-mail: BFeaster@schools.nyc.gov
Phone: (718) 935-4275 / Fax: (718) 935-4456
Borough Instructional Technology

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NYC Districts 24 and 28

Transforming Teachers Through Technology (T4)

Theme focus: Technology Infusion into Instruction through Professional Development

Transforming Teachers Through Technology (T4) is an intensive professional development program focused on EETT Theme 2, “Technology Infusion into Instruction through Professional Development.” Its goal is to build sustained professional learning communities within schools and create pairings and near peer mentoring support that will sustain the program beyond the grant period and inspire the school culture to embed technology into instruction throughout the future to improve student achievement. Technology professional development will increase student achievement in the areas of English Language Arts (ELA).

NYCDOE Community School Districts 24 and 28 will partner in this proposal with 19 NYC public schools and 5 non-public schools in the Borough of Queens. District 24 public schools include: IS 5, PS 7, PS 14, PS 16, PS 19, PS 28, IS 61, IS 73, IS 77, PS 89, IS 93, PS 143, International High School at LaGuardia and the High School of the Arts and Business. District 28 public schools include: JHS 8, PS 40, JHS 72, PS 86, and JHS 217. Participating non-public schools include: Martin Luther High School, Redeemer Lutheran School, St. Nicholas of Tolentine School St. Teresa of Avila School and the Al-Iman School.

The T4 program will enhance teaching quality through professional development training using technology-embedded lessons specifically crafted for the literacy needs of all students with an emphasis on students with disabilities. The professional development model being implemented by T4 will organize adults into learning communities whose goals are aligned with those of the school and provide educators with the knowledge and skills to collaborate. Technology-infused teachers instruction will use a multi-sensory approach to bring materials to life and stimulate thinking.

Who: Teachers serving the general education and special education population will be paired in the SINI, SURR and Corrective Action Schools in Districts 24 and 28 to include our non-public school partners. All participating teachers will be involved in impacting their students’ achievement in English Language Arts . Participating teachers will be recommended by their principals and will be required to turn key information to build capacity within their school buildings. A factor used in the selection process will be the teacher's willingness to share with peers and mentor new participants within the school community. Teachers selected will have an opportunity to receive professional development credits toward their NYC requirements. Each cycle will yield 48 trained teachers. Ninety-six teachers will be trained per year with a total of 192 trained at the end of the two-year grant. The program is designed so that participating general ed and soecial ed teachers work collaboratively to build on their strengths and gain the knowledge and expertise from their peers. CTT teachers are preferred.

What: The teachers will receive high-quality, sustained training in the form of professional development workshops and push-in support to enable infusion of technology to improve student performance in literacy by focusing on students’ different learning modalities. Teachers will receive professional development on using the Internet as communication and collaboration tool by creating their own blogs, navigating the web portal, conducting research using the Internet, using online resources such as NYLearns and New York State Virtual Learning Systems for standards based aligned lessons. Teachers will receive professional development on using an interactive board for instruction, creating podcasts, creating digital documentaries and MS office. Teachers will be required to participate in a 30 hour P-Credit course in order to fully realize the professional development provided.

Project Contact:
Winnie Bracco
Borough Instructional Technology Director
E-mail: wbracco@schools.nyc.gov
Phone: (XXX) XXX-XXXX / Fax: (XXX) XXX -XXXX
Queens Office of Instructional Technology
82-01 Rockaway Boulevard
Ozone Park, NY 11416

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NYC Districts 27 and 25

Achievement Beyond Intensive Learning to Infuse Technology Including Every Student (ABILITIES)

Theme focus: Technology Infusion Into Instruction through Professional Development

Achievement Beyond Intensive Learning to Infuse Technology Including Every Student (ABILITIES) is an intensive professional development program focused on EETT Theme 2, Technology Infusion into Instruction through Professional Development. Its goal to build professional learning communities (PLC) within schools, providing teachers with high quality professional development through graduate courses provided by the New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) and the ABILITIES Institute in collaboration with New York After School Professional Development Program (NYASPD). The Abilities Institute will offer “P” credit courses which will empower teachers with knowledge and ability to extend the program beyond the scope of the grant.

ABILITIES will serve an estimated 100 teachers (80 public, 20 non-public) with an estimated impact on 8,400 public and non-public school students. Participating teachers in the NYIT and the ABILITIES Institute will form an ongoing professional learning community, creating intentional connections between public school teachers in the two Queens public school districts, between non-public and public school teachers and between general education teachers and teachers of students with disabilities. All participating teachers will communicate through distance learning as well as collaborative online tools such as Blackboard, NYLearns, and blogs.

WHO: A total of 100 teachers (50 each year) of students with disabilities and teachers of general education students in Schools in Need of Improvement in Districts 25 and 27 with our non-public school partners will be involved in impacting their students’ achievement in ELA (Goal 1). Participating teachers (from both public and non-public schools) will be recommended by their principal, complete an application and be selected by program coordinators. Each summer institute will include thirty teachers for the professional development credits coursework track who will be selected from among the teachers in these schools. Included in the factors that will be used in selecting teachers will be whether they have the background on which the professional development will be based, the resulting balance within the selected teachers, the possibility of expanding the impact through sharing of the knowledge and skills with peers, and their general willingness to explore the various themes within the project.

WHAT: The teachers will receive high-quality, sustained professional development in the form of an online graduate level course, professional development workshops and push-in support (Goal 5) to enable infusion of technology (Goal 2) to improve student performance in literacy by focusing on differentiating ELA instruction according to students’ needs (Goal 1) and having students use technology to meet their needs (Goal 4).

WHERE: Professional development will occur in-person and online. On-site professional development will occur within Queens or at NYIT. Online contact will occur through existing and collaborative technologies facilitated by NYIT. The infusion into the curriculum will occur in the classrooms of teachers in Districts 25 and 27.

HOW: Professional development will occur primarily through graduate courses or a summer institute with sustained after-school sessions. Staff developers will support teachers as they begin to infuse technology into instruction that targets student deficiencies in specific ELA performance indicators. Push-in support will ensure that students engage in project-based learning activities that will develop their literacy skills and help them improve their academic performance in ELA. Each course will be designed to team general education teachers with special education teachers to facilitate in person and online community building, strengthening collaboration between teachers in different subgroups.

Project Contact:
Winnie Bracco
Borough Instructional Technology Director
E-mail: wbracco@schools.nyc.gov
Phone: (XXX) XXX-XXXX / Fax: (XXX) XXX -XXXX
Queens Office of Instructional Technology
82-01 Rockaway Boulevard
Ozone Park, NY 11416

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NYC Districts 30 and 29

Technology Enhancing Literacy Learners (TELL)

Theme focus: Technology Literacy and ICT Skills Development and Assessment

Technology Enhancing Literacy Learners (TELL) is an intensive professional development program focused on EETT Theme 2, “Technology Infusion into Instruction through Professional Development”. Its goal is to build sustained professional learning communities within schools and create pairing and peer-to-peer mentoring support that will sustain the program beyond the grant period and inspire the school culture to embed technology into instruction in the future.

Districts 29 and 30 will partner in this proposal with 12 NYC public schools and 8 non-public schools in the borough of Queens. Technology professional development will increase student achievement in the area of English Language Arts. District 29 public schools include: IS 192 and IS 238. District 30 public schools include: PS 111, PS 151, IS 126, IS 141, IS 145, IS 204, IS 230, IS 235, Long Island City High School and the Newcomers High School. Participating non-public schools in District 29 include Holy Trinity Lutheran School, Incarnation School, Sts. Joachim & Anne School, St. Joseph’s Parish Day School, St. Catherine’s School and the Sacred Heart School. Participating non-public schools in District 30 include Our Lady of Fatima School and St. Francis of Assisi School.

The TELL program will enhance teaching quality through professional development training using technology-embedded lessons specifically crafted for the Literacy needs of all students, with an emphasis on Limited English Proficient/English Language Learners. Participating SINI, SURR and Corrective Action schools will select teachers to share expertise and to establish a peer-to-peer support system. Estimated populations to be served by this grant include: 152 public school teachers, 40 non-public school teachers, 16,440 public school students and 1200 non-public schools students. Non-public school teachers will participate in this program to enhance instruction through technology-embedded lessons. The overall goal of the program is to build professional learning communities of teachers within the schools that will sustain themselves beyond the grant period using the skills, knowledge and resources obtained by the grant and by sharing of best practices through the New York State Virtual Learning System.

The professional development model being implemented by TELL is in accordance with the standards of the National Staff Development Council. According to NSDC’s Standards for Staff Development (2001), staff development that improves the learning of all students: 1) Organizes adults into learning communities whose goals are aligned with those of the school; 2) Provides educators with the knowledge and skills to collaborate; 3) Provides them with research-based instructional strategies to assist students in meeting rigorous academic standards.

Technology-infused teacher instruction uses a multi-sensory approach to bring class materials to life in a way that stimulates young minds and facilitates learning. By incorporating pictures, sound and animation, multimedia instruction significantly enhances students’ ability to improve understanding of complex systems and stories. Technology embedded lessons using this multi-sensory approach engage and empower all students to achieve their potential. Studies have demonstrated that adding relevant graphical presentation to text description can lead to better learning than text alone. (Mayer 2001, Sweller 1999).

Project Contact:
Winnie Bracco
Borough Instructional Technology Director
E-mail: wbracco@schools.nyc.gov
Phone: (XXX) XXX-XXXX / Fax: (XXX) XXX -XXXX
Queens Office of Instructional Technology
82-01 Rockaway Boulevard
Ozone Park, NY 11416

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NYC Districts 31 and 22

The PEARLS Program: Partnership in Education And Redesign for Leadership in Schools

Theme focus: Leadership and System Change Through Technology Innovation

The primary focus of the PEARLS project is to improve teaching and learning by targeting school level administrators, teacher leaders and students in a collaborative team approach to professional development in order to create a comprehensive, systemic professional development community. The PEARLS Program will address the need to develop leadership skills and a strong knowledge base in instructional technology within the many different communities found in a school building. Instructional leaders, school administrators, teacher leaders, and students will establish a Professional Learning Community (PLC), in which all barriers are broken down and an exchange of knowledge can take place. The PEARLS Project is the result of collaboration between 15 public schools and 13 non-public schools serving an approximate total of 11,000 students in the two partnering NYC school districts.

The highlight of the PEARLS Project is team members of varying backgrounds and abilities, joining together to form a Professional Learning Community. The project will focus on how changing leadership roles through innovative technology applications will impact teaching and learning, leading to improved academic performance. The teams at each school site will address a new paradigm for leadership – leadership that can articulate a vision for success through instructional technology and provide the resources to achieve that vision. The project will deliver a program of professional development in leadership designed to result in systemic change by implementing a comprehensive professional development program, providing ongoing support to participants with the increased use of technology. The result will yield a strong core of school-based leaders at all levels of teaching and learning who can articulate and implement a shared vision for student success. They will be able to redefine leadership in two essential ways: by using technology to enhance leadership and by expanding the circle of leaders to include students and teachers. The project will prepare school leadership teams to understand how technology can enlighten them about ways students learn and how to adapt teaching to maximize those learning styles.

Project Contact:
Celine Azoulay
Borough Instructional Technology Director
Staten Island South Brooklyn
E-mail: cazoula@schools.nyc.gov
http://www.oit.nycenet.edu External Link

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Oswego BOCES

Reading and Technology Project

Theme focus: Data-driven Differentiated Instruction and Learning

Oswego County BOCES recently applied for and received funds from the Title IID - Enhancing Education Through Technology Program for the purpose of running a Reading and Technology Project. The project aims to provide data-driven differentiated instruction and learning, and has outlined the following goals:

  • Goal 1: All students in the target group will utilize technology resources to improve their reading skills through individualized activities.
  • Goal 2: All teachers in the target group will receive professional development to learn to use technology tools and datadriven differentiated instruction and learning supported by a coaching model.
  • Goal 3: All students and teachers will utilize technology to create opportunities for collaboration in students’ own progress monitoring.

Goals identifi ed provide teachers with strategies for differentiating instruction and support for implementing these strategies including the utilization of technology as a tool to enhance learning. Achievement of these goals will train teachers to better utilize data and increase analysis of data at the individual student level, and technical solutions for generating skill level reports for teacher use. Continually provide opportunities for teachers in different grade levels, and school districts to collaborate on aligning reading curriculum. Successful completion of the project will support literacy at all levels including better use of diagnostic information.

Project Contact:
Jane Suddaby
Assistant Superintendent for Instructional Support
E-mail: jsuddaby@oswegoboces.org
Tel: (315) 963-4248 / Fax (315) 963-3885
Oswego County BOCES
179 County Route 64
Mexico, NY 13114

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Rochester CSD

Tech Infusion for Teachers

Theme focus: Technology Infusion into Instruction through Professional Development

The project will advance technology integration skills of secondary and middle school teachers, focusing on teachers in grades 7 and 8 and teachers at SURR or SINI designated schools. The project will serve a total of 900 teachers and more than 15,000 students. More than 450 teachers will be trained at RCSD each year of the project, 53 teachers will trained as trainers serving as either school-based resource trainers, core content/instructional strategy trainers or instructional technology trainers. More than 15,396 RCSD secondary students, grades 7-12, will ultimately benefit each year from the newly trained teachers. Approximately 72 teachers will benefit at EISD. More than 795 East Irondequoit Middle School students will benefit each year from newly-trained teachers.

The Project has two primary sub-themes/components: embedded professional development on Technology Infusion and data-driven, customized professional development on Technology Infusion. Teacher’s current practice and skills as they relate to technology and core curriculum will be self-evaluated. Instructional Technology (IT) staff will analyze the surveys and develop detailed Individualized Learning Paths (ILP) for each teacher as they engage in peer-led trainings properly suited for their instructional level. The second component of the project provides enhanced classroom settings in middle and high schools that develop the learning environments and provide opportunities in Math, ELA, and Social Studies for teacher training in curricula integration with technology. These classrooms will be outfitted for new technology and form the framework for training. Building-based trainers will ensure onsite resources for technology and curriculum integration.

Project Contact:
Tim Cliby
Director of Instructional Technology
E-mail: tim.cliby@rcsdk12.org
(585) 262-8743
Rochester City School District
131 West Broad Street
Rochester, NY 14614

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Southern Westchester BOCES

Theme focus: Data-driven Differentiated Instruction and Learning

Southern Westchester BOCES (SWBOCES) together with the Lower Hudson Regional Information Center, on behalf of a consortium of 8 Public School Districts, 1 Special Act School District and 1 non-public school, including: eligible districts: Mount Vernon, Peekskill, New Rochelle, Port Chester, White Plains, and additional districts of Greenburgh 7, Nyack, Tarrytown, Hawthorne Cedar Knolls (Special Act District), and Sacred Heart (nonpublic school) in Mount Vernon, with its partner Pearson Digital Learning is applying for a Title IID EETT grant. With a focus on creating a culture of continuous improvement through inquiry based data teams that will plan for instructional improvement including data-driven customized instruction; adaptive assessment and learning; and performance-based and innovative learning, the grant in year one will support these districts in raising student achievement and eliminating achievement gaps among subgroups at the Middle School level. This project will provide a bridge across the ocean of students’ learning results and data available from State Assessments, local and classroom assessments. This project will focus on those areas of need identified through a study of current student achievement data and from surveys of district and school leaders.

Research used in this grant includes The Framework for Accountability developed by the Annenberg Institute for School Reform; the Instructional Improvement Through Inquiry and Collaboration Project of the Coalition of Essential Schools, which laid a foundation to help schools use data-based inquiry to address school challenges, and Data Analysis for School Improvement by the National Association of Elementary School Principals (2002-2003), which found that educators who have learned how to effectively use assessment data have achieved positive results at the district, school, classroom and student levels. This project uses the Nancy Love Model for Data-Driven Decision Making and Action and the process used by SWBOCES to work with Port Chester to develop a Content Adoption Plan.

The goals of this two-year project are to: 1) Ensure that school and district leaders work with classroom teachers to analyze and understand data based on state assessments, local assessments and classroom assessments; 2) Ensure that every teacher differentiates instruction to meet the individual learning needs of each student based on understanding data that results in data-driven customized instruction, adaptive assessment and learning, and innovative performance-based learning for all students; 3) Ensure that school and district leaders work with classroom teachers to identify and evaluate technology-based materials and exemplary instructional materials and practices to enable teachers to differentiate instruction for all students; 4) Ensure that school and district leaders work with classroom teachers to identify and evaluate technology-based materials and exemplary instructional materials and practices to enable teachers to differentiate instruction for Students with Disabilities and English Language Learners; and 5) Ensure that all students meet State standards in ELA and Math and that Students with Disabilities, English Language Learners and low income students meet state standards.

Project Contact:
Maureen McCarthy
Manager of Data Services
E-mail: mmccarthy@lhric.org
(914) 592-4203, x3337
Southern Westchester BOCES
17 Berkley Drive
Rye Brook, NY 10573

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St Lawrence BOCES

Success through Increased Learning Opportunities (StILO)

Theme focus: The Expanding Learning Opportunities through Online Teaching and Learning

The StILO consortium consists of 29 rural districts comprised of 66 public schools, 5 of which fall under SINI status, and 6 non-public schools, with a combined enrollment of 26,455 students from 6 counties including Fulton, Herkimer, Lewis, Montgomery, Otsego and St. Lawrence. The project has two main components: first, offering students an alternative means, through Accelerate U online courses, to obtain high school credit when they fall behind their cohort group and second, targeting at-risk students, prior to high school, with researched-based, effective instruction that has been shown to be a positive intervention strategy. The instructional strategies come primarily from the research of the National Dropout Prevention Center at Clemson University, the work of Robert Marzano (Classroom Instruction that Works) and Reading Next. At the end of the two year pilot each district will have established policies and procedures for:

  • identifying students who would most benefit from online courses
  • providing support to identified students
  • establishing logistical details such as where do students report to take a course
This pilot will also provide data about the success or failure of students enrolled in online courses to determine which students under what conditions will benefit from this alternative approach.

Similarly, the online professional development model will start small but will grow as the Instructional Technology Curriculum Coaches learn to create courses using effective instructional design principles. The summer camp will provide the initial, intense professional development that will be expanded through online opportunities during the year, when teachers and schools are most resistant to having teachers leave their classrooms.

Project Contact:
Jennifer French
Project Director, Supervisor of Instructional Technology
E-mail: jfrench@sllboces.org
Phone: (315) 386-2226 / Fax (315) 386-2828
St. Lawrence-Lewis BOCES
30 Court Street
Canton, NY 13648

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Syracuse City School District

Manhattan's Roadmap to Twenty-first Century Elementary Schools

Theme focus: Technology Infusion Into Instruction through Professional Development

The purpose of Syracuse’s EETT ePortfolio Project is to improve students’ academic performance in the core subject areas of ELA, mathematics, science as well as technology literacy through effective use of technology in the process of teaching and learning, with a focus on Technology Literacy and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Skills Development and Assessment. The abbreviated goals of the project are: (1) to improve student academic achievement in ELA, math and science through the use of technology; (2) to assist every student in becoming technologically literate; and (3) to encourage and ensure the effective integration of technology resources and systems with curriculum and professional development.

In the project’s first year, the Syracuse City School District will pilot the EETT ePortfolio Project targeting a specific Smaller Learning Community Academy in each of our five high schools. An interdisciplinary team of six (6) teachers from each Academy has been selected from a pool that applied. The teams consist minimally of a math, science and English teacher, as well as three teachers representing other areas (e.g., art, social studies, special education, English as a second language, career education or technology). Each teacher will receive a technology kit consisting of a laptop computer with a variety of software, a document camera, video camera, scanner, projector, headphones and a microphone. Each teacher has agreed to participate in at least 45 hours of intensive, ongoing staff development on the use of instructional technologies and applications and integrating these tools and applications into classroom practice.

Teacher teams will work collaboratively to establish and implement interdisciplinary lessons and instructional units using the new technologies and applications. These lessons will be peer-reviewed to ensure that they meet the highest standards for both rigor and relevance (i.e., ‘Quadrant D’ lessons) and will be disseminated via the Successful Practices Network and NYSED’s Virtual Learning System. In the second year, the EETT ePortfolio Project will be expanded to include interdisciplinary teacher teams and students from five of the feeder middle schools. At least 50 teachers and 2,250 students will participate directly in the ePortfolio Project during the course of the funding. This number will grow exponentially in subsequent years as the model is replicated and expanded throughout the District. All participating students will develop ePortfolios containing multiple artifacts documenting their attainment of ICT skills as well as academic growth in the areas of ELA, math and science. Furthermore, teachers will themselves develop electronic portfolios containing their new Quadrant D lesson plans, and documenting the work they engage in and perform as a function of their project participation.

The EETT ePortfolio Project’s activities are based on sound research and evidence-based practices, including work conducted by the Center for Applied Research in Educational Technology. CARET concludes that allocation of time for teachers to collaboratively learn and practice using technology can increase teacher confidence and interest, and that teachers are motivated and empowered to develop their own technology skills when professional development links technology applications to specific curriculum goals. Their findings also indicate that technology improves student performance when the application provides opportunities for students to design and implement projects that extend the curriculum content being assessed by a particular standardized test, and enables the development of critical thinking skills when they use technology presentation and communication skills to present, publish and share results of projects.

Project Contact:
Michael Puntschenko
Director of Special Programs
E-mail: TBader@schools.nyc.gov
Phone: (315) 435-5840 / Fax: (315) 435-4025
725 Harrison St. Syracuse, NY 13210

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Utica City School District

Theme focus: Leadership and System Change through Technology Innovation

The Utica City School District in collaboration with the Lansingburgh Central Schools and Middletown Schools through the Enhancing Education through Technology (EETT) is focused on improving student’s academic performance using the thematic category of “Leadership and System Change through Technology Innovation”. The Utica City School District will provide training and mentoring for building and central office administrators.

Professional development and mentoring are among our strategies to analyze and modify the District Technology Plan to meet the essential conditions necessary for the successful use of technology. Administrators in Middletown and Lansingburgh will follow the basic project model while managing their own professional development and purchases. Collaborative districts are included in the Roundtable discussions in Utica on the Future of Technology in Education and may decide to use the same courses from ASCD. The specific approaches we will use in the grant include:

  • Online courses from ASCD including What Works in Schools, and Technology in Schools;
  • What Works in Schools online survey from ASCD to assist building administrators with comprehensive school planning;
  • Mentoring space on district EChalk for new administrators with monthly topics identified in the administrator’s survey;
  • Roundtable discussions on the future of technology in education led by Teresa Bader (NYC Schools, directory of Technology-Manhattan) to be followed by development of action plans and updating the District Technology Plan by administrators; and
  • Collaborative effort by central office and building administrators along with technology support staff to update district websites to improve communication and information sharing for all members of the school community.

Other highlights specific to the Utica City School District include:

  • Update all district forms to Adobe 8 which will allow online completion and submission;
  • Middle School Technology teachers will revise and expand the 8th grade technology assessment to both middle schools; and
  • Elementary teachers will receive professional development on presentation systems.

Project Contact:
Jamie Hanretty
Administrator of Special Programs
Email: jahanretty@uticaschools.org
Office: (315) 368-6027 / Fax: (315) 792-2209

Carla Percia
Director of Special Programs
Email: cpercia@uticaschools.org
Office: (315) 792-2266 / Fax: (315)792-2209

Utica City School District
1115 Mohawk Street
Utica, NY 13501

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/technology/programs/EETT_competitive_grant.html#utica

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Last Updated: September 29, 2010